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    34 bills

    1. Adequate Deployed Defense Act

      Senator: Senator Shultz Law Change:

      SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

      This Act may be cited as the "Adequate Deployed Defense Act."

      SECTION 2. DEFINITION OF DEFENSIVE EQUIPMENT, DEPLOYED, AND ADEQUATELY.

      a) Defensive equipment shall be defined as non-lethal by nature.

                 1. This includes but is not limited to: kevlar body armor, armored vehicles, night vision goggles, chemical filtration devices, etc.

      b) Deployed shall be defined as any service member currently deployed or to be deployed within 48 hours to a combat theatre.

      c) Adequately shall be defined as the minimum amount of equipment required for a serviceman to survive 90 days without guaranteed resupply.

      SECTION 3. IMPLEMENTATION

      a) An operation having been planned, requisite equipment must be obtained and distributed no later than 48 hours prior to operation's commencement.

      b) If requisite equipment has not been obtained and distributed by that point, then the operation must either proceed with the maximum number of adequately equipped service members or the operation must be cancelled.

      SECTION 4. LAW CHANGE

      1. In 2005, some 50,000 service members started the Iraq War without body armor. It was eventually handled but it took 167 days to finalize.

       

      2. Despite this, deaths still happened largely due to a lack of standardization.


      SECTION 5. EFFECTIVE DATE

      The bill shall go into effect upon its constitutional passage.

      • 3 comments
      • 79 views
    2. Protect our Law Enforcement Act

      Senator: Senator Shultz RL Author: Rep. Buck (CO-4) Law Change:

      This bill may be cited as the Protect our Law Enforcement Act.
       

      Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
      United States of America in Congress assembled,
      
      SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.
      
          This Act may be cited as the ``Protect our Law Enforcement Act''.
      
      SEC. 2. HATE CRIME AGAINST POLICE OFFICERS.
      
          (a) In General.--Chapter 13 of title 18, United States Code, is 
      amended by adding at the end the following:
      ``Sec. 250. Hate crimes against police officers
          ``(a) In General.--Whoever, in any circumstance described in 
      section 249(a)(2)(B) of this title, knowingly causes bodily injury to 
      any person, or attempts to do so, because of the actual or perceived 
      status of the person as a police officer--
                  ``(1) shall be imprisoned not more than 10 years, fined in 
              accordance with this title, or both; and
                  ``(2) shall be imprisoned for any term of years or for 
              life, fined in accordance with this title, or both, if--
                          ``(A) death results from the offense; or
                          ``(B) the offense includes kidnapping or an attempt 
                      to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse or an attempt to 
                      commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill.
          ``(b) Certification Requirement.--
                  ``(1) In general.--No prosecution of any offense described 
              in this section may be undertaken by the United States, except 
              under the certification in writing of the Attorney General, or 
              a designee, that--
                          ``(A) the State does not have jurisdiction;
                          ``(B) the State has requested that the Federal 
                      Government assume jurisdiction;
                          ``(C) the verdict or sentence obtained pursuant to 
                      State charges left demonstratively unvindicated the 
                      Federal interest in eradicating bias-motivated 
                      violence; or
                          ``(D) a prosecution by the United States is in the 
                      public interest and necessary to secure substantial 
                      justice.
                  ``(2) Rule of construction.--Nothing in this subsection 
              shall be construed to limit the authority of Federal officers, 
              or a Federal grand jury, to investigate possible violations of 
              this section.
          ``(c) Guidelines.--All prosecutions conducted by the United States 
      under this section shall be undertaken pursuant to guidelines issued by 
      the Attorney General, or the designee of the Attorney General, to be 
      included in the United States Attorneys' Manual that shall establish 
      neutral and objective criteria for determining whether a crime was 
      committed because of the actual or perceived status of any person.
          ``(d) Statute of Limitations.--
                  ``(1) Offenses not resulting in death.--Except as provided 
              in paragraph (2), no person shall be prosecuted, tried, or 
              punished for any offense under this section unless the 
              indictment for such offense is found, or the information for 
              such offense is instituted, not later than 7 years after the 
              date on which the offense was committed.
                  ``(2) Offenses resulting in death.--An indictment or 
              information alleging that an offense under this section 
              resulted in death may be found or instituted at any time 
              without limitation.
          ``(e) Definitions.--In this section:
                  ``(1) Police officer.--The term `police officer' means any 
              officer or employee of the United States, any State, or any 
              political subdivision of a State, while engaged in the 
              enforcement or prosecution of any of the criminal laws of the 
              United States, a State, or any political subdivision of a 
              State.
                  ``(2) State.--The term `State' includes the District of 
              Columbia, Puerto Rico, and any other territory or possession of 
              the United States.''.
          (b) Clerical Amendment.--The table of sections at the beginning of 
      such chapter is amended by adding at the end the following new item:
      
      ``250. Hate crimes against police officers.''.
                                       <all>
      • 9 comments
      • 48 views
    3. Net Neutrality Protection Act

      Senator: Senator Shultz RL Author: Mr. Maloney Law Change:

      Section 1. SHORT TITLE.

      This Act may be cited as the "Net Neutrality Protection Act"

      Section 2. RULEMAKING IN RELIANCE ON INTERNET FREEDOM NPRM PROHIBITED.

      Beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act, the Federal Communications Commission may not rely on the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in the matter of restoring internet freedom that was adopted by the Commission on May 18, 2017 (FCC 17–60), to satisfy the requirements of section 553 of title 5, United States Code, for adopting, amending, revoking, or otherwise modifying any rule (as defined in section 551 of such title) of the Commission.

      • 4 comments
      • 108 views
    4. Re-NAFTA Bill

      Senator: Senator Shultz Law Change:

      Section 1: Short Title

      This bill may be cited as the Re-NAFTA Bill.

      Section 2: Findings

      1. According to the Economic Policy Institute, between 1994 and 2015, the US lost some 700,000 manufacturing jobs. 

      2. The US trade deficit with NAFTA countries now accounted for 26.8% of all US goods trade deficit in 2010. The total trade deficit accounted for $94.6 billion.

      3. According to the Sierra Club, NAFTA was responsible for the proliferation of pollutants including fossil fuels, pesticides, and GMO. Environmentally destructive mining practices in Mexico increased and Canada was unable to regulate its oil industry effectively. NAFTA also created a path for corporations to fight environmental regulations.


      Section 3: Law Change

      a. That the US Congress gives its consent and repeals the North American Free Trade Act.

       

      b. Congress may authorize the President to renegotiate NAFTA.


      Section 4: Effective Date

      The bill shall go into effect on the next New Years Day following its passage unless Congress authorizes the President to renegotiate the deal.

      • 3 comments
      • 59 views
    5. Rural Broadband Access Expansion Act

      Senator: Senator Shultz Law Change:

      Section 1: Terms & Definitions

      1. Rural will refer to areas with fewer than 5000 residents per square mile.

      2. Broadband will conform with FCC regulations, specifically 25 Mbps (Megabits per second) download speeds and 4 Mbps upload speeds.


      Section 2: Findings

       

      1. In 2015, 39% of rural residents lacked access broadband. This contrasted with less than 5% of urban residents lacking access to broadband.

       

      2. According to the Brookings Institute, with government records such as Social Security now transitioning to online access, rural residents are now finding it harder to access those same records.

      3. There has been great reluctance on part of ISPs to provide access in rural areas primarily due to low population density and cost of installation.


      Section 3: Law Change

       

      Increase funding for the FCC's Connect America Fund to provide greater incentives for ISPs to invest in rural areas.

      • 5 comments
      • 28 views
    6. Diversified Health Care Choices Act.

      Senator: Senator Shultz RL Author: Senator Bennet and Senator Kaine Law Change:

      Section 1: Law Change

      Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

       

      SECTION 1. Short Title.

       

      This Act may be cited as the “Diversified Health Care Choices Act.”

       

      SECTION 2. Establishment and Administration of a Plan

                 TITLE XXII—MEDICARE EXCHANGE HEALTH PLAN

          

      SEC. 2201. ESTABLISHMENT.

       

      (a) ESTABLISHMENT —

       

       (1) IN GENERAL — The Secretary shall establish a coordinated and low-cost health plan, to be known as the ‘Medicare Exchange health plan’ (referred to in this section as the ‘health plan’) to provide access to quality health care for enrollees.

      (2) TIMEFRAME —

      (A) INDIVIDUAL MARKET AVAILABILITY —

      (i) IN GENERAL—In accordance with clause (ii), the Secretary shall make the health plan available in the individual market, in certain rating areas, for plan year 2020 and each subsequent plan year, and increase the availability such that the plan is available in the individual market to all residents of all rating areas in the United States for plan year 2023 and each subsequent plan year.

      (ii) PRIORITY AREAS —In determining in which rating areas the Secretary initially will make the health plan available, the Secretary shall give priority to rating areas in which—

      (I) not more than 1 health insurance issuer offers plans on the applicable State or Federal American Health Benefit Exchange (referred to in this title as the ‘Exchange’); or

       (II) there is a shortage of health providers or lack of competition that results in a high cost of health care services, including health professional shortage areas and rural areas.

      (B) SMALL GROUP MARKET — The Secretary shall make the health plan available in the small group market in all rating areas for plan year 2024.

       

      (b) ESTABLISHMENT OF FUNDS —

       

      (1) PLAN RESERVE FUND —

       

      (A) IN   GENERAL — There is established in the Treasury of the United States a ‘Plan Reserve Fund’, to be administered by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, for purposes of establishing the Medicare Exchange health plan and administering such plan, consisting of amounts appropriated to such fund.

      (B) APPROPRIATION — There is appropriated $1,000,000,000, out of monies in the Treasury not otherwise obligated, to the Plan Reserve Fund for fiscal year 2018.

       

      (2) DATA   AND TECHNOLOGY FUND — There is established in the Treasury of the United States a ‘Data and Technology Fund’, to be administered by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, acting through the Chief Actuary of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, for purposes of updating technology and performing data collection under section 2205 in order to establish appropriate premiums for all geographic regions of the United States. There are authorized to be appropriated to the Data and Technology Fund such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2018.

       

      (c) RULEMAKING — The Secretary may promulgate such regulations as may be necessary to carry out this title.

       

      SEC. 2202. AVAILABILITY OF PLAN.

       

      (a) ELIGIBILITY.—An individual shall be eligible to enroll in the health plan if such individual, for the entire period for which enrollment is sought—

       

      (1)          is a qualified individual within the meaning of section 1312 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (42 U.S.C. 18032); and

      (2)          (2) is not eligible for benefits under the Medicare program under title XVIII.

       

       (b) EXCHANGES.—In accordance with the timeframe under section 2201(a)(2), the health plan shall be made available through the American Health Benefit Exchanges described in sections 1311 and 1321 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (42 U.S.C. 18031, 18041), including the Small Business Health Options Program Exchange.

       

      SEC. 2203. PLAN REQUIREMENTS.

       

      (a) GENERAL REQUIREMENTS.—The health plan

      shall comply with all requirements of subtitle D of title I of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (42 U.S.C. 18021 et seq.) and title XXVII of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 300gg et seq.) applicable to qualified health plans, and such health plan shall be a qualified health plan, including for purposes of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.

       

      (c)  LEVELS OF COVERAGE — The Secretary —

       

       (1) shall make available a silver level and gold level version of the plan, in accordance with section 1301(a)(1)(C)(ii); and

       

      (2) may make available no more than 2 versions of the plan for each of the 4 levels of coverage described in subparagraphs (A) through (D) of section 1302(d)(1) of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (42 U.S.C. 18022(d)(1)).

       

      SEC. 2204. ADMINISTRATIVE CONTRACTING.

       

      (a) IN GENERAL.—The Secretary may enter into contracts for the purpose of performing administrative functions (including functions described in subsection (a)(4) of section 1874A) with respect to the health plan in the same manner as the Secretary may enter into contracts under subsection (a)(1) of such section. The Secretary shall have the same authority with respect to the public health insurance option as the Secretary has under such subsection (a)(1) and subsection (b) of section 1874A with respect to title XVIII.

       

      (b) TRANSFER   OF INSURANCE   RISK.—Any contract under subsection (a) shall not involve the transfer of insurance risk from the Secretary to the entity entering into such contract with the Secretary, except in the case of an alternative payment model under section 2209(h).

       

      SEC. 2205. DATA COLLECTION.

       

      Subject to all applicable privacy requirements, including the requirements under the regulations promulgated pursuant to section 264(c) of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (42 U.S.C. 1320d–2 note), the Secretary may collect data from State insurance commissioners and other relevant entities to establish rates for premiums and for other purposes including to improve quality, and reduce racial, ethnic, and other disparities, with respect to the health plan.

       

      SEC. 2206. PREMIUMS; RISK POOLS; REINSURANCE.

       

      (a) PREMIUM AMOUNTS.—The Secretary shall establish premiums for the health plan that cover the full actuarial cost of offering such plan, including the administrative costs of offering such plan. Such premiums shall vary geographically and between the small group market and the individual market in accordance with differences in the cost of providing such coverage. If, for any plan year, the amount collected in premiums exceeds the amount required for health care benefits and administrative costs in that plan year, such excess amounts shall remain available to the Secretary to administer the health plan and finance beneficiary costs in subsequent years.

       

      (b) RISK POOL — All enrollees in the health plan within a State shall be members of a single risk pool, except that the Secretary may establish separate risk pools for the individual market and small group market if the State has not exercised its authority under section 1312(c)(3) of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (42 U.S.C. 18032(c)(3)).

       

      (c) REINSURANCE — Notwithstanding subsection (b), the Secretary may establish a mechanism to pool the costs of the highest-cost patients on a nationwide basis to the extent such costs are not already pooled pursuant to section 1343 of the Patient Protection and Affordable 8 Care Act (42 U.S.C. 18063).

       

      SEC. 2207. REIMBURSEMENT RATES.

       

      (a) MEDICARE RATES —

       

      (1) IN   GENERA — Except   as provided in paragraph (2) and subsections (b) and (c) and subject to subsection (d), the Secretary shall reimburse health care providers furnishing items and services under the health plan at rates determined for equivalent items and services under the original Medicare fee-for-service program under parts A and B of title XVIII.

       

      (2) AUTHORITY TO INCREASE PAYMENT RATES IN RURAL AREAS.—If           the Secretary determines appropriate, the Secretary may increase the reimbursements rates described in paragraph (1) by up to 25 percent for items and services furnished in rural areas (as defined in section 1886(d)(2)(D)).

       

      (b) PRESCRIPTION DRUGS — Subject to subsection (d), payment rates for prescription drug shall be at a rate negotiated by the Secretary. Such negotiations may be in conjunction with negotiations for covered part D drugs under part D of title XVIII.

       

      (c) ADDITIONAL ITEMS   AND   SERVICES — Subject to subsection (d), the Secretary shall establish reimbursement rates for any items and services provided under the health plan that are not items and services provided under the original Medicare fee-for-service program under parts A and B of title XVIII.

       

      (d) INNOVATIVE PAYMENT METHODS — The Secretary may utilize innovative payment methods, including value-based payment arrangements, in making payments for items and services (including prescription drugs) furnished under the health plan.

       

      SEC. 2208. PARTICIPATING PROVIDERS.

       

      (a) IN GENERAL — A health care provider that is enrolled under the Medicare program under section 1866(j) or is a participating provider under a State Medicaid plan under title XIX on the date of enactment of this Act shall be a participating provider under the health plan.

       

      (b) ADDITIONAL PROVIDERS — The Secretary shall establish a process to allow health care providers not described in subsection (a) to become a participating provider under the health plan.

       

      (c) OPT-OUT — The Secretary shall establish a process by which a health care provider that is a participating provider under the health plan pursuant to subsection (a) or (b) may opt out of being such a participating provider.

       

      (d) REQUIREMENT   TO   PARTICIPATE   IN   ORDER   TO BE ENROLLED UNDER MEDICARE — Beginning January 1, 2019, a health care provider may not be enrolled under the Medicare program under section 1866(j) unless the provider is also a participating provider under the health plan.

       

      SEC. 2209. DELIVERY SYSTEM REFORM FOR AN ENHANCED HEALTH PLAN.

       

      (a) IN GENERA — For plan years beginning with plan year 2020, the Secretary may utilize innovative payment mechanisms and policies to determine payments for items and services under the health plan. The payment mechanisms and policies under this section may include patient-centered medical home and other care management payments, accountable care organizations, value-based purchasing, bundling of services, differential payment rates, performance or utilization based payments, telehealth, remote patient monitoring, partial capitation, and direct contracting with providers.

       

      (b) REQUIREMENTS FOR INNOVATIVE PAYMENTS.—The Secretary shall design and implement the payment mechanisms and policies under this section in a manner that—

       

      (1) seeks to—

       (A) improve health outcomes;

      (B) reduce health disparities (including racial, ethnic, and other disparities);

      (C) provide efficient and affordable care;

      (D) address geographic variation in the provision of health services; or

      (E) prevent or manage chronic illness;

       

      and

       

      (2) promotes care that is integrated, patient-centered, quality, and efficient.

       

      (c) ENCOURAGING THE USE OF HIGH VALUE SERVICES — To the extent allowed by the benefit standards applied to all health benefits plans participating in the Exchanges (as described in section 2202(b)), the health plan may modify cost-sharing and payment rates to encourage the use of services that promote health and value.

       

      (d) PROMOTION    OF   DELIVERY SYSTEM REFORM — The Secretary shall monitor and evaluate the progress of payment and delivery system reforms under this section and shall seek to implement such reforms subject to the following:

       

      (1) To the extent that the Secretary finds a payment and delivery system reform successful in improving quality and reducing costs, the Secretary shall implement such reform on as large a geographic scale as practical and economical.

       

      (2) The Secretary may delay the implementation of such a reform in geographic areas in which such implementation would place the public health insurance option at a competitive disadvantage.

       

      (3) The Secretary may prioritize implementation of such a reform in high cost geographic areas or otherwise in order to reduce total program costs or to promote high value care.

       

      (e) NON-UNIFORMITY PERMITTED — Nothing in this section shall prevent the Secretary from varying payments based on different payment structure models (such as accountable care organizations and medical homes) under the health plan for different geographic areas.

       

      (f) INTEGRATION WITH SOCIAL SERVICES — The Secretary shall establish processes and, when appropriate, collaborate with other agencies to integrate medical care under the health plan with food, housing, transportation, and income assistance if the Secretary determines that such integration is expected to

       

      (1) reduce spending without reducing the quality of patient care; or

       

      (2) improve the quality of patient care without increasing spending.

       

      (g) TELEHEALTH — The Secretary shall ensure the integration of telehealth tools that increase patient access to medical care, particularly in remote or underserved areas, if the Secretary determines that such integration is expected to —

       

      (1) reduce spending without reducing the quality of patient care;

       

      or

       

      (2) improve the quality of patient care without increasing spending.

       

      (h) ALTERNATIVE PAYMENT MODEL —

       

      (1) IN   GENERAL.—The Secretary shall evaluate the possibility of providing incentives, and, if appropriate, apply incentives, for enrollees in the health plan who receive services from providers who are participating in an alternative payment model (as defined in section 1833(z)(3)(C)).

       

      (2) AUTHORITY TO USE APMS IN USE UNDER

       

      TRADITIONAL MEDICARE — Nothing in this section shall preclude the Secretary from using alternative payment models (as so defined) under this title that are in use under title XVIII.

       

      SEC. 2210. NO EFFECT ON MEDICARE BENEFITS OR MEDICARE TRUST FUNDS.

       

      Nothing in this title shall —

       

      (1) affect the benefits available under title XVIII; or

      (2) impact the Federal Hospital Insurance Trust Fund under section 1817 or the Federal Supplementary Medical Insurance Trust Fund under section 1841 (including the Medicare Prescription Drug Account within such Trust Fund).’’.

      SEC. 3. AUTHORITY TO NEGOTIATE FAIR PRICES FOR MEDICARE PRESCRIPTION DRUGS.

       (a) IN GENERAL.—Section 1860D–11 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1395w–111) is amended by striking subsection (i).

       (b) EFFECTIVE DATE.—The amendment made by this section shall take effect on the date of the enactment of this Act.

      • 1 comment
      • 52 views
    7. The Secure Border Infrastructure Act

      Senator: Senator Shultz RL Author: Mr. McCaul Law Change:
      SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.
          (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this Act is as 
      follows:
      
      Sec. 1. Short title.
                              TITLE I--BORDER SECURITY
      
      Sec. 101. Definitions.
                      Subtitle A--Infrastructure and Equipment
      
      Sec. 102. Strengthening the requirements for barriers along the 
                                  southern border.
      Sec. 103. Air and Marine Operations flight hours.
      Sec. 104. Capability deployment to specific sectors and regions.
      Sec. 105. U.S. Border Patrol physical infrastructure improvements.
      Sec. 106. U.S. Border Patrol activities.
      Sec. 107. U.S. Border Patrol forward operating bases.
      Sec. 108. Border security technology program management.
      Sec. 109. National Guard support to secure the southern border and 
                                  reimbursement of States for deployment of 
                                  the National Guard at the southern border.
      Sec. 110. Operation Phalanx.
      Sec. 111. Merida Initiative.
      Sec. 112. Prohibitions on actions that impede border security on 
                                  certain Federal land.
      Sec. 113. Landowner and rancher security enhancement.
      Sec. 114. Eradication of carrizo cane and salt cedar.
      Sec. 115. Southern border threat analysis.
                               Subtitle B--Personnel
      
      Sec. 131. Additional U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents and 
                                  officers.
      Sec. 132. U.S. Customs and Border Protection retention incentives.
      Sec. 133. Anti-Border Corruption Reauthorization Act.
                                 Subtitle C--Grants
      
      Sec. 141. Operation Stonegarden.
                    Subtitle D--Authorization of Appropriations
      
      Sec. 151. Authorization of appropriations.
       TITLE II--EMERGENCY PORT OF ENTRY PERSONNEL AND INFRASTRUCTURE FUNDING
      
      Sec. 201. Ports of entry infrastructure.
      Sec. 202. Secure communications.
      Sec. 203. Border security deployment program.
      Sec. 204. Pilot and upgrade of license plate readers at ports of entry.
      Sec. 205. Biometric exit data system.
      Sec. 206. Sense of Congress on cooperation between agencies.
      Sec. 207. Authorization of appropriations.
      
                              TITLE I--BORDER SECURITY
      
      SEC. 101. DEFINITIONS.
      
          In this title:
                  (1) Appropriate congressional committee.--The term 
              ``appropriate congressional committee'' has the meaning given 
              the term in section 2(2) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
              (6 U.S.C. 101(2)).
                  (2) Commissioner.--The term ``Commissioner'' means the 
              Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
                  (3) High traffic areas.--The term ``high traffic areas'' 
              has the meaning given the term in section 102(e)(1) of the 
              Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 
              1996, as amended by section 102 of this Act.
                  (4) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary 
              of Homeland Security.
                  (5) Situational awareness.--The term ``situational 
              awareness'' has the meaning given the term in section 
              1092(a)(7) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
              Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328; 6 U.S.C. 223(a)(7)).
      
                      Subtitle A--Infrastructure and Equipment
      
      SEC. 102. STRENGTHENING THE REQUIREMENTS FOR BARRIERS ALONG THE 
                    SOUTHERN BORDER.
      
          Section 102 of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant 
      Responsibility Act of 1996 (Division C of Public Law 104-208; 8 U.S.C. 
      1103 note) is amended--
                  (1) by amending subsection (a) to read as follows:
          ``(a) In General.--The Secretary of Homeland Security shall take 
      such actions as may be necessary (including the removal of obstacles to 
      detection of illegal entrants) to construct, install, deploy, operate, 
      and maintain tactical infrastructure and technology in the vicinity of 
      the United States border to deter, impede, and detect illegal activity 
      in high traffic areas.'';
                  (2) in subsection (b)--
                          (A) in the subsection heading, by striking 
                      ``Fencing'' and inserting ``Physical Barriers'';
                          (B) in paragraph (1)--
                                  (i) in subparagraph (A), by inserting 
                              ``situational awareness and'' before 
                              ``operational control'';
                                  (ii) by amending subparagraph (B) to read 
                              as follows:
                          ``(B) Tactical infrastructure.--
                                  ``(i) In general.--Not later than January 
                              20, 2021, the Secretary of Homeland Security, 
                              in carrying out subsection (a), shall deploy 
                              the most practical and effective tactical 
                              infrastructure available along the United 
                              States border for achieving situational 
                              awareness and operational control of the 
                              border.
                                  ``(ii) Tactical infrastructure defined.--In 
                              this subparagraph, the term `tactical 
                              infrastructure' includes--
                                          ``(I) boat ramps, access gates, 
                                      forward operating bases, checkpoints, 
                                      lighting, and roads; and
                                          ``(II) physical barriers (including 
                                      fencing, border wall system, and levee 
                                      walls).''; and
                                  (iii) in subparagraph (C)(i), by striking 
                              ``fencing is'' and inserting ``physical 
                              barriers are'';
                          (C) in paragraph (2)--
                                  (i) by striking ``Attorney General'' and 
                              inserting ``Secretary of Homeland Security''; 
                              and
                                  (ii) by striking ``construction of fences'' 
                              and inserting ``the construction of physical 
                              barriers''; and
                          (D) by amending paragraph (3) to read as follows:
                  ``(3) Agent safety.--In carrying out this section, the 
              Secretary of Homeland Security may not construct reinforced 
              fencing or tactical infrastructure, as the case may be, that 
              would, in any manner, impede or negatively affect the safety of 
              any officer or agent of the Department of Homeland Security or 
              of any other Federal agency.'';
                  (3) in subsection (c), by amending paragraph (1) to read as 
              follows:
                  ``(1) In general.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
              law, the Secretary of Homeland Security is authorized to waive 
              all legal requirements the Secretary, in the Secretary's sole 
              discretion, determines necessary to ensure the expeditious 
              construction, installation, operation, and maintenance of the 
              tactical infrastructure and technology under this section. Any 
              such decision by the Secretary shall be effective upon 
              publication in the Federal Register.''; and
                  (4) by adding after subsection (c) the following new 
              subsections:
          ``(d) Construction, Installation, and Maintenance of Technology.--
                  ``(1) In general.--Not later than January 20, 2021, the 
              Secretary of Homeland Security, in carrying out subsection (a), 
              shall deploy the most practical and effective technology 
              available along the United States border for achieving 
              situational awareness and operational control of the border.
                  ``(2) Technology defined.--In this subsection, the term 
              `technology' includes border surveillance and detection 
              technology, including--
                          ``(A) radar surveillance systems;
                          ``(B) Vehicle and Dismount Exploitation Radars 
                      (VADER);
                          ``(C) 3-dimensional, seismic acoustic detection and 
                      ranging border tunneling detection technology;
                          ``(D) sensors;
                          ``(E) unmanned cameras; and
                          ``(F) man-portable and mobile vehicle-mounted 
                      unmanned aerial vehicles.
          ``(e) Definitions.--In this section:
                  ``(1) High traffic areas.--The term `high traffic areas' 
              means sectors along the northern, southern, or coastal border 
              that--
                          ``(A) are within the responsibility of U.S. Customs 
                      and Border Protection; and
                          ``(B) have significant unlawful cross-border 
                      activity.
                  ``(2) Situational awareness defined.--The term `situational 
              awareness' has the meaning given the term in section 1092(a)(7) 
              of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
              (Public Law 114-328).''.
      
      SEC. 103. AIR AND MARINE OPERATIONS FLIGHT HOURS.
      
          (a) Increased Flight Hours.--The Secretary shall ensure that not 
      fewer than 95,000 annual flight hours are carried out by Air and Marine 
      Operations of U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
          (b) Unmanned Aerial System.--The Secretary shall ensure that Air 
      and Marine Operations operate unmanned aerial systems for not less than 
      24 hours per day for five days per week.
          (c) Contract Air Support Authorization.--The Commissioner shall 
      contract for the unfulfilled identified air support mission critical 
      hours, as identified by the Chief of the U.S. Border Patrol.
          (d) Primary Mission.--The Commissioner shall ensure that--
                  (1) the primary mission for Air and Marine Operations is to 
              directly support U.S. Border Patrol activities along the 
              southern border of the United States; and
                  (2) the Executive Associate Commissioner of Air and Marine 
              Operations assigns the greatest priority to support missions 
              established by the Commissioner to carry out the requirements 
              under this Act.
          (e) High-Demand Flight Hour Requirements.--In accordance with 
      subsection (c), the Commissioner shall ensure that U.S. Border Patrol 
      Sector Chiefs--
                  (1) identify critical flight hour requirements; and
                  (2) direct Air and Marine Operations to support requests 
              from Sector Chiefs as their primary mission.
          (f) Study and Report.--
                  (1) Study.--Not later than 60 days after the date of the 
              enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall commence a 
              comprehensive study on the realignment of the Air and Marine 
              Office as a directorate of U.S. Border Patrol.
                  (2) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
              enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the 
              Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives 
              and the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs 
              of the Senate a report containing the results of the study 
              under paragraph (1), including recommendations and timeframes 
              for implementing the realignment described in such paragraph.
      
      SEC. 104. CAPABILITY DEPLOYMENT TO SPECIFIC SECTORS AND REGIONS.
      
          (a) In General.--Not later than January 20, 2021, the Secretary, in 
      implementing section 102 of the Illegal Immigration Reform and 
      Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 (as amended by section 102 of this 
      Act), and acting through the appropriate component of the Department of 
      Homeland Security, shall deploy to each sector or region of the 
      southern border and the northern border, in a prioritized manner to 
      achieve situational awareness and operational control of such borders, 
      the following additional capabilities:
                  (1) San diego sector.--For the San Diego sector, the 
              following:
                          (A) Subterranean surveillance and detection 
                      technologies.
                          (B) To increase coastal maritime domain awareness, 
                      the following:
                                  (i) Deployable, lighter-than-air surface 
                              surveillance equipment.
                                  (ii) Unmanned aerial vehicles with maritime 
                              surveillance capability.
                                  (iii) Maritime patrol aircraft.
                                  (iv) Coastal radar surveillance systems.
                                  (v) Maritime signals intelligence 
                              capabilities.
                          (C) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (D) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (E) A rapid reaction capability supported by 
                      aviation assets.
                          (F) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                  (2) El centro sector.--For the El Centro sector, the 
              following:
                          (A) Tower-based surveillance technology.
                          (B) Deployable, lighter-than-air ground 
                      surveillance equipment.
                          (C) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (D) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (E) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (F) A rapid reaction capability supported by 
                      aviation assets.
                  (3) Yuma sector.--For the Yuma sector, the following:
                          (A) Tower-based surveillance technology.
                          (B) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance systems.
                          (C) Deployable, lighter-than-air ground 
                      surveillance equipment.
                          (D) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (E) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (F) A rapid reaction capability supported by 
                      aviation assets.
                          (G) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (H) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                  (4) Tucson sector.--For the Tucson sector, the following:
                          (A) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (B) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (C) Tower-based surveillance technology.
                          (D) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (E) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (F) Deployable, lighter-than-air ground 
                      surveillance equipment.
                          (G) A rapid reaction capability supported by 
                      aviation assets.
                  (5) El paso sector.--For the El Paso sector, the following:
                          (A) Tower-based surveillance technology.
                          (B) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (C) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (D) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance systems.
                          (E) Deployable, lighter-than-air ground 
                      surveillance equipment.
                          (F) A rapid reaction capability supported by 
                      aviation assets.
                          (G) Man-portable surveillance capabilities.
                  (6) Big bend sector.--For the Big Bend sector, the 
              following:
                          (A) Tower-based surveillance technology.
                          (B) Deployable, lighter-than-air ground 
                      surveillance equipment.
                          (C) Improved agent communications capabilities.
                          (D) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (E) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (F) A rapid reaction capability supported by 
                      aviation assets.
                          (G) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (H) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                  (7) Del rio sector.--For the Del Rio sector, the following:
                          (A) Increased monitoring for cross-river dams, 
                      culverts, and footpaths.
                          (B) Improved agent communications capabilities.
                          (C) Improved maritime capabilities in the Amistad 
                      National Recreation Area.
                          (D) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (E) A rapid reaction capability supported by 
                      aviation assets.
                          (F) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (G) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                  (8) Laredo sector.--For the Laredo sector, the following:
                          (A) Maritime detection resources for the Falcon 
                      Lake region.
                          (B) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (C) Increased monitoring for cross-river dams, 
                      culverts, and footpaths.
                          (D) Ultralight aircraft detection capability.
                          (E) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (F) A rapid reaction capability supported by 
                      aviation assets.
                          (G) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                  (9) Rio grande valley sector.--For the Rio Grande Valley 
              sector, the following:
                          (A) Deployable, lighter-than-air ground 
                      surveillance equipment.
                          (B) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (C) Ultralight aircraft detection capability.
                          (D) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (E) Increased monitoring for cross-river dams, 
                      culverts, footpaths.
                          (F) A rapid reaction capability supported by 
                      aviation assets.
                          (G) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (H) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                  (10) Eastern pacific maritime region.--For the Eastern 
              Pacific Maritime region, the following:
                          (A) Not later than two years after the date of the 
                      enactment of this Act, an increase of not less than ten 
                      percent in the number of overall cutter, boat, and 
                      aircraft hours spent conducting interdiction operations 
                      over the average number of such hours during the 
                      preceding three fiscal years.
                          (B) Increased maritime signals intelligence 
                      capabilities.
                          (C) To increase maritime domain awareness, the 
                      following:
                                  (i) Unmanned aerial vehicles with maritime 
                              surveillance capability.
                                  (ii) Increased maritime aviation patrol 
                              hours.
                          (D) Increased operational hours for maritime 
                      security components dedicated to joint counter-
                      smuggling and interdiction efforts with other Federal 
                      agencies, including the Deployable Specialized Forces 
                      of the Coast Guard.
                  (11) Caribbean and gulf maritime region.--For the Caribbean 
              and Gulf Maritime region, the following:
                          (A) Not later than two years after the date of the 
                      enactment of this Act, an increase of not less than ten 
                      percent in the number of overall cutter, boat, and 
                      aircraft hours spent conducting interdiction operations 
                      over the average number of such hours during the 
                      preceding three fiscal years.
                          (B) Increased maritime signals intelligence 
                      capabilities.
                          (C) Increased maritime domain awareness and 
                      surveillance capabilities, including the following:
                                  (i) Unmanned aerial vehicles with maritime 
                              surveillance capability.
                                  (ii) Increased maritime aviation patrol 
                              hours.
                                  (iii) Coastal radar surveillance systems 
                              with long range day and night cameras capable 
                              of providing 100 percent maritime domain 
                              awareness of the United States territorial 
                              waters surrounding Puerto Rico, Mona Island, 
                              Desecheo Island, Vieques Island, Culebra 
                              Island, Saint Thomas, Saint John, and Saint 
                              Croix.
                          (D) Increased operational hours for maritime 
                      security components dedicated to joint counter-
                      smuggling and interdiction efforts with other Federal 
                      agencies, including the Deployable Specialized Forces 
                      of the Coast Guard.
                  (12) Blaine sector.--For the Blaine sector, the following:
                          (A) Coastal radar surveillance systems.
                          (B) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (C) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (D) Improved agent communications systems.
                          (E) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (F) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (G) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (H) Modernized port of entry surveillance 
                      capabilities.
                          (I) Increased maritime interdiction capabilities.
                  (13) Spokane sector.--For the Spokane sector, the 
              following:
                          (A) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (B) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (C) Improved agent communications systems.
                          (D) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (E) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (F) Completion of six miles of the Bog Creek road.
                          (G) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (H) Modernized port of entry surveillance 
                      capabilities.
                          (I) Increased maritime interdiction capabilities.
                  (14) Havre sector.--For the Havre sector, the following:
                          (A) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (B) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (C) Improved agent communications systems.
                          (D) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (E) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (F) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (G) Modernized port of entry surveillance 
                      capabilities.
                  (15) Grand forks sector.--For the Grand Forks sector, the 
              following:
                          (A) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (B) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (C) Improved agent communications systems.
                          (D) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (E) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (F) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (G) Modernized port of entry surveillance 
                      capabilities.
                  (16) Detroit sector.--For the Detroit sector, the 
              following:
                          (A) Coastal radar surveillance systems.
                          (B) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (C) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (D) Improved agent communications systems.
                          (E) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (F) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (G) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (H) Modernized port of entry surveillance 
                      capabilities.
                          (I) Increased maritime interdiction capabilities.
                  (17) Buffalo sector.--For the Buffalo sector, the 
              following:
                          (A) Coastal radar surveillance systems.
                          (B) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (C) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (D) Improved agent communications systems.
                          (E) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (F) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (G) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (H) Modernized port of entry surveillance 
                      capabilities.
                          (I) Increased maritime interdiction capabilities.
                  (18) Swanton sector.--For the Swanton sector, the 
              following:
                          (A) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (B) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (C) Improved agent communications systems.
                          (D) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (E) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (F) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (G) Modernized port of entry surveillance 
                      capabilities.
                  (19) Houlton sector.--For the Houlton sector, the 
              following:
                          (A) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (B) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (C) Improved agent communications systems.
                          (D) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (E) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (F) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (G) Modernized port of entry surveillance 
                      capabilities.
          (b) Tactical Flexibility.--
                  (1) Southern and northern land borders.--The Secretary may 
              alter the capability deployment referred to in this section if 
              the Secretary determines, after notifying the Committee on 
              Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of the Senate and 
              the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of 
              Representatives, that such alteration is required to enhance 
              situational awareness or operational control.
                  (2) Maritime border.--
                          (A) Notification.--The Commandant of the Coast 
                      Guard shall notify the Committee on Homeland Security 
                      and Governmental Affairs of the Senate, the Committee 
                      on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate, 
                      the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of 
                      Representatives, and the Committee on Transportation 
                      and Infrastructure of the House of Representatives 
                      regarding the capability deployments referred to in 
                      this section, including information relating to--
                                  (i) the number and types of assets and 
                              personnel deployed; and
                                  (ii) the impact such deployments have on 
                              the capability of the Coast Guard to conduct 
                              its mission in each of the sectors referred to 
                              in paragraphs (10) and (11) of subsection (a).
                          (B) Alteration.--The Commandant of the Coast Guard 
                      may alter the capability deployments referred to in 
                      this section if the Commandant--
                                  (i) determines, after consultation with the 
                              committees referred to in subparagraph (A), 
                              that such alteration is necessary; and
                                  (ii) not later than 30 days after making a 
                              determination under clause (i), notifies the 
                              committees referred to in such subparagraph 
                              regarding such alteration, including 
                              information relating to--
                                          (I) the number and types of assets 
                                      and personnel deployed pursuant to such 
                                      alteration; and
                                          (II) the impact such alteration has 
                                      on the capability of the Coast Guard to 
                                      conduct its mission in each of the 
                                      sectors referred to in subsection (a).
      
      SEC. 105. U.S. BORDER PATROL PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENTS.
      
          The Secretary shall upgrade existing physical infrastructure of the 
      Department of Homeland Security, and construct and acquire additional 
      physical infrastructure, including--
                  (1) U.S. Border Patrol stations;
                  (2) U.S. Border Patrol checkpoints;
                  (3) mobile command centers; and
                  (4) other necessary facilities, structures, and properties.
      
      SEC. 106. U.S. BORDER PATROL ACTIVITIES.
      
          The Chief of the U.S. Border Patrol shall direct agents of the U.S. 
      Border Patrol to patrol as close to the physical land border as 
      possible, consistent with the accessibility to such areas.
      
      SEC. 107. U.S. BORDER PATROL FORWARD OPERATING BASES.
      
          (a) Upgrades and Maintenance for Forward Operating Bases.--Not 
      later than January 20, 2021, the Secretary shall upgrade existing 
      forward operating bases of U.S. Border Patrol on or near the southern 
      border to ensure that such bases meet the minimum requirements set 
      forth in subsection (b).
          (b) Minimum Requirements.--Each forward operating base operated by 
      U.S. Customs and Border Protection shall be equipped with--
                  (1) perimeter security;
                  (2) short-term detention space (separate from existing 
              housing facilities);
                  (3) portable generators or shore power sufficient to meet 
              the power requirements for the base;
                  (4) interview rooms;
                  (5) adequate communications, including wide area network 
              connectivity;
                  (6) cellular service;
                  (7) potable water; and
                  (8) a helicopter landing zone.
      
      SEC. 108. BORDER SECURITY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM MANAGEMENT.
      
          (a) In General.--Subtitle C of title IV of the Homeland Security 
      Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 231 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the 
      following new section:
      
      ``SEC. 434. BORDER SECURITY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM MANAGEMENT.
      
          ``(a) Major Acquisition Program Defined.--In this section, the term 
      `major acquisition program' means an acquisition program of the 
      Department that is estimated by the Secretary to require an eventual 
      total expenditure of at least $300,000,000 (based on fiscal year 2017 
      constant dollars) over its life cycle cost.
          ``(b) Planning Documentation.--For each border security technology 
      acquisition program of the Department that is determined to be a major 
      acquisition program, the Secretary shall--
                  ``(1) ensure that each such program has a written 
              acquisition program baseline approved by the relevant 
              acquisition decision authority;
                  ``(2) document that each such program is meeting cost, 
              schedule, and performance thresholds as specified in such 
              baseline, in compliance with relevant departmental acquisition 
              policies and the Federal Acquisition Regulation; and
                  ``(3) have a plan for meeting program implementation 
              objectives by managing contractor performance.
          ``(c) Adherence to Standards.--The Secretary, acting through the 
      Under Secretary for Management and the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and 
      Border Protection, shall ensure border security technology acquisition 
      program managers who are responsible for carrying out this section 
      adhere to relevant internal control standards identified by the 
      Comptroller General of the United States. The Commissioner shall 
      provide information, as needed, to assist the Under Secretary in 
      monitoring management of border security technology acquisition 
      programs under this section.
          ``(d) Plan.--The Secretary, acting through the Under Secretary for 
      Management, in coordination with the Under Secretary for Science and 
      Technology and the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 
      shall submit a plan to the appropriate congressional committees for 
      testing, evaluating, and using independent verification and validation 
      resources for border security technology. Under the plan, new border 
      security technologies shall be evaluated through a series of 
      assessments, processes, and audits to ensure--
                  ``(1) compliance with relevant departmental acquisition 
              policies and the Federal Acquisition Regulation; and
                  ``(2) the effective use of taxpayer dollars.''.
          (b) Clerical Amendment.--The table of contents in section 1(b) of 
      the Homeland Security Act of 2002 is amended by inserting after the 
      item relating to section 433 the following new item:
      
      ``Sec. 434. Border security technology program management.''.
          (c) Prohibition on Additional Authorization of Appropriations.--No 
      additional funds are authorized to be appropriated to carry out section 
      434 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, as added by subsection (a). 
      Such section shall be carried out using amounts otherwise authorized 
      for such purposes.
      
      SEC. 109. NATIONAL GUARD SUPPORT TO SECURE THE SOUTHERN BORDER AND 
                    REIMBURSEMENT OF STATES FOR DEPLOYMENT OF THE NATIONAL 
                    GUARD AT THE SOUTHERN BORDER.
      
          (a) In General.--With the approval of the Secretary of Defense, the 
      Secretary or the Governor of a State may order any units or personnel 
      of the National Guard of such State to perform operations and missions 
      under section 502(f) of title 32, United States Code, along the 
      southern border for the purposes of assisting U.S. Customs and Border 
      Protection to secure the southern border.
          (b) Assignment of Operations and Missions.--
                  (1) In general.--National Guard units and personnel 
              deployed under subsection (a) may be assigned such operations 
              and missions specified in subsection (c) as may be necessary to 
              secure the southern border.
                  (2) Nature of duty.--The duty of National Guard personnel 
              performing operations and missions described in paragraph (1) 
              shall be full-time duty under title 32, United States Code.
          (c) Range of Operations and Missions.--The operations and missions 
      assigned under subsection (b) shall include the temporary authority 
      to--
                  (1) construct reinforced fencing or other barriers;
                  (2) conduct ground-based surveillance systems;
                  (3) operate unmanned and manned aircraft;
                  (4) provide radio communications interoperability between 
              U.S. Customs and Border Protection and State, local, and tribal 
              law enforcement agencies; and
                  (5) construct checkpoints along the southern border to 
              bridge the gap to long-term permanent checkpoints.
          (d) Materiel and Logistical Support.--The Secretary of Defense 
      shall deploy such materiel, equipment, and logistical support as may be 
      necessary to ensure success of the operations and missions conducted by 
      the National Guard under this section.
          (e) Exclusion From National Guard Personnel Strength Limitations.--
      National Guard personnel deployed under subsection (a) shall not be 
      included in--
                  (1) the calculation to determine compliance with limits on 
              end strength for National Guard personnel; or
                  (2) limits on the number of National Guard personnel that 
              may be placed on active duty for operational support under 
              section 115 of title 10, United States Code.
          (f) Reimbursement Required.--
                  (1) In general.--The Secretary of Defense shall reimburse 
              States for the cost of the deployment of any units or personnel 
              of the National Guard to perform operations and missions in 
              full-time State Active Duty in support of a southern border 
              mission. The Secretary of Defense may not seek reimbursement 
              from the Secretary for any reimbursements paid to States for 
              the costs of such deployments.
                  (2) Limitation.--The total amount of reimbursements under 
              this section may not exceed $35,000,000 for any fiscal year.
      
      SEC. 110. OPERATION PHALANX.
      
          (a) In General.--The Secretary of Defense, with the concurrence of 
      the Secretary, shall provide assistance to U.S. Customs and Border 
      Protection for purposes of increasing ongoing efforts to secure the 
      southern border.
          (b) Types of Assistance Authorized.--The assistance provided under 
      subsection (a) may include--
                  (1) deployment of manned aircraft, unmanned aerial 
              surveillance systems, and ground-based surveillance systems to 
              support continuous surveillance of the southern border; and
                  (2) intelligence analysis support.
          (c) Materiel and Logistical Support.--The Secretary of Defense may 
      deploy such materiel, equipment, and logistics support as may be 
      necessary to ensure the effectiveness of the assistance provided under 
      subsection (a).
          (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
      appropriated for the Department of Defense $75,000,000 to provide 
      assistance under this section. The Secretary of Defense may not seek 
      reimbursement from the Secretary for any assistance provided under this 
      section.
          (e) Reports.--
                  (1) In general.--Not later than 90 days after the date of 
              the enactment of this Act and annually thereafter, the 
              Secretary of Defense shall submit a report to the appropriate 
              congressional defense committees (as defined in section 
              101(a)(16) of title 10, United States Code) regarding any 
              assistance provided under subsection (a) during the period 
              specified in paragraph (3).
                  (2) Elements.--Each report under paragraph (1) shall 
              include, for the period specified in paragraph (3), a 
              description of--
                          (A) the assistance provided;
                          (B) the sources and amounts of funds used to 
                      provide such assistance; and
                          (C) the amounts obligated to provide such 
                      assistance.
                  (3) Period specified.--The period specified in this 
              paragraph is--
                          (A) in the case of the first report required under 
                      paragraph (1), the 90-day period beginning on the date 
                      of the enactment of this Act; and
                          (B) in the case of any subsequent report submitted 
                      under paragraph (1), the calendar year for which the 
                      report is submitted.
      
      SEC. 111. MERIDA INITIATIVE.
      
          (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that assistance 
      to Mexico, including assistance from the Department of State and the 
      Department of Defense and any aid related to the Merida Initiative 
      should--
                  (1) focus on providing enhanced border security and 
              judicial reform and support for Mexico's drug crop eradication 
              efforts; and
                  (2) return to its original focus and prioritize security, 
              training, and acquisition of equipment for Mexican security 
              forces involved in drug crop eradication efforts.
          (b) Assistance for Mexico.--The Secretary of State, in coordination 
      with the Secretary and the Secretary of Defense, shall provide 
      assistance to Mexico to--
                  (1) combat drug trafficking and related violence, organized 
              crime, and corruption;
                  (2) build a modern border security system capable of 
              preventing illegal migration;
                  (3) support border security and cooperation with United 
              States law enforcement agencies on border incursions;
                  (4) support judicial reform, institution building, and rule 
              of law activities; and
                  (5) provide for training and equipment for Mexican security 
              forces involved in drug crop eradication efforts.
          (c) Allocation of Funds; Report.--
                  (1) In general.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
              law, 50 percent of any assistance appropriated in any 
              appropriations Act to implement this section shall be withheld 
              until after the Secretary of State submits a written report to 
              the congressional committees specified in paragraph (3) 
              certifying that the Government of Mexico is--
                          (A) significantly reducing illegal migration, drug 
                      trafficking, and cross-border criminal activities; and
                          (B) improving the transparency and accountability 
                      of Mexican Federal police forces and working with 
                      Mexican State and municipal authorities to improve the 
                      transparency and accountability of Mexican State and 
                      municipal police forces.
                  (2) Matters to include.--The report required under 
              paragraph (1) shall include a description of--
                          (A) actions taken by the Government of Mexico to 
                      address the matters described in such paragraph; and
                          (B) any instances in which the Secretary determines 
                      that the actions taken by the Government of Mexico are 
                      inadequate to address such matters.
                  (3) Congressional committees specified.--The congressional 
              committees specified in this paragraph are--
                          (A) the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate;
                          (B) the Committee on Homeland Security and 
                      Governmental Affairs of the Senate;
                          (C) the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate;
                          (D) the Committee on Appropriations of the House of 
                      Representatives;
                          (E) the Committee on Homeland Security of the House 
                      of Representatives; and
                          (F) the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
                      Representatives.
          (d) Notifications.--Any assistance made available by the Secretary 
      of State under this section shall be subject to--
                  (1) the notification procedures set forth in section 634A 
              of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2394-1); and
                  (2) the notification requirements of--
                          (A) the Committee on Homeland Security and 
                      Governmental Affairs of the Senate;
                          (B) the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate;
                          (C) the Committee on Homeland Security of the House 
                      of Representatives; and
                          (D) the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
                      Representatives.
          (e) Spending Plan.--
                  (1) In general.--Not later than 45 days after the date of 
              the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit 
              to the congressional committees specified in paragraph (2) a 
              detailed spending plan for assistance to Mexico under this 
              section, which shall include a strategy, developed after 
              consulting with relevant authorities of the Government of 
              Mexico, for--
                          (A) combating drug trafficking and related violence 
                      and organized crime; and
                          (B) anti-corruption and rule of law activities, 
                      which shall include concrete goals, actions to be 
                      taken, budget proposals, and a description of 
                      anticipated results.
                  (2) Congressional committees specified.--The congressional 
              committees specified in this paragraph are--
                          (A) the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate;
                          (B) the Committee on Foreign Relations of the 
                      Senate;
                          (C) the Committee on Homeland Security and 
                      Governmental Affairs of the Senate;
                          (D) the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate;
                          (E) the Committee on Appropriations of the House of 
                      Representatives;
                          (F) the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House 
                      of Representatives;
                          (G) the Committee on Homeland Security of the House 
                      of Representatives; and
                          (H) the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
                      Representatives.
      
      SEC. 112. PROHIBITIONS ON ACTIONS THAT IMPEDE BORDER SECURITY ON 
                    CERTAIN FEDERAL LAND.
      
          (a) Prohibition on Interference With U.S. Customs and Border 
      Protection.--
                  (1) In general.--The Secretary concerned shall not impede, 
              prohibit, or restrict activities of U.S. Customs and Border 
              Protection on covered Federal land to execute search and rescue 
              operations or to prevent all unlawful entries into the United 
              States, including entries by terrorists, other unlawful aliens, 
              instruments of terrorism, narcotics, and other contraband 
              through the southern border or the northern border.
                  (2) Applicability.--The authority of U.S. Customs and 
              Border Protection to conduct activities described in paragraph 
              (1) on covered Federal land applies without regard to whether a 
              state of emergency exists.
          (b) Authorized Activities of U.S. Customs and Border Protection.--
                  (1) In general.--U.S. Customs and Border Protection shall 
              have immediate access to covered Federal land to conduct the 
              activities described in paragraph (2) on such land to prevent 
              all unlawful entries into the United States, including entries 
              by terrorists, other unlawful aliens, instruments of terrorism, 
              narcotics, and other contraband through the southern border or 
              the northern border.
                  (2) Activities described.--The activities described in this 
              paragraph are--
                          (A) the use of vehicles to patrol the border area, 
                      apprehend illegal entrants, and rescue individuals; and
                          (B) the construction, installation, operation and 
                      maintenance of tactical infrastructure and border 
                      technology described in section 102 of the Illegal 
                      Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 
                      1996 (as amended by section 102 of this Act).
          (c) Clarification Relating to Waiver Authority.--
                  (1) In general.--The activities of U.S. Customs and Border 
              Protection described in subsection (b)(2) may be carried out 
              without regard to the provisions of law specified in paragraph 
              (2).
                  (2) Provisions of law specified.--The provisions of law 
              specified in this section are all Federal, State, or other 
              laws, regulations, and legal requirements of, deriving from, or 
              related to the subject of, the following laws:
                          (A) The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 
                      (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.).
                          (B) The Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 
                      1531 et seq.).
                          (C) The Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 
                      U.S.C. 1251 et seq.) (commonly referred to as the 
                      ``Clean Water Act'').
                          (D) Division A of subtitle III of title 54, United 
                      States Code (54 U.S.C. 300301 et seq.) (formerly known 
                      as the ``National Historic Preservation Act'').
                          (E) The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (16 U.S.C. 703 et 
                      seq.).
                          (F) The Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.).
                          (G) The Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 
                      1979 (16 U.S.C. 470aa et seq.).
                          (H) The Safe Drinking Water Act (42 U.S.C. 300f et 
                      seq.).
                          (I) The Noise Control Act of 1972 (42 U.S.C. 4901 
                      et seq.).
                          (J) The Solid Waste Disposal Act (42 U.S.C. 6901 et 
                      seq.).
                          (K) The Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
                      Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (42 U.S.C. 9601 
                      et seq.).
                          (L) Chapter 3125 of title 54, United States Code 
                      (formerly known as the ``Archaeological and Historic 
                      Preservation Act'').
                          (M) The Antiquities Act (16 U.S.C. 431 et seq.).
                          (N) Chapter 3203 of title 54, United States Code 
                      (formerly known as the ``Historic Sites, Buildings, and 
                      Antiquities Act'').
                          (O) The Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (16 U.S.C. 1271 
                      et seq.).
                          (P) The Farmland Protection Policy Act (7 U.S.C. 
                      4201 et seq.).
                          (Q) The Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972 (16 
                      U.S.C. 1451 et seq.).
                          (R) The Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.).
                          (S) The Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 
                      1976 (43 U.S.C. 1701 et seq.).
                          (T) The National Wildlife Refuge System 
                      Administration Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 668dd et seq.).
                          (U) The Fish and Wildlife Act of 1956 (16 U.S.C. 
                      742a et seq.).
                          (V) The Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act (16 
                      U.S.C. 661 et seq.).
                          (W) Subchapter II of chapter 5, and chapter 7, of 
                      title 5, United States Code (commonly known as the 
                      ``Administrative Procedure Act'').
                          (X) The Otay Mountain Wilderness Act of 1999 
                      (Public Law 106-145).
                          (Y) Sections 102(29) and 103 of the California 
                      Desert Protection Act of 1994 (Public Law 103-433).
                          (Z) Division A of subtitle I of title 54, United 
                      States Code (formerly known as the ``National Park 
                      Service Organic Act'').
                          (AA) The National Park Service General Authorities 
                      Act (Public Law 91-383, 16 U.S.C. 1a-1 et seq.).
                          (BB) Sections 401(7), 403, and 404 of the National 
                      Parks and Recreation Act of 1978 (Public Law 95-625).
                          (CC) Sections 301(a) through (f) of the Arizona 
                      Desert Wilderness Act (Public Law 101-628).
                          (DD) The Rivers and Harbors Act of 1899 (33 U.S.C. 
                      403).
                          (EE) The Eagle Protection Act (16 U.S.C. 668 et 
                      seq.).
                          (FF) The Native American Graves Protection and 
                      Repatriation Act (25 U.S.C. 3001 et seq.).
                          (GG) The American Indian Religious Freedom Act (42 
                      U.S.C. 1996).
                          (HH) The Religious Freedom Restoration Act (42 
                      U.S.C. 2000bb).
                          (II) The National Forest Management Act of 1976 (16 
                      U.S.C. 1600 et seq.).
                          (JJ) The Multiple Use and Sustained Yield Act of 
                      1960 (16 U.S.C. 528 et seq.).
                  (3) Applicability of waiver to successor laws.--If a 
              provision of law specified in paragraph (2) was repealed and 
              incorporated into title 54, United States Code, after April 1, 
              2008, and before the date of the enactment of this Act, the 
              waiver described in paragraph (1) shall apply to the provision 
              of such title that corresponds to the provision of law 
              specified in paragraph (2) to the same extent the waiver 
              applied to that provision of law.
          (d) Protection of Legal Uses.--This section may not be construed to 
      provide--
                  (1) authority to restrict legal uses, such as grazing, 
              hunting, mining, or recreation or the use of backcountry 
              airstrips, on land under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of 
              the Interior or the Secretary of Agriculture; or
                  (2) any additional authority to restrict legal access to 
              such land.
          (e) Effect on State and Private Land.--This section shall--
                  (1) have no force or effect on State lands or private 
              lands; and
                  (2) not provide authority on or access to State lands or 
              private lands.
          (f) Tribal Sovereignty.--Nothing in this section may be construed 
      to supersede, replace, negate, or diminish treaties or other agreements 
      between the United States and Indian tribes.
          (g) Definitions.--In this section:
                  (1) Covered federal land.--The term ``covered Federal 
              land'' includes all land under the control of the Secretary 
              concerned that is located within 100 miles of the southern 
              border or the northern border.
                  (2) Secretary concerned.--The term ``Secretary concerned'' 
              means--
                          (A) with respect to land under the jurisdiction of 
                      the Department of Agriculture, the Secretary of 
                      Agriculture; and
                          (B) with respect to land under the jurisdiction of 
                      the Department of the Interior, the Secretary of the 
                      Interior.
      
      SEC. 113. LANDOWNER AND RANCHER SECURITY ENHANCEMENT.
      
          (a) Establishment of National Border Security Advisory Committee.--
      The Secretary shall establish a National Border Security Advisory 
      Committee, which--
                  (1) may advise, consult with, report to, and make 
              recommendations to the Secretary on matters relating to border 
              security matters, including--
                          (A) verifying security claims and the border 
                      security metrics established by the Department of 
                      Homeland Security under section 1092 of the National 
                      Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
                      Law 114-328; 6 U.S.C. 223); and
                          (B) discussing ways to improve the security of high 
                      traffic areas along the northern border and the 
                      southern border; and
                  (2) may provide, through the Secretary, recommendations to 
              Congress.
          (b) Consideration of Views.--The Secretary shall consider the 
      information, advice, and recommendations of the National Border 
      Security Advisory Committee in formulating policy regarding matters 
      affecting border security.
          (c) Membership.--The National Border Security Advisory Committee 
      shall consist of at least one member from each State who--
                  (1) has at least five years practical experience in border 
              security operations; or
                  (2) lives and works in the United States within 80 miles 
              from the southern border or the northern border.
          (d) Nonapplicability of Federal Advisory Committee Act.--The 
      Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) shall not apply to the 
      National Border Security Advisory Committee.
      
      SEC. 114. ERADICATION OF CARRIZO CANE AND SALT CEDAR.
      
          Not later than January 20, 2021, the Secretary, after coordinating 
      with the heads of the relevant Federal, State, and local agencies, 
      shall begin eradicating the carrizo cane plant and any salt cedar along 
      the Rio Grande River.
      
      SEC. 115. SOUTHERN BORDER THREAT ANALYSIS.
      
          (a) Threat Analysis.--
                  (1) Requirement.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
              the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the 
              Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives 
              and the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs 
              of the Senate a southern border threat analysis.
                  (2) Contents.--The analysis submitted under paragraph (1) 
              shall include an assessment of--
                          (A) current and potential terrorism and criminal 
                      threats posed by individuals and organized groups 
                      seeking--
                                  (i) to unlawfully enter the United States 
                              through the southern border; or
                                  (ii) to exploit security vulnerabilities 
                              along the southern border;
                          (B) improvements needed at and between ports of 
                      entry along the southern border to prevent terrorists 
                      and instruments of terror from entering the United 
                      States;
                          (C) gaps in law, policy, and coordination between 
                      State, local, or tribal law enforcement, international 
                      agreements, or tribal agreements that hinder effective 
                      and efficient border security, counterterrorism, and 
                      anti-human smuggling and trafficking efforts;
                          (D) the current percentage of situational awareness 
                      achieved by the Department along the southern border;
                          (E) the current percentage of operational control 
                      (as defined in section 2 of the Secure Fence Act of 
                      2006 (8 U.S.C. 1701 note)) achieved by the Department 
                      on the southern border; and
                          (F) traveler crossing times and any potential 
                      security vulnerability associated with prolonged wait 
                      times.
                  (3) Analysis requirements.--In compiling the southern 
              border threat analysis required under this subsection, the 
              Secretary shall consider and examine--
                          (A) the technology needs and challenges, including 
                      such needs and challenges identified as a result of 
                      previous investments that have not fully realized the 
                      security and operational benefits that were sought;
                          (B) the personnel needs and challenges, including 
                      such needs and challenges associated with recruitment 
                      and hiring;
                          (C) the infrastructure needs and challenges;
                          (D) the roles and authorities of State, local, and 
                      tribal law enforcement in general border security 
                      activities;
                          (E) the status of coordination among Federal, 
                      State, local, tribal, and Mexican law enforcement 
                      entities relating to border security;
                          (F) the terrain, population density, and climate 
                      along the southern border; and
                          (G) the international agreements between the United 
                      States and Mexico related to border security.
                  (4) Classified form.--To the extent possible, the Secretary 
              shall submit the southern border threat analysis required under 
              this subsection in unclassified form, but may submit a portion 
              of the threat analysis in classified form if the Secretary 
              determines such action is appropriate.
          (b) U.S. Border Patrol Strategic Plan.--
                  (1) In general.--Not later than the later of 180 days after 
              the submission of the threat analysis required under subsection 
              (a) or June 30, 2018, and every five years thereafter, the 
              Secretary, acting through the Chief of the U.S. Border Patrol, 
              and in consultation with the Office for Civil Rights and Civil 
              Liberties of the Department, shall issue a Border Patrol 
              Strategic Plan.
                  (2) Contents.--The Border Patrol Strategic Plan required 
              under this subsection shall include a consideration of--
                          (A) the southern border threat analysis required 
                      under subsection (a), with an emphasis on efforts to 
                      mitigate threats identified in such threat analysis;
                          (B) efforts to analyze and disseminate border 
                      security and border threat information between border 
                      security components of the Department and other 
                      appropriate Federal departments and agencies with 
                      missions associated with the southern border;
                          (C) efforts to increase situational awareness, 
                      including--
                                  (i) surveillance capabilities, including 
                              capabilities developed or utilized by the 
                              Department of Defense, and any appropriate 
                              technology determined to be excess by the 
                              Department of Defense; and
                                  (ii) the use of manned aircraft and 
                              unmanned aerial systems, including camera and 
                              sensor technology deployed on such assets;
                          (D) efforts to detect and prevent terrorists and 
                      instruments of terrorism from entering the United 
                      States;
                          (E) efforts to detect, interdict, and disrupt 
                      aliens and illicit drugs at the earliest possible 
                      point;
                          (F) efforts to focus intelligence collection to 
                      disrupt transnational criminal organizations outside of 
                      the international and maritime borders of the United 
                      States;
                          (G) efforts to ensure that any new border security 
                      technology can be operationally integrated with 
                      existing technologies in use by the Department;
                          (H) any technology required to maintain, support, 
                      and enhance security and facilitate trade at ports of 
                      entry, including nonintrusive detection equipment, 
                      radiation detection equipment, biometric technology, 
                      surveillance systems, and other sensors and technology 
                      that the Secretary determines to be necessary;
                          (I) operational coordination unity of effort 
                      initiatives of the border security components of the 
                      Department, including any relevant task forces of the 
                      Department;
                          (J) lessons learned from Operation Jumpstart and 
                      Operation Phalanx;
                          (K) cooperative agreements and information sharing 
                      with State, local, tribal, territorial, and other 
                      Federal law enforcement agencies that have jurisdiction 
                      on the northern border or the southern border;
                          (L) border security information received from 
                      consultation with State, local, tribal, territorial, 
                      and Federal law enforcement agencies that have 
                      jurisdiction on the northern border or the southern 
                      border, or in the maritime environment, and from border 
                      community stakeholders (including through public 
                      meetings with such stakeholders), including 
                      representatives from border agricultural and ranching 
                      organizations and representatives from business and 
                      civic organizations along the northern border or the 
                      southern border;
                          (M) staffing requirements for all departmental 
                      border security functions;
                          (N) a prioritized list of departmental research and 
                      development objectives to enhance the security of the 
                      southern border;
                          (O) an assessment of training programs, including 
                      training programs for--
                                  (i) identifying and detecting fraudulent 
                              documents;
                                  (ii) understanding the scope of enforcement 
                              authorities and the use of force policies; and
                                  (iii) screening, identifying, and 
                              addressing vulnerable populations, such as 
                              children and victims of human trafficking; and
                          (P) an assessment of how border security operations 
                      affect border crossing times.
      
                               Subtitle B--Personnel
      
      SEC. 131. ADDITIONAL U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION AGENTS AND 
                    OFFICERS.
      
          (a) Border Patrol Agents.--Not later than September 30, 2021, the 
      Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection shall hire, train, 
      and assign sufficient agents to maintain an active duty presence of not 
      fewer than 26,370 full-time equivalent agents.
          (b) CBP Officers.--In addition to positions authorized before the 
      date of the enactment of this Act and any existing officer vacancies 
      within U.S. Customs and Border Protection as of such date, the 
      Commissioner, subject to the availability of appropriations, shall 
      hire, train, and assign to duty, not later than September 30, 2021--
                  (1) sufficient U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers 
              to maintain an active duty presence of not fewer than 27,725 
              full-time equivalent officers; and
                  (2) 350 full-time support staff distributed among all 
              United States ports of entry.
          (c) Air and Marine Operations.--Not later than September 30, 2021, 
      the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection shall hire, 
      train, and assign sufficient agents for Air and Marine Operations of 
      U.S. Customs and Border Protection to maintain not fewer than 1,675 
      full-time equivalent agents.
          (d) U.S. Customs and Border Protection K-9 Units and Handlers.--
                  (1) K-9 units.--Not later than September 30, 2021, the 
              Commissioner shall deploy not fewer than 300 new K-9 units, 
              with supporting officers of U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
              and other required staff, at land ports of entry and 
              checkpoints, on the southern border and the northern border.
                  (2) Use of canines.--The Commissioner shall prioritize the 
              use of canines at the primary inspection lanes at land ports of 
              entry and checkpoints.
          (e) U.S. Customs and Border Protection Horseback Units.--
                  (1) Increase.--Not later than September 30, 2021, the 
              Commissioner shall increase the number of horseback units, with 
              supporting officers of U.S. Customs and Border Protection and 
              other required staff, by not fewer than 100 officers and 50 
              horses for security patrol along the southern border.
                  (2) Funding limitation.--Of the amounts authorized to be 
              appropriated for U.S. Customs and Border Protection under this 
              Act, not more than one percent may be used for the purchase of 
              additional horses, the construction of new stables, maintenance 
              and improvements of existing stables, and for feed, medicine, 
              and other resources needed to maintain the health and well-
              being of the horses that serve in the horseback units.
          (f) U.S. Customs and Border Protection Search Trauma and Rescue 
      Teams.--Not later than September 30, 2021, the Commissioner shall 
      increase by not fewer than 50 the number of officers engaged in search 
      and rescue activities along the southern border.
          (g) U.S. Customs and Border Protection Tunnel Detection and 
      Technology Program.--Not later than September 30, 2021, the 
      Commissioner shall increase by not fewer than 50 the number of officers 
      assisting task forces and activities related to deployment and 
      operation of border tunnel detection technology and apprehensions of 
      individuals using such tunnels for crossing into the United States, 
      drug trafficking, or human smuggling.
          (h) Agricultural Specialists.--Not later than September 30, 2021, 
      the Secretary shall hire, train, and assign to duty, in addition to the 
      officers and agents authorized under subsections (a) through (g), 631 
      U.S. Customs and Border Protection agricultural specialists to ports of 
      entry along the southern border and the northern border.
          (i) GAO Report.--If the staffing levels required under this section 
      are not achieved by September 30, 2021, the Comptroller General of the 
      United States shall conduct a review of the reasons why such levels 
      were not achieved.
      
      SEC. 132. U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION RETENTION INCENTIVES.
      
          (a) Definitions.--In this section:
                  (1) Covered area.--The term ``covered area'' means a 
              geographic area that the Secretary determines is in a remote 
              location or is an area for which it is difficult to find full-
              time permanent covered CBP employees, as compared to other 
              ports of entry or Border Patrol sectors.
                  (2) Covered cbp employee.--The term ``covered CBP 
              employee'' means an employee of U.S. Customs and Border 
              Protection performing activities that are critical to border 
              security or customs enforcement, as determined by the 
              Commissioner.
                  (3) Rate of basic pay.--The term ``rate of basic pay''--
                          (A) means the rate of pay fixed by law or 
                      administrative action for the position to which an 
                      employee is appointed before deductions and including 
                      any special rate under subpart C of part 530 of title 
                      5, Code of Federal Regulations, or similar payment 
                      under other legal authority, and any locality-based 
                      comparability payment under subpart F of part 531 of 
                      title 5, Code of Federal Regulations, or similar 
                      payment under other legal authority, but excluding 
                      additional pay of any other kind; and
                          (B) does not include additional pay, such as night 
                      shift differentials under section 5343(f) of title 5, 
                      United States Code, or environmental differentials 
                      under section 5343(c)(4) of such title.
                  (4) Special rate of pay.--The term ``special rate of pay'' 
              means a higher than normal rate of pay that exceeds the 
              otherwise applicable rate of basic pay for a similar covered 
              CBP employee at a land port of entry.
          (b) Hiring Incentives.--
                  (1) In general.--To the extent necessary for U.S. Customs 
              and Border Protection to hire, train, and deploy qualified 
              officers and employees, and to the extent necessary to meet the 
              requirements set forth in section 131, the Commissioner, with 
              the approval of the Secretary, may pay a hiring bonus of 
              $10,000 to a covered CBP employee, after the covered CBP 
              completes initial basic training and executes a written 
              agreement required under paragraph (2).
                  (2) Written agreement.--The payment of a hiring bonus to a 
              covered CBP employee under paragraph (1) is contingent upon the 
              covered CBP employee entering into a written agreement with 
              U.S. Customs and Border Protection to complete more than two 
              years of employment with U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
              beginning on the date on which the agreement is signed. Such 
              agreement shall include--
                          (A) the amount of the hiring bonus;
                          (B) the conditions under which the agreement may be 
                      terminated before the required period of service is 
                      completed and the effect of such termination;
                          (C) the length of the required service period; and
                          (D) any other terms and conditions under which the 
                      hiring bonus is payable, subject to the requirements 
                      under this section.
                  (3) Form of payment.--A signing bonus paid to a covered CBP 
              employee under paragraph (1) shall be paid in a single payment 
              after the covered CBP employee completes initial basic training 
              and enters on duty and executed the agreement under paragraph 
              (2).
                  (4) Exclusion of signing bonus from rate of pay.--A signing 
              bonus paid to a covered CBP employee under paragraph (1) shall 
              not be considered part of the rate of basic pay of the covered 
              CBP employee for any purpose.
                  (5) Effective date and sunset.--This subsection shall take 
              effect on the date of the enactment of this Act and shall 
              remain in effect until the earlier of--
                          (A) September 30, 2019; or
                          (B) the date on which U.S. Customs and Border 
                      Protection has 26,370 full-time equivalent agents.
          (c) Retention Incentives.--
                  (1) In general.--To the extent necessary for U.S. Customs 
              and Border Protection to retain qualified employees, and to the 
              extent necessary to meet the requirements set forth in section 
              131, the Commissioner, with the approval of the Secretary, may 
              pay a retention incentive to a covered CBP employee who has 
              been employed with U.S. Customs and Border Protection for a 
              period of longer than two consecutive years, and the 
              Commissioner determines that, in the absence of the retention 
              incentive, the covered CBP employee would likely--
                          (A) leave the Federal service; or
                          (B) transfer to, or be hired into, a different 
                      position within the Department (other than another 
                      position in CBP).
                  (2) Written agreement.--The payment of a retention 
              incentive to a covered CBP employee under paragraph (1) is 
              contingent upon the covered CBP employee entering into a 
              written agreement with U.S. Customs and Border Protection to 
              complete more than two years of employment with U.S. Customs 
              and Border Protection beginning on the date on which the CBP 
              employee enters on duty and the agreement is signed. Such 
              agreement shall include--
                          (A) the amount of the retention incentive;
                          (B) the conditions under which the agreement may be 
                      terminated before the required period of service is 
                      completed and the effect of such termination;
                          (C) the length of the required service period; and
                          (D) any other terms and conditions under which the 
                      retention incentive is payable, subject to the 
                      requirements under this section.
                  (3) Criteria.--When determining the amount of a retention 
              incentive paid to a covered CBP employee under paragraph (1), 
              the Commissioner shall consider--
                          (A) the length of the Federal service and 
                      experience of the covered CBP employee;
                          (B) the salaries for law enforcement officers in 
                      other Federal agencies; and
                          (C) the costs of replacing the covered CBP 
                      employee, including the costs of training a new 
                      employee.
                  (4) Amount of retention incentive.--A retention incentive 
              paid to a covered CBP employee under paragraph (1)--
                          (A) shall be approved by the Secretary and the 
                      Commissioner;
                          (B) shall be stated as a percentage of the 
                      employee's rate of basic pay for the service period 
                      associated with the incentive; and
                          (C) may not exceed $25,000 for each year of the 
                      written agreement.
                  (5) Form of payment.--A retention incentive paid to a 
              covered CBP employee under paragraph (1) shall be paid as a 
              single payment at the end of the fiscal year in which the 
              covered CBP employee entered into an agreement under paragraph 
              (2), or in equal installments during the life of the service 
              agreement, as determined by the Commissioner.
                  (6) Exclusion of retention incentive from rate of pay.--A 
              retention incentive paid to a covered CBP employee under 
              paragraph (1) shall not be considered part of the rate of basic 
              pay of the covered CBP employee for any purpose.
          (d) Pilot Program on Special Rates of Pay in Covered Areas.--
                  (1) In general.--The Commissioner may establish a pilot 
              program to assess the feasibility and advisability of using 
              special rates of pay for covered CBP employees in covered 
              areas, as designated on the date of the enactment of this Act, 
              to help meet the requirements set forth in section 131.
                  (2) Maximum amount.--The rate of basic pay of a covered CBP 
              employee paid a special rate of pay under the pilot program may 
              not exceed 125 percent of the otherwise applicable rate of 
              basic pay of the covered CBP employee.
                  (3) Termination.--
                          (A) In general.--Except as provided in subparagraph 
                      (B), the pilot program shall terminate on the date that 
                      is two years after the date of the enactment of this 
                      Act.
                          (B) Extension.--If the Secretary determines that 
                      the pilot program is performing satisfactorily and 
                      there are metrics that prove its success in meeting the 
                      requirements set forth in section 131, the Secretary 
                      may extend the pilot program until the date that is 
                      four years after the date of the enactment of this Act.
                  (4) Report to congress.--Shortly after the pilot program 
              terminates under paragraph (3), the Commissioner shall submit a 
              report to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
              Affairs of the Senate, the Committee on the Judiciary of the 
              Senate, the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of 
              Representatives, and the Committee on the Judiciary of the 
              House of Representatives that details--
                          (A) the total amount paid to covered CBP employees 
                      under the pilot program; and
                          (B) the covered areas in which the pilot program 
                      was implemented.
          (e) Salaries.--
                  (1) In general.--Section 101(b) of the Enhanced Border 
              Security and Visa Entry Reform Act of 2002 (8 U.S.C. 1711(b)) 
              is amended to read as follows:
          ``(b) Authorization of Appropriations for CBP Employees.--There are 
      authorized to be appropriated to U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
      such sums as may be necessary to increase, effective January 1, 2018, 
      the annual rate of basic pay for U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
      employees who have completed at least one year of service--
                  ``(1) to the annual rate of basic pay payable for positions 
              at GS-12, step 1 of the General Schedule under subchapter III 
              of chapter 53 of title 5, United States Code, for officers and 
              agents who are receiving the annual rate of basic pay payable 
              for a position at GS-5, GS-6, GS-7, GS-8, or GS-9 of the 
              General Schedule;
                  ``(2) to the annual rate of basic pay payable for positions 
              at GS-12, step 10 of the General Schedule under such subchapter 
              for supervisory CBP officers and supervisory agents who are 
              receiving the annual rate of pay payable for a position at GS-
              10 of the General Schedule;
                  ``(3) to the annual rate of basic pay payable for positions 
              at GS-14, step 1 of the General Schedule under such subchapter 
              for supervisory CBP officers and supervisory agents who are 
              receiving the annual rate of pay payable for a position at GS-
              11 of the General Schedule;
                  ``(4) to the annual rate of basic pay payable for positions 
              at GS-12, step 10 of the General Schedule under such subchapter 
              for supervisory CBP officers and supervisory Border Patrol 
              agents who are receiving the annual rate of pay payable for a 
              position at GS-12 or GS-13 of the General Schedule; and
                  ``(5) to the annual rate of basic pay payable for positions 
              at GS-8, GS-9, or GS-10 of the General Schedule for assistants 
              who are receiving an annual rate of pay payable for positions 
              at GS-5, GS-6, or GS-7 of the General Schedule, 
              respectively.''.
                  (2) Hardship duty pay.--In addition to compensation to 
              which Border Patrol agents are otherwise entitled, Border 
              Patrol agents who are assigned to rural areas shall be entitled 
              to receive hardship duty pay, in lieu of a retention incentive 
              under subsection (b), in an amount determined by the 
              Commissioner, which may not exceed the rate of special pay to 
              which members of a uniformed service are entitled under section 
              310 of title 37, United States Code.
                  (3) Overtime limitation.--Section 5(c)(1) of the Act of 
              February 13, 1911 (19 U.S.C. 267(c)(1)), is amended by striking 
              ``$25,000'' and inserting ``$45,000''.
      
      SEC. 133. ANTI-BORDER CORRUPTION REAUTHORIZATION ACT.
      
          (a) Short Title.--This section may be cited as the ``Anti-Border 
      Corruption Reauthorization Act of 2017''.
          (b) Hiring Flexibility.--Section 3 of the Anti-Border Corruption 
      Act of 2010 (6 U.S.C. 221) is amended by striking subsection (b) and 
      inserting the following new subsections:
          ``(b) Waiver Authority.--The Commissioner of U.S. Customs and 
      Border Protection may waive the application of subsection (a)(1)--
                  ``(1) to a current, full-time law enforcement officer 
              employed by a State or local law enforcement agency who--
                          ``(A) has continuously served as a law enforcement 
                      officer for not fewer than three years;
                          ``(B) is authorized by law to engage in or 
                      supervise the prevention, detection, investigation, or 
                      prosecution of, or the incarceration of any person for, 
                      any violation of law, and has statutory powers for 
                      arrest or apprehension;
                          ``(C) is not currently under investigation, has not 
                      been found to have engaged in criminal activity or 
                      serious misconduct, has not resigned from a law 
                      enforcement officer position under investigation or in 
                      lieu of termination, and has not been dismissed from a 
                      law enforcement officer position; and
                          ``(D) has, within the past ten years, successfully 
                      completed a polygraph examination as a condition of 
                      employment with such officer's current law enforcement 
                      agency;
                  ``(2) to a current, full-time Federal law enforcement 
              officer who--
                          ``(A) has continuously served as a law enforcement 
                      officer for not fewer than three years;
                          ``(B) is authorized to make arrests, conduct 
                      investigations, conduct searches, make seizures, carry 
                      firearms, and serve orders, warrants, and other 
                      processes;
                          ``(C) is not currently under investigation, has not 
                      been found to have engaged in criminal activity or 
                      serious misconduct, has not resigned from a law 
                      enforcement officer position under investigation or in 
                      lieu of termination, and has not been dismissed from a 
                      law enforcement officer position; and
                          ``(D) holds a current Tier 4 background 
                      investigation or current Tier 5 background 
                      investigation; and
                  ``(3) to a member of the Armed Forces (or a reserve 
              component thereof) or a veteran, if such individual--
                          ``(A) has served in the Armed Forces for not fewer 
                      than three years;
                          ``(B) holds, or has held within the past five 
                      years, a Secret, Top Secret, or Top Secret/Sensitive 
                      Compartmented Information clearance;
                          ``(C) holds, or has undergone within the past five 
                      years, a current Tier 4 background investigation or 
                      current Tier 5 background investigation;
                          ``(D) received, or is eligible to receive, an 
                      honorable discharge from service in the Armed Forces 
                      and has not engaged in criminal activity or committed a 
                      serious military or civil offense under the Uniform 
                      Code of Military Justice; and
                          ``(E) was not granted any waivers to obtain the 
                      clearance referred to subparagraph (B).
          ``(c) Termination of Waiver Authority.--The authority to issue a 
      waiver under subsection (b) shall terminate on the date that is four 
      years after the date of the enactment of the Border Security for 
      America Act of 2017.''.
          (c) Supplemental Commissioner Authority and Definitions.--
                  (1) Supplemental commissioner authority.--Section 4 of the 
              Anti-Border Corruption Act of 2010 is amended to read as 
              follows:
      
      ``SEC. 4. SUPPLEMENTAL COMMISSIONER AUTHORITY.
      
          ``(a) Nonexemption.--An individual who receives a waiver under 
      section 3(b) is not exempt from other hiring requirements relating to 
      suitability for employment and eligibility to hold a national security 
      designated position, as determined by the Commissioner of U.S. Customs 
      and Border Protection.
          ``(b) Background Investigations.--Any individual who receives a 
      waiver under section 3(b) who holds a current Tier 4 background 
      investigation shall be subject to a Tier 5 background investigation.
          ``(c) Administration of Polygraph Examination.--The Commissioner of 
      U.S. Customs and Border Protection is authorized to administer a 
      polygraph examination to an applicant or employee who is eligible for 
      or receives a waiver under section 3(b) if information is discovered 
      before the completion of a background investigation that results in a 
      determination that a polygraph examination is necessary to make a final 
      determination regarding suitability for employment or continued 
      employment, as the case may be.''.
                  (2) Report.--The Anti-Border Corruption Act of 2010, as 
              amended by paragraph (1), is further amended by adding at the 
              end the following new section:
      
      ``SEC. 5. REPORTING.
      
          ``(a) Annual Report.--Not later than one year after the date of the 
      enactment of this section and annually thereafter while the waiver 
      authority under section 3(b) is in effect, the Commissioner of U.S. 
      Customs and Border Protection shall submit to Congress a report that 
      includes, with respect to each such reporting period--
                  ``(1) the number of waivers requested, granted, and denied 
              under section 3(b);
                  ``(2) the reasons for any denials of such waiver;
                  ``(3) the percentage of applicants who were hired after 
              receiving a waiver;
                  ``(4) the number of instances that a polygraph was 
              administered to an applicant who initially received a waiver 
              and the results of such polygraph;
                  ``(5) an assessment of the current impact of the polygraph 
              waiver program on filling law enforcement positions at U.S. 
              Customs and Border Protection; and
                  ``(6) additional authorities needed by U.S. Customs and 
              Border Protection to better utilize the polygraph waiver 
              program for its intended goals.
          ``(b) Additional Information.--The first report submitted under 
      subsection (a) shall include--
                  ``(1) an analysis of other methods of employment 
              suitability tests that detect deception and could be used in 
              conjunction with traditional background investigations to 
              evaluate potential employees for suitability; and
                  ``(2) a recommendation regarding whether a test referred to 
              in paragraph (1) should be adopted by U.S. Customs and Border 
              Protection when the polygraph examination requirement is waived 
              pursuant to section 3(b).''.
                  (3) Definitions.--The Anti-Border Corruption Act of 2010, 
              as amended by paragraphs (1) and (2), is further amended by 
              adding at the end the following new section:
      
      ``SEC. 6. DEFINITIONS.
      
          ``In this Act:
                  ``(1) Federal law enforcement officer.--The term `Federal 
              law enforcement officer' means a `law enforcement officer' 
              defined in section 8331(20) or 8401(17) of title 5, United 
              States Code.
                  ``(2) Serious military or civil offense.--The term `serious 
              military or civil offense' means an offense for which--
                          ``(A) a member of the Armed Forces may be 
                      discharged or separated from service in the Armed 
                      Forces; and
                          ``(B) a punitive discharge is, or would be, 
                      authorized for the same or a closely related offense 
                      under the Manual for Court-Martial, as pursuant to Army 
                      Regulation 635-200 chapter 14-12.
                  ``(3) Tier 4; tier 5.--The terms `Tier 4' and `Tier 5' with 
              respect to background investigations have the meaning given 
              such terms under the 2012 Federal Investigative Standards.
                  ``(4) Veteran.--The term `veteran' has the meaning given 
              such term in section 101(2) of title 38, United States Code.''.
          (d) Polygraph Examiners.--Not later than September 30, 2021, the 
      Secretary shall increase to not fewer than 150 the number of trained 
      full-time equivalent polygraph examiners for administering polygraphs 
      under the Anti-Border Corruption Act of 2010.
      
                                 Subtitle C--Grants
      
      SEC. 141. OPERATION STONEGARDEN.
      
          (a) In General.--Subtitle A of title XX of the Homeland Security 
      Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the 
      following new section:
      
      ``SEC. 2009. OPERATION STONEGARDEN.
      
          ``(a) Establishment.--There is established in the Department a 
      program to be known as `Operation Stonegarden', under which the 
      Secretary, acting through the Administrator, shall make grants to 
      eligible law enforcement agencies, through the State administrative 
      agency, to enhance border security in accordance with this section.
          ``(b) Eligible Recipients.--To be eligible to receive a grant under 
      this section, a law enforcement agency--
                  ``(1) shall be located in--
                          ``(A) a State bordering Canada or Mexico; or
                          ``(B) a State or territory with a maritime border; 
                      and
                  ``(2) shall be involved in an active, ongoing, U.S. Customs 
              and Border Protection operation coordinated through a sector 
              office.
          ``(c) Permitted Uses.--The recipient of a grant under this section 
      may use such grant for--
                  ``(1) equipment, including maintenance and sustainment 
              costs;
                  ``(2) personnel, including overtime and backfill, in 
              support of enhanced border law enforcement activities;
                  ``(3) any activity permitted for Operation Stonegarden 
              under the Department of Homeland Security's Fiscal Year 2017 
              Homeland Security Grant Program Notice of Funding Opportunity; 
              and
                  ``(4) any other appropriate activity, as determined by the 
              Administrator, in consultation with the Commissioner of U.S. 
              Customs and Border Protection.
          ``(d) Period of Performance.--The Secretary shall award grants 
      under this section to grant recipients for a period of not less than 36 
      months.
          ``(e) Report.--For each of the fiscal years 2018 through 2022, the 
      Administrator shall submit to the Committee on Homeland Security and 
      Governmental Affairs of the Senate and the Committee on Homeland 
      Security of the House of Representatives a report that contains 
      information on the expenditure of grants made under this section by 
      each grant recipient.
          ``(f) Authorization of Appropriations.--There is authorized to be 
      appropriated $110,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2018 through 
      2022 for grants under this section.''.
          (b) Conforming Amendment.--Subsection (a) of section 2002 of the 
      Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 603) is amended to read as 
      follows:
          ``(a) Grants Authorized.--The Secretary, through the Administrator, 
      may award grants under sections 2003, 2004, and 2009 to State, local, 
      and tribal governments, as appropriate.''.
          (c) Clerical Amendment.--The table of contents in section 1(b) of 
      the Homeland Security Act of 2002 is amended by inserting after the 
      item relating to section 2008 the following:
      
      ``Sec. 2009. Operation Stonegarden.''.
      
                    Subtitle D--Authorization of Appropriations
      
      SEC. 151. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.
      
          (a) In General.--In addition to amounts otherwise authorized to be 
      appropriated, there are authorized to be appropriated for each of the 
      fiscal years 2018 through 2021, $2,500,000,000 to implement this title 
      and the amendments made by this title, of which--
                  (1) $10,000,000 shall be used by the Department of Homeland 
              Security to implement Vehicle and Dismount Exploitation Radars 
              (VADER) in border security operations; and
                  (2) $200,000,000 shall be used by the Department of State 
              to implement section 111.
          (b) High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Program.--Section 
      707(p)(5) of the Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization 
      Act of 1998 (21 U.S.C. 1706(p)(5)) is amended by striking ``to the 
      Office of National Drug Control Policy'' and all that follows and 
      inserting ``$280,000,000 to the Office of National Drug Control Policy 
      for each of fiscal years 2018 through 2021 to carry out this 
      section.''.
      
       TITLE II--EMERGENCY PORT OF ENTRY PERSONNEL AND INFRASTRUCTURE FUNDING
      
      SEC. 201. PORTS OF ENTRY INFRASTRUCTURE.
      
          (a) Additional Ports of Entry.--
                  (1) Authority.--The Secretary may construct new ports of 
              entry along the northern border and southern border and 
              determine the location of any such new ports of entry.
                  (2) Consultation.--
                          (A) Requirement to consult.--The Secretary shall 
                      consult with the Secretary of the Interior, the 
                      Secretary of Agriculture, the Administrator of General 
                      Services, and appropriate representatives of State and 
                      local governments, and Indian tribes, and property 
                      owners in the United States prior to selecting a 
                      location for any new port constructed pursuant to 
                      paragraph (1).
                          (B) Considerations.--The purpose of the 
                      consultations required by subparagraph (A) shall be to 
                      minimize any negative impacts of such a new port on the 
                      environment, culture, commerce, and quality of life of 
                      the communities and residents located near such new 
                      port.
          (b) Expansion and Modernization of High-Volume Southern Border 
      Ports of Entry.--Not later than September 30, 2021, the Secretary shall 
      expand the primary and secondary inspection lanes for vehicle, cargo, 
      and pedestrian inbound and outbound inspection lanes at the top ten 
      high-volume ports of entry on the southern border, as determined by the 
      Secretary.
          (c) Port of Entry Prioritization.--Prior to constructing any new 
      ports of entry pursuant to subsection (a), the Secretary shall complete 
      the expansion and modernization of ports of entry pursuant to 
      subsection (b) to the extent practicable.
      
      SEC. 202. SECURE COMMUNICATIONS.
      
          (a) In General.--The Secretary shall ensure that each U.S. Customs 
      and Border Protection and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement 
      officer or agent, if appropriate, is equipped with a secure two-way 
      communication device, supported by system interoperability and LTE 
      network capability, that allows each such officer to communicate--
                  (1) between ports of entry and inspection stations; and
                  (2) with other Federal, State, tribal, and local law 
              enforcement entities.
          (b) Land Border Agents and Officers.--The Secretary shall ensure 
      that each U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent or officer assigned 
      or required to patrol on foot, by horseback, or with a canine unit, in 
      remote mission critical locations, including the Rio Grand Valley and 
      Big Bend, and at border checkpoints, has a multiband, encrypted 
      portable radio with military-grade high frequency capability to allow 
      for beyond line-of-sight communications.
      
      SEC. 203. BORDER SECURITY DEPLOYMENT PROGRAM.
      
          (a) Expansion.--Not later than September 30, 2021, the Secretary 
      shall fully implement the Border Security Deployment Program of the 
      U.S. Customs and Border Protection and expand the integrated 
      surveillance and intrusion detection system at land ports of entry 
      along the southern border and the northern border.
          (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--In addition to amounts 
      otherwise authorized to be appropriated for such purpose, there is 
      authorized to be appropriated $33,000,000 for fiscal year 2018 to carry 
      out subsection (a).
      
      SEC. 204. PILOT AND UPGRADE OF LICENSE PLATE READERS AT PORTS OF ENTRY.
      
          (a) Upgrade.--Not later than one year after the date of the 
      enactment of this Act, the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border 
      Protection shall upgrade all existing license plate readers on the 
      northern and southern borders on incoming and outgoing vehicle lanes.
          (b) Pilot Program.--Not later than 90 days after the date of the 
      enactment of this Act, the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border 
      Protection shall conduct a one-month pilot program on the southern 
      border using license plate readers for one to two cargo lanes at the 
      top three high-volume land ports of entry or checkpoints to determine 
      their effectiveness in reducing cross-border wait times for commercial 
      traffic and tractor-trailers.
          (c) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
      enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall report to the Committee on 
      Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of the Senate, the Committee 
      on the Judiciary of the Senate, the Committee on Homeland Security of 
      the House of Representatives, and the Committee on the Judiciary of the 
      House of Representatives the results of the pilot program under 
      subsection (b) and make recommendations for implementing use of such 
      technology on the southern border.
          (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--In addition to amounts 
      otherwise authorized to be appropriated for such purpose, there is 
      authorized to be appropriated $125,000,000 for fiscal year 2018 to 
      carry out subsection (a).
      
      SEC. 205. BIOMETRIC EXIT DATA SYSTEM.
      
          (a) In General.--Subtitle B of title IV of the Homeland Security 
      Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 211 et seq.) is amended by inserting after 
      section 417 the following new section:
      
      ``SEC. 418. BIOMETRIC ENTRY-EXIT.
      
          ``(a) Establishment.--The Secretary shall--
                  ``(1) not later than 180 days after the date of the 
              enactment of this section, submit to the Committee on Homeland 
              Security and Governmental Affairs and the Committee on the 
              Judiciary of the Senate and the Committee on Homeland Security 
              and the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
              Representatives an implementation plan to establish a biometric 
              exit data system to complete the integrated biometric entry and 
              exit data system required under section 7208 of the 
              Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (8 
              U.S.C. 1365b), including--
                          ``(A) an integrated master schedule and cost 
                      estimate, including requirements and design, 
                      development, operational, and maintenance costs of such 
                      a system, that takes into account prior reports on such 
                      matters issued by the Government Accountability Office 
                      and the Department;
                          ``(B) cost-effective staffing and personnel 
                      requirements of such a system that leverages existing 
                      resources of the Department that takes into account 
                      prior reports on such matters issued by the Government 
                      Accountability Office and the Department;
                          ``(C) a consideration of training programs 
                      necessary to establish such a system that takes into 
                      account prior reports on such matters issued by the 
                      Government Accountability Office and the Department;
                          ``(D) a consideration of how such a system will 
                      affect wait times that takes into account prior reports 
                      on such matter issued by the Government Accountability 
                      Office and the Department;
                          ``(E) information received after consultation with 
                      private sector stakeholders, including the--
                                  ``(i) trucking industry;
                                  ``(ii) airport industry;
                                  ``(iii) airline industry;
                                  ``(iv) seaport industry;
                                  ``(v) travel industry; and
                                  ``(vi) biometric technology industry;
                          ``(F) a consideration of how trusted traveler 
                      programs in existence as of the date of the enactment 
                      of this Act may be impacted by, or incorporated into, 
                      such a system;
                          ``(G) defined metrics of success and milestones;
                          ``(H) identified risks and mitigation strategies to 
                      address such risks; and
                          ``(I) a consideration of how other countries have 
                      implemented a biometric exit data system; and
                  ``(2) not later than two years after the date of the 
              enactment of this section, establish a biometric exit data 
              system at the--
                          ``(A) 15 United States airports that support the 
                      highest volume of international air travel, as 
                      determined by available Federal flight data;
                          ``(B) 15 United States seaports that support the 
                      highest volume of international sea travel, as 
                      determined by available Federal travel data; and
                          ``(C) 15 United States land ports of entry that 
                      support the highest volume of vehicle, pedestrian, and 
                      cargo crossings, as determined by available Federal 
                      border crossing data.
          ``(b) Implementation.--
                  ``(1) Pilot program at land ports of entry for non-
              pedestrian outbound traffic.--Not later than 18 months after 
              the date of the enactment of this section, the Secretary, in 
              collaboration with industry stakeholders, shall establish a 
              six-month pilot program to test the biometric exit data system 
              referred to in subsection (a)(2) on non-pedestrian outbound 
              traffic at not fewer than three land ports of entry with 
              significant cross-border traffic, including at not fewer than 
              two land ports of entry on the southern land border and at 
              least one land port of entry on the northern land border. Such 
              pilot program may include a consideration of more than one 
              biometric mode, and shall be implemented to determine the 
              following:
                          ``(A) How a nationwide implementation of such 
                      biometric exit data system at land ports of entry shall 
                      be carried out.
                          ``(B) The infrastructure required to carry out 
                      subparagraph (A).
                          ``(C) The effects of such pilot program on 
                      legitimate travel and trade.
                          ``(D) The effects of such pilot program on wait 
                      times, including processing times, for such non-
                      pedestrian traffic.
                          ``(E) Its effectiveness in combating terrorism.
                  ``(2) At land ports of entry for non-pedestrian outbound 
              traffic.--
                          ``(A) In general.--Not later than five years after 
                      the date of the enactment of this section, the 
                      Secretary shall expand the biometric exit data system 
                      referred to in subsection (a)(2) to all land ports of 
                      entry, and such system shall apply only in the case of 
                      non-pedestrian outbound traffic.
                          ``(B) Extension.--The Secretary may extend for a 
                      single two-year period the date specified in 
                      subparagraph (A) if the Secretary certifies to the 
                      Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs 
                      and the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate and 
                      the Committee on Homeland Security and the Committee on 
                      the Judiciary of the House of Representatives that the 
                      15 land ports of entry that support the highest volume 
                      of passenger vehicles, as determined by available 
                      Federal data, do not have the physical infrastructure 
                      or characteristics to install the systems necessary to 
                      implement a biometric exit data system.
                  ``(3) At air and sea ports of entry.--Not later than five 
              years after the date of the enactment of this section, the 
              Secretary shall expand the biometric exit data system referred 
              to in subsection (a)(2) to all air and sea ports of entry.
                  ``(4) At land ports of entry for pedestrians.--Not later 
              than five years after the date of the enactment of this 
              section, the Secretary shall expand the biometric exit data 
              system referred to in subsection (a)(2) to all land ports of 
              entry, and such system shall apply only in the case of 
              pedestrians.
          ``(c) Effects on Air, Sea, and Land Transportation.--The Secretary, 
      in consultation with appropriate private sector stakeholders, shall 
      ensure that the collection of biometric data under this section causes 
      the least possible disruption to the movement of people or cargo in 
      air, sea, or land transportation, while fulfilling the goals of 
      improving counterterrorism efforts.
          ``(d) Termination of Proceeding.--Notwithstanding any other 
      provision of law, the Secretary shall, on the date of the enactment of 
      this section, terminate the proceeding entitled `Collection of Alien 
      Biometric Data Upon Exit From the United States at Air and Sea Ports of 
      Departure; United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator 
      Technology Program (``US-VISIT'')', issued on April 24, 2008 (73 Fed. 
      Reg. 22065).
          ``(e) Data-Matching.--The biometric exit data system established 
      under this section shall--
                  ``(1) match biometric information for an alien who is 
              departing the United States against the biometric information 
              obtained from the alien upon entry to the United States;
                  ``(2) leverage the infrastructure and databases of the 
              current biometric entry and exit system established pursuant to 
              section 7208 of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism 
              Prevention Act of 2004 (8 U.S.C. 1365b) for the purpose 
              described in paragraph (1); and
                  ``(3) be interoperable with, and allow matching against, 
              other Federal databases that store biometrics of known or 
              suspected terrorists.
          ``(f) Scope.--
                  ``(1) In general.--The biometric exit data system 
              established under this section shall include a requirement for 
              the collection of biometric exit data at the time of departure 
              for all categories of individuals who are required by the 
              Secretary to provide biometric entry data.
                  ``(2) Exception for certain other individuals.--This 
              section shall not apply in the case of an individual who exits 
              and then enters the United States on a passenger vessel (as 
              such term is defined in section 2101 of title 46, United States 
              Code) the itinerary of which originates and terminates in the 
              United States.
                  ``(3) Exception for land ports of entry.--This section 
              shall not apply in the case of a United States or Canadian 
              citizen who exits the United States through a land port of 
              entry.
          ``(g) Collection of Data.--The Secretary may not require any non-
      Federal person to collect biometric data pursuant to the biometric exit 
      data system established under this section, except through a 
      contractual agreement.
          ``(h) Multi-Modal Collection.--In carrying out subsections (a)(1) 
      and (b), the Secretary shall make every effort to collect biometric 
      data using multiple modes of biometrics.
          ``(i) Facilities.--All nonfederally owned facilities at which the 
      biometric exit data system established under this section is 
      implemented shall provide, maintain, and equip space for Federal use 
      that is adequate to support biometric data collection and other 
      inspection-related activity. Such space shall be provided, maintained, 
      and equipped at no cost to the Government.
          ``(j) Northern Land Border.--In the case of the northern land 
      border, the requirements under subsections (a)(2)(C), (b)(2)(A), and 
      (b)(4) may be achieved through the sharing of biometric data provided 
      to U.S. Customs and Border Protection by the Canadian Border Services 
      Agency pursuant to the 2011 Beyond the Border agreement.
          ``(k) Congressional Review.--Not later than 90 days after the date 
      of the enactment of this section, the Secretary shall submit to the 
      Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of the Senate, 
      the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate, the Committee on Homeland 
      Security of the House of Representatives, and the Committee on the 
      Judiciary of the House of Representatives reports and recommendations 
      regarding the Science and Technology Directorate's Air Entry and Exit 
      Re-Engineering Program of the Department and the U.S. Customs and 
      Border Protection entry and exit mobility program demonstrations.''.
      
      SEC. 206. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON COOPERATION BETWEEN AGENCIES.
      
          (a) Finding.--Congress finds that personnel constraints exist at 
      land ports of entry with regard to sanitary and phytosanitary 
      inspections for exported goods.
          (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that, in the 
      best interest of cross-border trade and the agricultural community--
                  (1) any lack of certified personnel for inspection purposes 
              at ports of entry should be addressed by seeking cooperation 
              between agencies and departments of the United States, whether 
              in the form of a memorandum of understanding or through a 
              certification process, whereby additional existing agents are 
              authorized for additional hours to facilitate the crossing and 
              trade of perishable goods in a manner consistent with rules of 
              the Department of Agriculture; and
                  (2) cross designation should be available for personnel who 
              will assist more than one agency or department at land ports of 
              entry to facilitate increased trade and commerce.
      
      SEC. 207. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.
      
          In addition to any amounts otherwise authorized to be appropriated 
      for such purpose, there is authorized to be appropriated $1,000,000,000 
      for each of fiscal years 2018 through 2021 to carry out this title, of 
      which $2,000,000 shall be used by the Secretary for hiring additional 
      Uniform Management Center support personnel, purchasing uniforms for 
      CBP officers and agents, acquiring additional motor vehicles to support 
      vehicle mounted surveillance systems, hiring additional motor vehicle 
      program support personnel, and for contract support for customer 
      service, vendor management, and operations management.
      Plain English Summary: - Provides access to technologies necessary for border security including but not limited to: cameras, drones, towers, fences, sensors, vehicles, radar.
      - Provides funding to border patrol.
      - Must respect treaty agreements with Native American Tribes.
      - From FY 2018 to FY 2021, Congress is authorized to appropriate $1,000,000,000 to carry out the provisions under the Act.
      Appropriation
      - In addition to any amounts otherwise authorized to be appropriated
      for such purpose, there is authorized to be appropriated $1,000,000,000
      for each of fiscal years 2018 through 2021 to carry out this title, of
      which $2,000,000 shall be used by the Secretary for hiring additional
      Uniform Management Center support personnel, purchasing uniforms for
      CBP officers and agents, acquiring additional motor vehicles to support
      vehicle mounted surveillance systems, hiring additional motor vehicle
      program support personnel, and for contract support for customer
      service, vendor management, and operations management.
      • 2 comments
      • 73 views
    8. The Every American Counts Act

      Senator: Mr. Jon-Anders Jackson of Maryland Terms & Definitions:

      Within the context of this act, the terms “territory” and “territories” shall refer only to the four unincorporated, organized U.S. possessions of Guam, Puerto Rico, Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands as well as the only inhabited unicorporated, unorganized territory: American Samoa.

      The Palmyra Atoll, the only incorporated, unorganized territory, shall be known by its name.

      Other U.S. possessions shall be known by their colloquial name “Guano Islands.” 

      Findings:

      1. American territorial law has not been meaningfully updated since 1907.

      2. In addition to having no representation in the Senate and only non-voting delegates in the House of Representatives, those living in the territories have no ability to meanungfully vote in the presidential election, making them the only American citizens without this right.

      3. American Samoa, home to nearly fifty-six thousand persons, is categorized alongside the unihabited Guano Islands. This means that American Samoa residents are not even considered citizens, they are merely U.S. nationals. This makes American Samoa the only inhabited U.S. possession in this situation.

      4. The citizens of Puerto Rico, in both 2012 and 2017, the two most recent referendums, voted for the island to pursue a path towards statehood.

      Law Change:

      Section 1. Palmyra Atoll Reclassification & Guano Islands

      1. The Palmyra Atoll, despite being unpopulated, is an incorporated territory. Upon this act’s effective date, it shall be reclassified as a unincorporated, unorganized territory putting it in line with other unpopulated island possessions of the United States.
      2. This act shall have no effect on the classification of the Guano Islands; they shall remain categorized as unincorporated, unorganized territories.

      Section 2. Reclassification of American Samoa

      1. American Samoa, upon this act’s effective date shall be reclassified as an unincorporated, organized territory, bringing it into alignment with the other populated U.S. territories.
      2. From the effective date of this act, all current American Samoa residents who are considered U.S. nationals shall become natural-born citizens.
      3. From the effective date of this act, all future persons born within America Samoa shall be natural born citizens.

      Section 3. Committees for Future Progress

      1. Given Puerto Rico’s sizeable population and most recent referendum calling for the territory to pursue statehood, upon the effective date of this act, the Secretary of the Interior, in conjunction with Congress, shall establish a politically-balanced panel consisting of leaders from Puerto Rico, Congress, the Department of Treasury, and the Department of the Interior to evaluate the readiness of Puerto Rico to be reclassified as an incorporated, organized territory and begin the process towards statehood.
      2. Upon the effective date of this act, the Federal Elections Commission, in partnership with an equally-balanced bipartisan attaché from both houses of Congress as well as leaders from all five territories, shall convene a committee to draft proposals for incorporating the territories into the electoral college. These proposals shall be presented to both chambers of Congress. The best of which will be used as a foundation to a proposed Constitutional amendment, which must then follow the usual steps to be ratified.

       

      Plain English Summary: Our classification of territories is outdated and unjust. In order to be the true land of liberty, we must take steps to modernize the rights and classifications of our territories.
      • 2 comments
      • 80 views
    9. Religious Freedom Protection for Health Care Worker Act

      Senator: Mr. Senator Jim Koch Terms & Definitions:

      Health care worker 

      Law Change:

      Religious Freedom Protection for Health Care Worker Act

      (a) This act will ensure that health care workers’ religious rights guaranteed in the United States constitution will be codified and protected.

      (b) A health care worker who objects to performing procedures like and is not limited to: abortions, gender reassignment surgery, euthanasia, will not be coerced into providing these procedures if these directly contradicts their religious beliefs or conscience rights.

      (c) This act will prohibit the federal government from creating any legislation that would to compel or coerce health care workers to provide care that goes against their religious beliefs.

      • 4 comments
      • 79 views
    10. Taylor Force Act

      Senator: Senator Aldrich RL Author: Senator Lindsey Graham Terms & Definitions:
      A BILL

      To condition assistance to the West Bank and Gaza on steps by the Palestinian Authority to end violence and terrorism against Israeli citizens and United States Citizens.

      Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

      SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

      This Act may be cited as the “Taylor Force Act”.

      Findings:

       

      SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

      Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) The Palestinian Authority’s practice of paying salaries to terrorists serving in Israeli prisons, as well as to the families of deceased terrorists, is an incentive to commit acts of terror.

      (2) The United States does not provide direct budgetary support to the Palestinian Authority. The United States does pay certain debts held by the Palestinian Authority and fund programs which the Palestinian Authority would otherwise be responsible for.

      (3) The United States Government supports community-based programs in the West Bank and Gaza that provide for basic human needs, such as food, water, health, shelter, protection, education and livelihoods, and that promote peace and development.

      (4) Since fiscal year 2015, annual appropriations legislation has provided for the reduction of Economic Support Fund aid for the Palestinian Authority “by an amount the Secretary determines is equivalent to the amount expended by the Palestinian Authority as payments for acts of terrorism by individuals who are imprisoned after being fairly tried and convicted for acts of terrorism and by individuals who died committing acts of terrorism during the previous calendar year”.

       

       

      SEC. 3. SENSE OF CONGRESS.

      Congress—

      (1) calls on the Palestinian Authority to stop these payments and repeal the laws authorizing them;

      (2) calls on all donor countries providing budgetary assistance to the Palestinian Authority to cease direct budgetary support until the Palestinian Authority stops all payments incentivizing terror;

      (3) supports the creation of a general welfare system, available to all Palestinian citizens within the jurisdictional control of the Palestinian Authority;

      (4) urges the United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations to use that position to highlight the issue of Palestinian Authority payments for acts of terrorism and to urge other member nations of the Security Council and the General Assembly to join the United States in calling on the Palestinian Authority to end this system immediately; and

      (5) urges the Department of State to use its bilateral and multilateral engagements with all governments and organizations committed to the cause of peace to highlight the issue of Palestinian Authority payments for acts of terrorism and join the United States in calling on the Palestinian Authority to end this system immediately.

      Law Change:

      SEC. 4. LIMITATION ON ASSISTANCE TO THE WEST BANK AND GAZA.

       

      (a) In General.—Funds appropriated or otherwise made available for assistance under chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2346 et seq.; relating to Economic Support Fund) and available for assistance for the West Bank and Gaza that directly benefit the Palestinian Authority may only be made available for such purpose if the Secretary of State certifies in writing to the appropriate congressional committees that the Palestinian Authority—

      (1) is taking credible steps to end acts of violence against Israeli citizens and United States citizens that are perpetrated by individuals under its jurisdictional control, such as the March 2016 attack that killed former United States Army officer Taylor Force, a veteran of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan;

      (2) has terminated payments for acts of terrorism against Israeli citizens and United States citizens to any individual, after being fairly tried, who has been imprisoned for such acts of terrorism and to any individual who died committing such acts of terrorism, including to a family member of such individuals; and;

      (3) has revoked any law, decree, regulation, or document authorizing or implementing a system of compensation for imprisoned individuals that uses the sentence or period of incarceration of an individual to determine the level of compensation paid.; and

      (4) is publicly condemning such acts of violence and is taking steps to investigate or is cooperating in investigations of such acts to bring the perpetrators to justice.

      (b) Exception.—The limitation on assistance under subsection (a) shall not apply to payments made to the East Jerusalem Hospital Network.

      (c) Rule Of Construction.—Amounts withheld pursuant to this section shall be deemed to satisfy any similar withholding or reduction required under any other provision of law.

      SEC. 5. CONTINUOUS CERTIFICATION.

      Funds appropriated or otherwise made available for assistance under chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2346 et seq.; relating to Economic Support Fund) and available for assistance for the West Bank and Gaza may only be made available for such purpose if, not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, and every 180 days thereafter, the Secretary of State certifies in writing to the appropriate congressional committees that the Palestinian Authority is taking credible and verifiable steps to end acts of violence against Israeli citizens and United States citizens that are perpetrated by individuals under its jurisdictional control.

      SEC. 6. PALESTINIAN AUTHORITY ACCOUNTABILITY FUND.

       

      (a) Establishment Of Fund.—There is established in the Treasury a fund to be known as the “Palestinian Authority Accountability Fund” (PAAF). The PAAF shall consist of funds withheld under sections 4 and 5.

      (b) Investments.—The Secretary of State shall invest funds in the PAAF in an interest-bearing obligation of the United States Government, or an obligation that has its principal and interest guaranteed by the Government, that the Secretary determines has a maturity suitable for the Fund.

      (c) Use Of Funds.—Funds from the PAAF may be made available upon a certification by the Secretary of State that the Palestinian Authority has met the conditions set forth in section 4(a).

      (d) Disposition Of Unused Funds.—On the date that is one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, all funds that are in the PAAF shall be withdrawn and made available to the Department of State for the purpose of assistance other than that deemed benefitting the Palestinian Authority.

      SEC. 67. ANNUAL REPORT.

       

      (a) In General.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the Secretary of State shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report including at a minimum the following elements:

      (1) An estimate of the amount expended by the Palestinian Authority during the previous calendar year as payments for acts of terrorism by individuals who are imprisoned for such acts.

      (2) An estimate of the amount expended by the Palestinian Authority during the previous calendar year as payments to the families of deceased individuals who committed an act of terrorism.

      (3) An overview of Palestinian laws, decrees, regulations, or documents in effect the previous calendar year that authorize or implement any payments reported under paragraphs (1) and (2).

      (4) A description of United States Government policy, efforts, and engagement with the Palestinian Authority in order to confirm the revocation of any law, decree, regulation, or document in effect the previous calendar year that authorizes or implements any payments reported under paragraphs (1) and (2).

      (5) A description of United States Government policy, efforts, and engagement with other governments, and at the United Nations, to highlight the issue of Palestinian payments for acts of terrorism and to urge other nations to join the United States in calling on the Palestinian Authority to end this system immediately.

      Plain English Summary: Taylor Force Act

      (Sec. 3) This bill: (1) calls on the Palestinian Authority's (PA) to stop making payments to terrorists in Israeli prisons and to the families of deceased terrorists, (2) calls on countries to cease providing direct budgetary assistance to the PA until it stops all payments incentivizing terror, (3) urges the U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations (U.N.) and the Department of State to highlight the issue and urge other nations to call for an end to such payments, and (4) expresses support for creation of a general welfare system for all Palestinian citizens.

      (Sec. 4) Certain assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 that directly benefits the PA may not be made available for the West Bank and Gaza unless the State Department certifies that the PA:

      is taking steps to end acts of violence against U.S. and Israeli citizens perpetrated by individuals under its jurisdictional control, such as the March 2016 attack that killed former Army officer Taylor Force;
      has terminated payments for acts of terrorism against U.S. and Israeli citizens to any individual who has been fairly tried and imprisoned for such acts, to any individual who died committing such acts, and to family members of such an individual;
      has revoked any law, decree, or document authorizing or implementing a system of compensation for imprisoned individuals that uses the sentence or incarceration period to determine compensation; and
      is publicly condemning such acts and is taking steps to investigate or is cooperating in investigations to bring the perpetrators to justice.
      This assistance limitation shall not apply to payments made to the East Jerusalem Hospital Network.

      (Sec. 5) Certain assistance under such Act for the West Bank and Gaza may not be made available unless the State Department certifies every 180 days that the PA is taking verifiable steps to end acts of violence against Israeli and U.S. citizens by individuals under its jurisdictional control.

      (Sec. 6) The bill establishes the Palestinian Authority Accountability Fund, which shall consist of amounts withheld under this bill. Such amounts may be made available upon a State Department certification that the PA has met the conditions for which they were withheld.

      (Sec. 7) The State Department shall report to Congress annually with respect to: (1) PA expenditures as payments to individuals and families for acts of terrorism; (2) Palestinian laws, decrees, regulations, or documents that authorize or implement such payments and U.S. policy and engagement with the PA to confirm their revocation; and (3) U.S. policy and engagement with other governments and the U.N. to highlight such payments and urge other nations to join the United States in calling on the PA to end them.

      • 18 comments
      • 50 views
    11. Lawful Interstate Transportation of Firearms Act

      Senator: Mr. Parker RL Author: Hatch Law Change:

      2.

      Interstate transportation of firearms or ammunition

      (a)

      In general

      Section 926A of title 18, United States Code, is amended to read as follows:

      926A.

      Interstate transportation of firearms or ammunition

      (a)

      Notwithstanding any provision of any law, rule, or regulation of a State or any political subdivision thereof:

      (1)

      A person who is not prohibited by this chapter from possessing, transporting, shipping, or receiving a firearm or ammunition shall be entitled to transport a firearm for any lawful purpose from any place where the person may lawfully possess, carry, or transport the firearm to any other such place if, during the transportation, the firearm is unloaded, and—

      (A)

      if the transportation is by motor vehicle, the firearm is not directly accessible from the passenger compartment of the vehicle, and, if the vehicle is without a compartment separate from the passenger compartment, the firearm is in a locked container other than the glove compartment or console, or is secured by a secure gun storage or safety device; or

      (B)

      if the transportation is by other means, the firearm is in a locked container or secured by a secure gun storage or safety device.

      (2)

      A person who is not prohibited by this chapter from possessing, transporting, shipping, or receiving a firearm or ammunition shall be entitled to transport ammunition, or any detachable magazine or feeding device for ammunition, for any lawful purpose from any place where the person may lawfully possess, carry, or transport the ammunition, magazine, or feeding device to any other such place if, during the transportation, the ammunition, magazine, or feeding device is not loaded into a firearm, and—

      (A)

      if the transportation is by motor vehicle, the ammunition, magazine, or feeding device is not directly accessible from the passenger compartment of the vehicle, and, if the vehicle is without a compartment separate from the passenger compartment, the ammunition, magazine, or feeding device is in a locked container other than the glove compartment or console; or

      (B)

      if the transportation is by other means, the ammunition, magazine, or feeding device is in a locked container.

      (b)

      In subsection (a), the term transport—

      (1)

      includes staying in temporary lodging overnight, stopping for food, fuel, vehicle maintenance, an emergency, medical treatment, or any other activity incidental to the transport; and

      (2)

      does not include transportation—

      (A)

      with the intent to commit a crime; or

      (B)

      with knowledge, or reasonable cause to believe, that such a crime is to be committed in the course of, or arising from, the transportation.

      (c)(1)

      A person who is transporting a firearm, ammunition, magazine, or feeding device may not be arrested or otherwise detained for violation of any law or any rule or regulation of a State or any political subdivision thereof related solely to the possession, transportation, or carrying of firearms, ammunition, magazine, or feeding device unless there is probable cause to believe that the person is doing so in a manner not provided for in subsection (a).

      (2)

      When a person asserts this section as a defense in a criminal proceeding, the prosecution shall bear the burden of proving, beyond a reasonable doubt, that the conduct of the person did not satisfy the conditions set forth in subsection (a).

      (3)

      When a person successfully asserts this section as a defense in a criminal proceeding, the court shall award the prevailing defendant a reasonable attorney’s fee.

      (d)(1)

      A person who is deprived of any right, privilege, or immunity secured by this section, section 926B or 926C, under color of any statute, ordinance, regulation, custom, or usage of any State or any political subdivision thereof, may bring an action in any appropriate court against any other person, including a State or political subdivision thereof, who causes the person to be subject to the deprivation, for damages and other appropriate relief.

      (2)

      The court shall award a plaintiff prevailing in an action brought under paragraph (1) damages and such other relief as the court deems appropriate, including a reasonable attorney's fee.

      .

      (b)

      Clerical amendment

      The table of sections for chapter 44 of title 18, United States Code, is amended by striking the item relating to section 926A and inserting the following:

      926A. Interstate transportation of firearms or ammunition.

      .

      Plain English Summary: Fixes an oversight on the Firearms Owners Protection Act of 1986 by decriminalizing transport of certain firearms and accessories through localities where such items are generally illegal to possess.
      • 10 comments
      • 51 views
    12. Federal Reserve Transparency Act

      Senator: Mr. Parker RL Author: Paul Law Change:

      SEC. 2. AUDIT REFORM AND TRANSPARENCY FOR THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE
                    FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM.

          (a) In General.--Notwithstanding section 714 of title 31, United
      States Code, or any other provision of law, an audit of the Board of
      Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the Federal reserve banks
      under subsection (b) of such section 714 shall be completed within 12
      months of the date of enactment of this Act.
          (b) Report.--
                  (1) In general.--A report on the audit required under
              subsection (a) shall be submitted by the Comptroller General to
              the Congress before the end of the 90-day period beginning on
              the date on which such audit is completed and made available to
              the Speaker of the House, the majority and minority leaders of
              the House of Representatives, the majority and minority leaders
              of the Senate, the Chairman and Ranking Member of the committee
              and each subcommittee of jurisdiction in the House of
              Representatives and the Senate, and any other Member of
              Congress who requests it.
                  (2) Contents.--The report under paragraph (1) shall include
              a detailed description of the findings and conclusion of the
              Comptroller General with respect to the audit that is the
              subject of the report, together with such recommendations for
              legislative or administrative action as the Comptroller General
              may determine to be appropriate.
          (c) Repeal of Certain Limitations.--Subsection (b) of section 714
      of title 31, United States Code, is amended by striking all after ``in
      writing.''.
          (d) Technical and Conforming Amendment.--Section 714 of title 31,
      United States Code, is amended by striking subsection (f).

      SEC. 3. AUDIT OF LOAN FILE REVIEWS REQUIRED BY ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS.

          (a) In General.--The Comptroller General of the United States shall
      conduct an audit of the review of loan files of homeowners in
      foreclosure in 2009 or 2010, required as part of the enforcement
      actions taken by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
      against supervised financial institutions.
          (b) Content of Audit.--The audit carried out pursuant to subsection
      (a) shall consider, at a minimum--
                  (1) the guidance given by the Board of Governors of the
              Federal Reserve System to independent consultants retained by
              the supervised financial institutions regarding the procedures
              to be followed in conducting the file reviews;
                  (2) the factors considered by independent consultants when
              evaluating loan files;
                  (3) the results obtained by the independent consultants
              pursuant to those reviews;
                  (4) the determinations made by the independent consultants
              regarding the nature and extent of financial injury sustained
              by each homeowner as well as the level and type of remediation
              offered to each homeowner; and
                  (5) the specific measures taken by the independent
              consultants to verify, confirm, or rebut the assertions and
              representations made by supervised financial institutions
              regarding the contents of loan files and the extent of
              financial injury to homeowners.
          (c) Report.--Not later than the end of the 6-month period beginning
      on the date of the enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General shall
      issue a report to the Congress containing all findings and
      determinations made in carrying out the audit required under subsection
      (a).
       

      Plain English Summary: Authorizes the first comprehensive audit of the Federal Reserve since its inception in 1913.
      • 18 comments
      • 52 views
    13. Community Health Center and Primary Care Workforce Expansion Act of 2019

      Senator: Mr. Walker-Nguyen RL Author: Bernie Sanders Findings:
      Section I. Short title

      This Act may be cited as the Community Health Center and Primary Care Workforce Expansion Act of 2017.

      Section IICommunity health center program (a)In general

      Section 10503(b)(1) of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (42 U.S.C. 254b–2(b)(1)42 U.S.C. 254b–2(b)(1)42 U.S.C. 254b–2(b)(1)42 U.S.C. 254b–2(b)(1)42 U.S.C. 254b–2(b)(1)) is amended—

      (1) in subparagraph (D), by striking and at the end; (2) in subparagraph (E), by striking ; and; and (3) by adding at the end the following:
      (F) $5,110,000,000 for fiscal year 2018;
      (G) $5,410,000,000 for fiscal year 2019;
      (H) $5,790,000,000 for fiscal year 2020;
      (I) $6,620,000,000 for fiscal year 2021;
      (J) $7,510,000,000 for fiscal year 2022;
      (K) $8,460,000,000 for fiscal year 2023;
      (L) $9,490,000,000 for fiscal year 2024;
      (M) $10,590,000,000 for fiscal year 2025;
      (N) $11,780,000,000 for fiscal year 2026;
      (O) $12,500,000,000 for fiscal year 2027; and
      (P) for fiscal year 2028, and each subsequent fiscal year, the amount appropriated for the preceding fiscal year adjusted by the product of—

      (i) one plus the average percentage increase in costs incurred per patient served; and

      (ii) one plus the average percentage increase in the total number of patients served; and

      (b) Capital projects

      In addition to amounts otherwise appropriated under section 10503(b) of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (42 U.S.C. 254b–2(b)42 U.S.C. 254b–2(b)42 U.S.C. 254b–2(b)42 U.S.C. 254b–2(b)42 U.S.C. 254b–2(b)), there is authorized to be appropriated, and there is appropriated, for the community health centers program under section 330 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 254b) for capital projects, $18,600,000,000 for fiscal year 2017.

      (c)Limitation

      Amounts otherwise appropriated for community health centers may not be reduced as a result of the appropriations made under this section.

      (d) Availability of funds

      Amounts appropriated under this section shall remain available until expended.

      Section III.  National Health Service Corps (a) In general

      Section 10503(b)(2) of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (42 U.S.C. 254b–2(b)(2)42 U.S.C. 254b–2(b)(2)42 U.S.C. 254b–2(b)(2)42 U.S.C. 254b–2(b)(2)42 U.S.C. 254b–2(b)(2)) is amended—

      (1) in subparagraph (D), by striking and at the end; (2) in subparagraph (E), by striking the period; and (3) by adding at the end the following:
      (F) $850,000,000 for fiscal year 2018;
      (G) $893,000,000 for fiscal year 2019;
      (H) $938,000,000 for fiscal year 2020;
      (I) $985,000,000 for fiscal year 2021;
      (J) $1,030,000,000 for fiscal year 2022;
      (K) $1,090,000,000 for fiscal year 2023;
      (L) $1,100,000,000 for fiscal year 2024;
      (M) $1,200,000,000 for fiscal year 2025;
      (N) $1,300,000,000 for fiscal year 2026;
      (O) $1,500,000,000 for fiscal year 2027; and
      (P) for fiscal year 2028, and each subsequent fiscal year, the amount appropriated for the preceding fiscal year adjusted by the product of—

      (i) one plus the average percentage increase in the costs of health professions education during the prior fiscal year; and

      (ii) one plus the average percentage change in the number of individuals residing in health professions shortage areas designated under section 333 of the Public Health Service Act during the prior fiscal year, relative to the number of individuals residing in such areas during the previous fiscal year.

      (b) Limitation

      Amounts otherwise appropriated for National Health Service Corps may not be reduced as a result of the appropriations made under this section.

      (c) Availability of funds

      Amounts appropriated under this section shall remain available until expended.

      Section IVTeaching Health Centers (a) In general

      Section 340H(g) of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 256h(g)) is amended—

      (1) by striking 2015 and and inserting 2015,; and (2) by striking the period and inserting , $176,000,000 for fiscal years 2018 and 2019, $184,000,000 for fiscal year 2020, $194,000,000 for fiscal year 2021, $203,000,000 for fiscal year 2022, $214,000,000 for fiscal year 2023, $224,000,000 for fiscal year 2024, $235,000,000 for fiscal year 2025, $247,000,000 for fiscal year 2026, $260,000,000 for fiscal year 2027, and for fiscal year 2028, and each subsequent fiscal year, the amount appropriated for the preceding fiscal year adjusted by the greater of the annual percentage increase in the medical care component of the consumer price index for all urban consumers (U.S. city average) as rounded up in an appropriate manner, or the percentage increase for the fiscal year involved under section 2(a)(11).. (b) Limitation

      Amounts otherwise appropriated for Teaching Health Centers may not be reduced as a result of the appropriations made under this section.

      (c) Availability of funds

      Amounts appropriated under this section shall remain available until expended.

      Section VNurse Practitioner Residency Training Programs (a) In general

      Section 5316 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is amended by striking subsection (i) and inserting the following:

      (i) Appropriations

      In addition to amounts otherwise appropriated, there is authorized to be appropriated, and there is appropriated to carry out this section—

      (1) $35,000,000 for fiscal year 2018; (2) $40,000,000 for fiscal year 2019; (3) $45,000,000 for fiscal year 2020; (4) $50,000,000 for fiscal year 2021; (5) $55,000,000 for fiscal year 2022; (6) $60,000,000 for fiscal year 2023; (7) $65,000,000 for fiscal year 2024; (8) $70,000,000 for fiscal year 2025; (9) $75,000,000 for fiscal year 2026; (10) $80,000,000 for fiscal year 2027; and (11) for fiscal year 2028, and each subsequent fiscal year, the amount appropriated for the preceding fiscal year adjusted by the greater of the annual percentage increase in the medical care component of the consumer price index for all urban consumers (U.S. city average) as rounded up in an appropriate manner, or the percentage increase for the fiscal year involved under section 10503(b)(1)(P) of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.
      (b)Limitation

      Amounts otherwise appropriated for Nurse Practitioner Residency Training Programs may not be reduced as a result of the appropriations made under this section.

      (c) Availability of funds

      Amounts appropriated under this section shall remain available until expended.

      Law Change:
      1. To provide funding for Federally Qualified Health Centers, the National Health Service Corps, Teaching Health Centers, and the Nurse Practitioner Residency Training program.
      • 22 comments
      • 142 views
    14. Freedom of Conscience Act

      Senator: Mr. Sheridan RL Author: Sections of this legislation which shall have been paraphrased for adaptation to federal jurisdiction have been based on legislation presented as SB.709 of the 96th Missouri General Assembly and also upon New York Civil Code (N.Y. CVR. LAW § 79-I). Law Change:

      A. Discrimination against a person who refuses to perform certain act is prohibited.

      i. When the performing of an abortion on a human being or assisting thereat is contrary to the conscience or religious beliefs of any person, he or she may refuse to perform or assist in such abortion by filing a prior written refusal setting forth the reasons therefore with the appropriate and responsible hospital, person, firm, corporation or association, 

      ii. Or refuse to refer a person for such abortion, or refuse to provide information about such an abortion, and no such public or private human services agency, hospital, person, firm, corporation or association shall discriminate against the person so refusing to act. 

      iii. When providing a person with any form of assistance or information relating to medical treatment is contrary to the conscience or religious beliefs of any person, he or she may refuse to provide such assistance or information, or refuse to refer a person for such assistance or information, 

      iv. No public or private human services agency, hospital, person, firm, corporation or association shall discriminate against the person refusing to act. 

       

      v. When providing a person with any form of assistance to end their life is contrary to the conscience or religious beliefs of any person, he or she may refuse to provide such assistance, or refuse to refer a person for such assistance, or refuse to provide information about such assistance, and no public or private human services or health care agency, hospital, person, firm, corporation or association shall discriminate against the person refusing to act,

      vi. When providing a person with any form of assistance or information about contraception or contraceptive devices is contrary to the conscience or religious beliefs of any person, he or she may refuse to provide such assistance, or refuse to refer a person for such assistance, or refuse to provide information about such assistance, and no public or private human services or health care agency, hospital, person, firm, corporation or association shall discriminate against the person refusing to act,

      vii. Every public and private agency, hospital, person, firm, corporation or association that provides human services or health care services shall be required to notify employees of their rights under this legislation in writing and to include these rights in their employee handbooks and personnel procedures.

      B. A violation of the provisions of this section shall constitute a misdemeanor. 

      i. An individual affected by any action in violation of this legislation may also bring a private cause of action against any institution or individual who violates this legislation. 

      ii. No civil action for negligence or malpractice, or disciplinary action for professional misconduct, shall be maintained against a person so refusing to act based on such refusal.

      iii. Professional license, including renewal or recertification thereof, shall not be denied to any person based on such refusal, nor shall such license be suspended or revoked based on such refusal.

      C. No portions of the Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act shall interfere with rights created in this act.

      • 7 comments
      • 52 views
    15. Physical Pain Prevention In The Unborn Act

      Senator: Senator Anthony D. Granata RL Author: Senator Lindsey Graham Findings:

      1. Science finds that a fetus develops touch sensitive feeling at 8 weeks. 

      2. Science finds that a fetus recognized pain through stimuli located throughout the body by 20 weeks. 

      3. Science finds that pain recognized by a fetus at 20 weeks would also be recognizable to an adult human. 

      Law Change:

      This bill amends Capter 74 of title 18 of the United States Code, inserting after section 1531 the following: 

      Section 1532 - UNBORN CHILD PROTECTION.

      A. Unlawful Conduct. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, it shall be unlawful for any person to perform an abortion or attempt to do so, unless in conformity with the requirements set forth in subsection B. 

      B. Requirements for Abortions.

           (I) Assessment of the age of the unborn child. The physician performing or attempting the abortion shall first make a determination of the probable post-fertilization age of the unborn child or reasonably rely upon such a determination made by another physician. In making such a determination, the physician shall make such inquiries of the pregnant woman and perform or cause to be performed such medical examinations and tests as a reasonably prudent physician, knowledgeable about the case and the medical conditions involved, would consider necessary to make an accurate determination of post- fertilization age.

           (II) Prohibition on performance of certain abortions. 

                (a) Generally for unborn children 20 weeks or older. Except as provided in subparagraph (b) the abortion shall not be performed or attempted, if the probable post-fertilization age, as determined under paragraph (I) of the unborn child is 20 weeks or greater.

       (III) Exceptions. Subparagraph (a) does not apply if 

                (i) in reasonable medical judgment, the abortion is necessary to save the life of a pregnant woman whose life is endangered by a physical disorder, physical illness, or physical injury, including a life-endangering physical condition caused by or arising from the pregnancy itself, but not including psychological or emotional conditions; 

                (ii) the pregnancy is the result of rape against an adult woman, and at least 48 hours prior to the abortion 

                       (I) she has obtained counseling for the rape; or 

                      (II) she has obtained medical treatment for the rape or an injury related to the rape; or 

                     (III) the pregnancy is a result of rape against a minor or incest against a minor, and the rape or incest has been reported at any time prior to the abortion to either 

                               (I) a government agency legally authorized to act on reports of child abuse; or 

                               (II) a law enforcement agency

       

      Plain English Summary: places higher restrictions on abortion starting at 20 weeks.
      • 17 comments
      • 46 views
    16. Re-NAFTA Bill

      Senator: Mr. Shultz Law Change:

      SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

      This Act may be cited as the "Adequate Deployed Defense Act."

      SECTION 2. DEFINITION OF DEFENSIVE EQUIPMENT, DEPLOYED, AND ADEQUATELY.

      a) Defensive equipment shall be defined as non-lethal by nature.

                 1. This includes but is not limited to: kevlar body armor, armored vehicles, night vision goggles, chemical filtration devices, etc.

      b) Deployed shall be defined as any service member currently deployed or to be deployed within 48 hours to a combat theatre.

      c) Adequately shall be defined as the minimum amount of equipment required for a serviceman to survive 90 days without guaranteed resupply.

      SECTION 3. IMPLEMENTATION

      a) An operation having been planned, requisite equipment must be obtained and distributed no later than 48 hours prior to operation's commencement.

      b) If requisite equipment has not been obtained and distributed by that point, then the operation must either proceed with the maximum number of adequately equipped service members or the operation must be cancelled.

      Section 4: Law Change

      1. In 2005, some 50,000 service members started the Iraq War without body armor. It was eventually handled but it took 167 days to finalize.

       

      2. Despite this, deaths still happened largely due to a lack of standardization.


      Section 5: Effective Date

      The bill shall go into effect upon its constitutional passage.

      • 0 comments
      • 53 views
    17. Future Workers of America Act

      Senator: Rep. Calvin Ward Terms & Definitions:

      Perkins Act: the Carl D Perkins Act of 2006

      Vocational Education: Education focused on career preparedness. For the sake of this bill offerings would include education in: engine repair, auto mechanic, auto body, keyboarding, programming, cosmetology, EAST programs, graphic arts, aviation,  agriculture welding, and criminal justice

       

      Findings:

      At least 3,500 students have been placed on waiting lists for entrance into public vocational schools in Massachusetts in 2014

      A lack of qualified teachers, restricted school budgets, high operational costs and an increase in the number of academic core requirements students are required to complete for graduation have influenced career-tech education's enrollment decline

      Most public high school students participate in vocational education. In 1992, almost all public high school graduates (97 percent) completed at least one vocational education course, and 87 percent completed at least one occupationally specific course (table 1). On average, graduates completed the equivalent of almost four full-year courses in vocational education (3.8 credits), with two and a half of these courses in occupational program areas

      District: Current local school districts governed by the local community and overseen by the State Board of Education

      Co-op: Formed by under resourced communities where multiple districts share resources for compliance

      Law Change:

      Increase allocation to Perkins Act to from $1.3 Billion to $2 Billion to be distributed among the states to be used for career preparation programs.

      Would require school districts to allocate money to Vocational Education Programs. 

      These funds may be used for the starting of new programs or the improvement of existing programs. Priority will be placed on new programs in rural and inner city school districts

      Would require all public schools to either have or create Vocational Education programs with 7 years of passage of the Act. Out of compliance districts will face penalties such as loss of Vocational funding. 

      Would allow for districts to pool resources into a Co-Op where many districts share resources to secure compliance. 

      States would submit bids for allocation. Allocation would be decided by June of each year for all states desiring to participate. 

      • 1 comment
      • 62 views
    18. Civil Rights Equality

      Senator: Mr. David Hampton RL Author: Representative David N. Cicilline Terms & Definitions:

      "sex" to include a sex stereotype, sexual orientation or gender identity.

      "sexual orientation" as homosexuality, heterosexuality, or bisexuality; and 

       

      Findings:

      Homosexual couples may hold the same rights under the court of law, but like African Americans, homosexual couples are hated. While 32% of the country still opposes equality in marriage. We see demonstrations where protesters are holding hateful signs with derogatory terminology on it. Homosexual couples are scared to act like a couple in public out of fear of public backlash. 

      Law Change:

      This law would change the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to include equal protection under the law for homosexual couples. No elected official, who are able to preform marriage ceremonies shall deny equal access under the law and this would force the DOJ to intervene. Ministers of religions will be exempt. Businesses shall not deny services to homosexual couples. Homosexual couples shall have equal opportunities. 

      • 3 comments
      • 58 views
    19. H.R.22 Secure Border Infrastructure Act

      Senator: Mr. Shultz RL Author: Mr. McCaul Law Change:


      This bill may be cited as the The Secure Border Infrastructure Act.

      SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.
          (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this Act is as 
      follows:
      
      Sec. 1. Short title.
                              TITLE I--BORDER SECURITY
      
      Sec. 101. Definitions.
                      Subtitle A--Infrastructure and Equipment
      
      Sec. 102. Strengthening the requirements for barriers along the 
                                  southern border.
      Sec. 103. Air and Marine Operations flight hours.
      Sec. 104. Capability deployment to specific sectors and regions.
      Sec. 105. U.S. Border Patrol physical infrastructure improvements.
      Sec. 106. U.S. Border Patrol activities.
      Sec. 107. U.S. Border Patrol forward operating bases.
      Sec. 108. Border security technology program management.
      Sec. 109. National Guard support to secure the southern border and 
                                  reimbursement of States for deployment of 
                                  the National Guard at the southern border.
      Sec. 110. Operation Phalanx.
      Sec. 111. Merida Initiative.
      Sec. 112. Prohibitions on actions that impede border security on 
                                  certain Federal land.
      Sec. 113. Landowner and rancher security enhancement.
      Sec. 114. Eradication of carrizo cane and salt cedar.
      Sec. 115. Southern border threat analysis.
                               Subtitle B--Personnel
      
      Sec. 131. Additional U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents and 
                                  officers.
      Sec. 132. U.S. Customs and Border Protection retention incentives.
      Sec. 133. Anti-Border Corruption Reauthorization Act.
                                 Subtitle C--Grants
      
      Sec. 141. Operation Stonegarden.
                    Subtitle D--Authorization of Appropriations
      
      Sec. 151. Authorization of appropriations.
       TITLE II--EMERGENCY PORT OF ENTRY PERSONNEL AND INFRASTRUCTURE FUNDING
      
      Sec. 201. Ports of entry infrastructure.
      Sec. 202. Secure communications.
      Sec. 203. Border security deployment program.
      Sec. 204. Pilot and upgrade of license plate readers at ports of entry.
      Sec. 205. Biometric exit data system.
      Sec. 206. Sense of Congress on cooperation between agencies.
      Sec. 207. Authorization of appropriations.
      
                              TITLE I--BORDER SECURITY
      
      SEC. 101. DEFINITIONS.
      
          In this title:
                  (1) Appropriate congressional committee.--The term 
              ``appropriate congressional committee'' has the meaning given 
              the term in section 2(2) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
              (6 U.S.C. 101(2)).
                  (2) Commissioner.--The term ``Commissioner'' means the 
              Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
                  (3) High traffic areas.--The term ``high traffic areas'' 
              has the meaning given the term in section 102(e)(1) of the 
              Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 
              1996, as amended by section 102 of this Act.
                  (4) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary 
              of Homeland Security.
                  (5) Situational awareness.--The term ``situational 
              awareness'' has the meaning given the term in section 
              1092(a)(7) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
              Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328; 6 U.S.C. 223(a)(7)).
      
                      Subtitle A--Infrastructure and Equipment
      
      SEC. 102. STRENGTHENING THE REQUIREMENTS FOR BARRIERS ALONG THE 
                    SOUTHERN BORDER.
      
          Section 102 of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant 
      Responsibility Act of 1996 (Division C of Public Law 104-208; 8 U.S.C. 
      1103 note) is amended--
                  (1) by amending subsection (a) to read as follows:
          ``(a) In General.--The Secretary of Homeland Security shall take 
      such actions as may be necessary (including the removal of obstacles to 
      detection of illegal entrants) to construct, install, deploy, operate, 
      and maintain tactical infrastructure and technology in the vicinity of 
      the United States border to deter, impede, and detect illegal activity 
      in high traffic areas.'';
                  (2) in subsection (b)--
                          (A) in the subsection heading, by striking 
                      ``Fencing'' and inserting ``Physical Barriers'';
                          (B) in paragraph (1)--
                                  (i) in subparagraph (A), by inserting 
                              ``situational awareness and'' before 
                              ``operational control'';
                                  (ii) by amending subparagraph (B) to read 
                              as follows:
                          ``(B) Tactical infrastructure.--
                                  ``(i) In general.--Not later than January 
                              20, 2021, the Secretary of Homeland Security, 
                              in carrying out subsection (a), shall deploy 
                              the most practical and effective tactical 
                              infrastructure available along the United 
                              States border for achieving situational 
                              awareness and operational control of the 
                              border.
                                  ``(ii) Tactical infrastructure defined.--In 
                              this subparagraph, the term `tactical 
                              infrastructure' includes--
                                          ``(I) boat ramps, access gates, 
                                      forward operating bases, checkpoints, 
                                      lighting, and roads; and
                                          ``(II) physical barriers (including 
                                      fencing, border wall system, and levee 
                                      walls).''; and
                                  (iii) in subparagraph (C)(i), by striking 
                              ``fencing is'' and inserting ``physical 
                              barriers are'';
                          (C) in paragraph (2)--
                                  (i) by striking ``Attorney General'' and 
                              inserting ``Secretary of Homeland Security''; 
                              and
                                  (ii) by striking ``construction of fences'' 
                              and inserting ``the construction of physical 
                              barriers''; and
                          (D) by amending paragraph (3) to read as follows:
                  ``(3) Agent safety.--In carrying out this section, the 
              Secretary of Homeland Security may not construct reinforced 
              fencing or tactical infrastructure, as the case may be, that 
              would, in any manner, impede or negatively affect the safety of 
              any officer or agent of the Department of Homeland Security or 
              of any other Federal agency.'';
                  (3) in subsection (c), by amending paragraph (1) to read as 
              follows:
                  ``(1) In general.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
              law, the Secretary of Homeland Security is authorized to waive 
              all legal requirements the Secretary, in the Secretary's sole 
              discretion, determines necessary to ensure the expeditious 
              construction, installation, operation, and maintenance of the 
              tactical infrastructure and technology under this section. Any 
              such decision by the Secretary shall be effective upon 
              publication in the Federal Register.''; and
                  (4) by adding after subsection (c) the following new 
              subsections:
          ``(d) Construction, Installation, and Maintenance of Technology.--
                  ``(1) In general.--Not later than January 20, 2021, the 
              Secretary of Homeland Security, in carrying out subsection (a), 
              shall deploy the most practical and effective technology 
              available along the United States border for achieving 
              situational awareness and operational control of the border.
                  ``(2) Technology defined.--In this subsection, the term 
              `technology' includes border surveillance and detection 
              technology, including--
                          ``(A) radar surveillance systems;
                          ``(B) Vehicle and Dismount Exploitation Radars 
                      (VADER);
                          ``(C) 3-dimensional, seismic acoustic detection and 
                      ranging border tunneling detection technology;
                          ``(D) sensors;
                          ``(E) unmanned cameras; and
                          ``(F) man-portable and mobile vehicle-mounted 
                      unmanned aerial vehicles.
          ``(e) Definitions.--In this section:
                  ``(1) High traffic areas.--The term `high traffic areas' 
              means sectors along the northern, southern, or coastal border 
              that--
                          ``(A) are within the responsibility of U.S. Customs 
                      and Border Protection; and
                          ``(B) have significant unlawful cross-border 
                      activity.
                  ``(2) Situational awareness defined.--The term `situational 
              awareness' has the meaning given the term in section 1092(a)(7) 
              of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
              (Public Law 114-328).''.
      
      SEC. 103. AIR AND MARINE OPERATIONS FLIGHT HOURS.
      
          (a) Increased Flight Hours.--The Secretary shall ensure that not 
      fewer than 95,000 annual flight hours are carried out by Air and Marine 
      Operations of U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
          (b) Unmanned Aerial System.--The Secretary shall ensure that Air 
      and Marine Operations operate unmanned aerial systems for not less than 
      24 hours per day for five days per week.
          (c) Contract Air Support Authorization.--The Commissioner shall 
      contract for the unfulfilled identified air support mission critical 
      hours, as identified by the Chief of the U.S. Border Patrol.
          (d) Primary Mission.--The Commissioner shall ensure that--
                  (1) the primary mission for Air and Marine Operations is to 
              directly support U.S. Border Patrol activities along the 
              southern border of the United States; and
                  (2) the Executive Associate Commissioner of Air and Marine 
              Operations assigns the greatest priority to support missions 
              established by the Commissioner to carry out the requirements 
              under this Act.
          (e) High-Demand Flight Hour Requirements.--In accordance with 
      subsection (c), the Commissioner shall ensure that U.S. Border Patrol 
      Sector Chiefs--
                  (1) identify critical flight hour requirements; and
                  (2) direct Air and Marine Operations to support requests 
              from Sector Chiefs as their primary mission.
          (f) Study and Report.--
                  (1) Study.--Not later than 60 days after the date of the 
              enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall commence a 
              comprehensive study on the realignment of the Air and Marine 
              Office as a directorate of U.S. Border Patrol.
                  (2) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
              enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the 
              Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives 
              and the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs 
              of the Senate a report containing the results of the study 
              under paragraph (1), including recommendations and timeframes 
              for implementing the realignment described in such paragraph.
      
      SEC. 104. CAPABILITY DEPLOYMENT TO SPECIFIC SECTORS AND REGIONS.
      
          (a) In General.--Not later than January 20, 2021, the Secretary, in 
      implementing section 102 of the Illegal Immigration Reform and 
      Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 (as amended by section 102 of this 
      Act), and acting through the appropriate component of the Department of 
      Homeland Security, shall deploy to each sector or region of the 
      southern border and the northern border, in a prioritized manner to 
      achieve situational awareness and operational control of such borders, 
      the following additional capabilities:
                  (1) San diego sector.--For the San Diego sector, the 
              following:
                          (A) Subterranean surveillance and detection 
                      technologies.
                          (B) To increase coastal maritime domain awareness, 
                      the following:
                                  (i) Deployable, lighter-than-air surface 
                              surveillance equipment.
                                  (ii) Unmanned aerial vehicles with maritime 
                              surveillance capability.
                                  (iii) Maritime patrol aircraft.
                                  (iv) Coastal radar surveillance systems.
                                  (v) Maritime signals intelligence 
                              capabilities.
                          (C) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (D) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (E) A rapid reaction capability supported by 
                      aviation assets.
                          (F) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                  (2) El centro sector.--For the El Centro sector, the 
              following:
                          (A) Tower-based surveillance technology.
                          (B) Deployable, lighter-than-air ground 
                      surveillance equipment.
                          (C) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (D) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (E) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (F) A rapid reaction capability supported by 
                      aviation assets.
                  (3) Yuma sector.--For the Yuma sector, the following:
                          (A) Tower-based surveillance technology.
                          (B) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance systems.
                          (C) Deployable, lighter-than-air ground 
                      surveillance equipment.
                          (D) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (E) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (F) A rapid reaction capability supported by 
                      aviation assets.
                          (G) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (H) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                  (4) Tucson sector.--For the Tucson sector, the following:
                          (A) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (B) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (C) Tower-based surveillance technology.
                          (D) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (E) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (F) Deployable, lighter-than-air ground 
                      surveillance equipment.
                          (G) A rapid reaction capability supported by 
                      aviation assets.
                  (5) El paso sector.--For the El Paso sector, the following:
                          (A) Tower-based surveillance technology.
                          (B) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (C) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (D) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance systems.
                          (E) Deployable, lighter-than-air ground 
                      surveillance equipment.
                          (F) A rapid reaction capability supported by 
                      aviation assets.
                          (G) Man-portable surveillance capabilities.
                  (6) Big bend sector.--For the Big Bend sector, the 
              following:
                          (A) Tower-based surveillance technology.
                          (B) Deployable, lighter-than-air ground 
                      surveillance equipment.
                          (C) Improved agent communications capabilities.
                          (D) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (E) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (F) A rapid reaction capability supported by 
                      aviation assets.
                          (G) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (H) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                  (7) Del rio sector.--For the Del Rio sector, the following:
                          (A) Increased monitoring for cross-river dams, 
                      culverts, and footpaths.
                          (B) Improved agent communications capabilities.
                          (C) Improved maritime capabilities in the Amistad 
                      National Recreation Area.
                          (D) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (E) A rapid reaction capability supported by 
                      aviation assets.
                          (F) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (G) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                  (8) Laredo sector.--For the Laredo sector, the following:
                          (A) Maritime detection resources for the Falcon 
                      Lake region.
                          (B) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (C) Increased monitoring for cross-river dams, 
                      culverts, and footpaths.
                          (D) Ultralight aircraft detection capability.
                          (E) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (F) A rapid reaction capability supported by 
                      aviation assets.
                          (G) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                  (9) Rio grande valley sector.--For the Rio Grande Valley 
              sector, the following:
                          (A) Deployable, lighter-than-air ground 
                      surveillance equipment.
                          (B) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (C) Ultralight aircraft detection capability.
                          (D) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (E) Increased monitoring for cross-river dams, 
                      culverts, footpaths.
                          (F) A rapid reaction capability supported by 
                      aviation assets.
                          (G) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (H) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                  (10) Eastern pacific maritime region.--For the Eastern 
              Pacific Maritime region, the following:
                          (A) Not later than two years after the date of the 
                      enactment of this Act, an increase of not less than ten 
                      percent in the number of overall cutter, boat, and 
                      aircraft hours spent conducting interdiction operations 
                      over the average number of such hours during the 
                      preceding three fiscal years.
                          (B) Increased maritime signals intelligence 
                      capabilities.
                          (C) To increase maritime domain awareness, the 
                      following:
                                  (i) Unmanned aerial vehicles with maritime 
                              surveillance capability.
                                  (ii) Increased maritime aviation patrol 
                              hours.
                          (D) Increased operational hours for maritime 
                      security components dedicated to joint counter-
                      smuggling and interdiction efforts with other Federal 
                      agencies, including the Deployable Specialized Forces 
                      of the Coast Guard.
                  (11) Caribbean and gulf maritime region.--For the Caribbean 
              and Gulf Maritime region, the following:
                          (A) Not later than two years after the date of the 
                      enactment of this Act, an increase of not less than ten 
                      percent in the number of overall cutter, boat, and 
                      aircraft hours spent conducting interdiction operations 
                      over the average number of such hours during the 
                      preceding three fiscal years.
                          (B) Increased maritime signals intelligence 
                      capabilities.
                          (C) Increased maritime domain awareness and 
                      surveillance capabilities, including the following:
                                  (i) Unmanned aerial vehicles with maritime 
                              surveillance capability.
                                  (ii) Increased maritime aviation patrol 
                              hours.
                                  (iii) Coastal radar surveillance systems 
                              with long range day and night cameras capable 
                              of providing 100 percent maritime domain 
                              awareness of the United States territorial 
                              waters surrounding Puerto Rico, Mona Island, 
                              Desecheo Island, Vieques Island, Culebra 
                              Island, Saint Thomas, Saint John, and Saint 
                              Croix.
                          (D) Increased operational hours for maritime 
                      security components dedicated to joint counter-
                      smuggling and interdiction efforts with other Federal 
                      agencies, including the Deployable Specialized Forces 
                      of the Coast Guard.
                  (12) Blaine sector.--For the Blaine sector, the following:
                          (A) Coastal radar surveillance systems.
                          (B) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (C) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (D) Improved agent communications systems.
                          (E) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (F) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (G) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (H) Modernized port of entry surveillance 
                      capabilities.
                          (I) Increased maritime interdiction capabilities.
                  (13) Spokane sector.--For the Spokane sector, the 
              following:
                          (A) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (B) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (C) Improved agent communications systems.
                          (D) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (E) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (F) Completion of six miles of the Bog Creek road.
                          (G) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (H) Modernized port of entry surveillance 
                      capabilities.
                          (I) Increased maritime interdiction capabilities.
                  (14) Havre sector.--For the Havre sector, the following:
                          (A) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (B) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (C) Improved agent communications systems.
                          (D) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (E) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (F) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (G) Modernized port of entry surveillance 
                      capabilities.
                  (15) Grand forks sector.--For the Grand Forks sector, the 
              following:
                          (A) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (B) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (C) Improved agent communications systems.
                          (D) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (E) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (F) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (G) Modernized port of entry surveillance 
                      capabilities.
                  (16) Detroit sector.--For the Detroit sector, the 
              following:
                          (A) Coastal radar surveillance systems.
                          (B) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (C) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (D) Improved agent communications systems.
                          (E) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (F) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (G) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (H) Modernized port of entry surveillance 
                      capabilities.
                          (I) Increased maritime interdiction capabilities.
                  (17) Buffalo sector.--For the Buffalo sector, the 
              following:
                          (A) Coastal radar surveillance systems.
                          (B) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (C) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (D) Improved agent communications systems.
                          (E) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (F) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (G) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (H) Modernized port of entry surveillance 
                      capabilities.
                          (I) Increased maritime interdiction capabilities.
                  (18) Swanton sector.--For the Swanton sector, the 
              following:
                          (A) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (B) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (C) Improved agent communications systems.
                          (D) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (E) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (F) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (G) Modernized port of entry surveillance 
                      capabilities.
                  (19) Houlton sector.--For the Houlton sector, the 
              following:
                          (A) Mobile vehicle-mounted and man-portable 
                      surveillance capabilities.
                          (B) Advanced unattended surveillance sensors.
                          (C) Improved agent communications systems.
                          (D) Increased flight hours for aerial detection, 
                      interdiction, and monitoring operations capability.
                          (E) Man-portable unmanned aerial vehicles.
                          (F) Ultralight aircraft detection capabilities.
                          (G) Modernized port of entry surveillance 
                      capabilities.
          (b) Tactical Flexibility.--
                  (1) Southern and northern land borders.--The Secretary may 
              alter the capability deployment referred to in this section if 
              the Secretary determines, after notifying the Committee on 
              Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of the Senate and 
              the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of 
              Representatives, that such alteration is required to enhance 
              situational awareness or operational control.
                  (2) Maritime border.--
                          (A) Notification.--The Commandant of the Coast 
                      Guard shall notify the Committee on Homeland Security 
                      and Governmental Affairs of the Senate, the Committee 
                      on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate, 
                      the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of 
                      Representatives, and the Committee on Transportation 
                      and Infrastructure of the House of Representatives 
                      regarding the capability deployments referred to in 
                      this section, including information relating to--
                                  (i) the number and types of assets and 
                              personnel deployed; and
                                  (ii) the impact such deployments have on 
                              the capability of the Coast Guard to conduct 
                              its mission in each of the sectors referred to 
                              in paragraphs (10) and (11) of subsection (a).
                          (B) Alteration.--The Commandant of the Coast Guard 
                      may alter the capability deployments referred to in 
                      this section if the Commandant--
                                  (i) determines, after consultation with the 
                              committees referred to in subparagraph (A), 
                              that such alteration is necessary; and
                                  (ii) not later than 30 days after making a 
                              determination under clause (i), notifies the 
                              committees referred to in such subparagraph 
                              regarding such alteration, including 
                              information relating to--
                                          (I) the number and types of assets 
                                      and personnel deployed pursuant to such 
                                      alteration; and
                                          (II) the impact such alteration has 
                                      on the capability of the Coast Guard to 
                                      conduct its mission in each of the 
                                      sectors referred to in subsection (a).
      
      SEC. 105. U.S. BORDER PATROL PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENTS.
      
          The Secretary shall upgrade existing physical infrastructure of the 
      Department of Homeland Security, and construct and acquire additional 
      physical infrastructure, including--
                  (1) U.S. Border Patrol stations;
                  (2) U.S. Border Patrol checkpoints;
                  (3) mobile command centers; and
                  (4) other necessary facilities, structures, and properties.
      
      SEC. 106. U.S. BORDER PATROL ACTIVITIES.
      
          The Chief of the U.S. Border Patrol shall direct agents of the U.S. 
      Border Patrol to patrol as close to the physical land border as 
      possible, consistent with the accessibility to such areas.
      
      SEC. 107. U.S. BORDER PATROL FORWARD OPERATING BASES.
      
          (a) Upgrades and Maintenance for Forward Operating Bases.--Not 
      later than January 20, 2021, the Secretary shall upgrade existing 
      forward operating bases of U.S. Border Patrol on or near the southern 
      border to ensure that such bases meet the minimum requirements set 
      forth in subsection (b).
          (b) Minimum Requirements.--Each forward operating base operated by 
      U.S. Customs and Border Protection shall be equipped with--
                  (1) perimeter security;
                  (2) short-term detention space (separate from existing 
              housing facilities);
                  (3) portable generators or shore power sufficient to meet 
              the power requirements for the base;
                  (4) interview rooms;
                  (5) adequate communications, including wide area network 
              connectivity;
                  (6) cellular service;
                  (7) potable water; and
                  (8) a helicopter landing zone.
      
      SEC. 108. BORDER SECURITY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM MANAGEMENT.
      
          (a) In General.--Subtitle C of title IV of the Homeland Security 
      Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 231 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the 
      following new section:
      
      ``SEC. 434. BORDER SECURITY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM MANAGEMENT.
      
          ``(a) Major Acquisition Program Defined.--In this section, the term 
      `major acquisition program' means an acquisition program of the 
      Department that is estimated by the Secretary to require an eventual 
      total expenditure of at least $300,000,000 (based on fiscal year 2017 
      constant dollars) over its life cycle cost.
          ``(b) Planning Documentation.--For each border security technology 
      acquisition program of the Department that is determined to be a major 
      acquisition program, the Secretary shall--
                  ``(1) ensure that each such program has a written 
              acquisition program baseline approved by the relevant 
              acquisition decision authority;
                  ``(2) document that each such program is meeting cost, 
              schedule, and performance thresholds as specified in such 
              baseline, in compliance with relevant departmental acquisition 
              policies and the Federal Acquisition Regulation; and
                  ``(3) have a plan for meeting program implementation 
              objectives by managing contractor performance.
          ``(c) Adherence to Standards.--The Secretary, acting through the 
      Under Secretary for Management and the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and 
      Border Protection, shall ensure border security technology acquisition 
      program managers who are responsible for carrying out this section 
      adhere to relevant internal control standards identified by the 
      Comptroller General of the United States. The Commissioner shall 
      provide information, as needed, to assist the Under Secretary in 
      monitoring management of border security technology acquisition 
      programs under this section.
          ``(d) Plan.--The Secretary, acting through the Under Secretary for 
      Management, in coordination with the Under Secretary for Science and 
      Technology and the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 
      shall submit a plan to the appropriate congressional committees for 
      testing, evaluating, and using independent verification and validation 
      resources for border security technology. Under the plan, new border 
      security technologies shall be evaluated through a series of 
      assessments, processes, and audits to ensure--
                  ``(1) compliance with relevant departmental acquisition 
              policies and the Federal Acquisition Regulation; and
                  ``(2) the effective use of taxpayer dollars.''.
          (b) Clerical Amendment.--The table of contents in section 1(b) of 
      the Homeland Security Act of 2002 is amended by inserting after the 
      item relating to section 433 the following new item:
      
      ``Sec. 434. Border security technology program management.''.
          (c) Prohibition on Additional Authorization of Appropriations.--No 
      additional funds are authorized to be appropriated to carry out section 
      434 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, as added by subsection (a). 
      Such section shall be carried out using amounts otherwise authorized 
      for such purposes.
      
      SEC. 109. NATIONAL GUARD SUPPORT TO SECURE THE SOUTHERN BORDER AND 
                    REIMBURSEMENT OF STATES FOR DEPLOYMENT OF THE NATIONAL 
                    GUARD AT THE SOUTHERN BORDER.
      
          (a) In General.--With the approval of the Secretary of Defense, the 
      Secretary or the Governor of a State may order any units or personnel 
      of the National Guard of such State to perform operations and missions 
      under section 502(f) of title 32, United States Code, along the 
      southern border for the purposes of assisting U.S. Customs and Border 
      Protection to secure the southern border.
          (b) Assignment of Operations and Missions.--
                  (1) In general.--National Guard units and personnel 
              deployed under subsection (a) may be assigned such operations 
              and missions specified in subsection (c) as may be necessary to 
              secure the southern border.
                  (2) Nature of duty.--The duty of National Guard personnel 
              performing operations and missions described in paragraph (1) 
              shall be full-time duty under title 32, United States Code.
          (c) Range of Operations and Missions.--The operations and missions 
      assigned under subsection (b) shall include the temporary authority 
      to--
                  (1) construct reinforced fencing or other barriers;
                  (2) conduct ground-based surveillance systems;
                  (3) operate unmanned and manned aircraft;
                  (4) provide radio communications interoperability between 
              U.S. Customs and Border Protection and State, local, and tribal 
              law enforcement agencies; and
                  (5) construct checkpoints along the southern border to 
              bridge the gap to long-term permanent checkpoints.
          (d) Materiel and Logistical Support.--The Secretary of Defense 
      shall deploy such materiel, equipment, and logistical support as may be 
      necessary to ensure success of the operations and missions conducted by 
      the National Guard under this section.
          (e) Exclusion From National Guard Personnel Strength Limitations.--
      National Guard personnel deployed under subsection (a) shall not be 
      included in--
                  (1) the calculation to determine compliance with limits on 
              end strength for National Guard personnel; or
                  (2) limits on the number of National Guard personnel that 
              may be placed on active duty for operational support under 
              section 115 of title 10, United States Code.
          (f) Reimbursement Required.--
                  (1) In general.--The Secretary of Defense shall reimburse 
              States for the cost of the deployment of any units or personnel 
              of the National Guard to perform operations and missions in 
              full-time State Active Duty in support of a southern border 
              mission. The Secretary of Defense may not seek reimbursement 
              from the Secretary for any reimbursements paid to States for 
              the costs of such deployments.
                  (2) Limitation.--The total amount of reimbursements under 
              this section may not exceed $35,000,000 for any fiscal year.
      
      SEC. 110. OPERATION PHALANX.
      
          (a) In General.--The Secretary of Defense, with the concurrence of 
      the Secretary, shall provide assistance to U.S. Customs and Border 
      Protection for purposes of increasing ongoing efforts to secure the 
      southern border.
          (b) Types of Assistance Authorized.--The assistance provided under 
      subsection (a) may include--
                  (1) deployment of manned aircraft, unmanned aerial 
              surveillance systems, and ground-based surveillance systems to 
              support continuous surveillance of the southern border; and
                  (2) intelligence analysis support.
          (c) Materiel and Logistical Support.--The Secretary of Defense may 
      deploy such materiel, equipment, and logistics support as may be 
      necessary to ensure the effectiveness of the assistance provided under 
      subsection (a).
          (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
      appropriated for the Department of Defense $75,000,000 to provide 
      assistance under this section. The Secretary of Defense may not seek 
      reimbursement from the Secretary for any assistance provided under this 
      section.
          (e) Reports.--
                  (1) In general.--Not later than 90 days after the date of 
              the enactment of this Act and annually thereafter, the 
              Secretary of Defense shall submit a report to the appropriate 
              congressional defense committees (as defined in section 
              101(a)(16) of title 10, United States Code) regarding any 
              assistance provided under subsection (a) during the period 
              specified in paragraph (3).
                  (2) Elements.--Each report under paragraph (1) shall 
              include, for the period specified in paragraph (3), a 
              description of--
                          (A) the assistance provided;
                          (B) the sources and amounts of funds used to 
                      provide such assistance; and
                          (C) the amounts obligated to provide such 
                      assistance.
                  (3) Period specified.--The period specified in this 
              paragraph is--
                          (A) in the case of the first report required under 
                      paragraph (1), the 90-day period beginning on the date 
                      of the enactment of this Act; and
                          (B) in the case of any subsequent report submitted 
                      under paragraph (1), the calendar year for which the 
                      report is submitted.
      
      SEC. 111. MERIDA INITIATIVE.
      
          (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that assistance 
      to Mexico, including assistance from the Department of State and the 
      Department of Defense and any aid related to the Merida Initiative 
      should--
                  (1) focus on providing enhanced border security and 
              judicial reform and support for Mexico's drug crop eradication 
              efforts; and
                  (2) return to its original focus and prioritize security, 
              training, and acquisition of equipment for Mexican security 
              forces involved in drug crop eradication efforts.
          (b) Assistance for Mexico.--The Secretary of State, in coordination 
      with the Secretary and the Secretary of Defense, shall provide 
      assistance to Mexico to--
                  (1) combat drug trafficking and related violence, organized 
              crime, and corruption;
                  (2) build a modern border security system capable of 
              preventing illegal migration;
                  (3) support border security and cooperation with United 
              States law enforcement agencies on border incursions;
                  (4) support judicial reform, institution building, and rule 
              of law activities; and
                  (5) provide for training and equipment for Mexican security 
              forces involved in drug crop eradication efforts.
          (c) Allocation of Funds; Report.--
                  (1) In general.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
              law, 50 percent of any assistance appropriated in any 
              appropriations Act to implement this section shall be withheld 
              until after the Secretary of State submits a written report to 
              the congressional committees specified in paragraph (3) 
              certifying that the Government of Mexico is--
                          (A) significantly reducing illegal migration, drug 
                      trafficking, and cross-border criminal activities; and
                          (B) improving the transparency and accountability 
                      of Mexican Federal police forces and working with 
                      Mexican State and municipal authorities to improve the 
                      transparency and accountability of Mexican State and 
                      municipal police forces.
                  (2) Matters to include.--The report required under 
              paragraph (1) shall include a description of--
                          (A) actions taken by the Government of Mexico to 
                      address the matters described in such paragraph; and
                          (B) any instances in which the Secretary determines 
                      that the actions taken by the Government of Mexico are 
                      inadequate to address such matters.
                  (3) Congressional committees specified.--The congressional 
              committees specified in this paragraph are--
                          (A) the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate;
                          (B) the Committee on Homeland Security and 
                      Governmental Affairs of the Senate;
                          (C) the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate;
                          (D) the Committee on Appropriations of the House of 
                      Representatives;
                          (E) the Committee on Homeland Security of the House 
                      of Representatives; and
                          (F) the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
                      Representatives.
          (d) Notifications.--Any assistance made available by the Secretary 
      of State under this section shall be subject to--
                  (1) the notification procedures set forth in section 634A 
              of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2394-1); and
                  (2) the notification requirements of--
                          (A) the Committee on Homeland Security and 
                      Governmental Affairs of the Senate;
                          (B) the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate;
                          (C) the Committee on Homeland Security of the House 
                      of Representatives; and
                          (D) the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
                      Representatives.
          (e) Spending Plan.--
                  (1) In general.--Not later than 45 days after the date of 
              the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit 
              to the congressional committees specified in paragraph (2) a 
              detailed spending plan for assistance to Mexico under this 
              section, which shall include a strategy, developed after 
              consulting with relevant authorities of the Government of 
              Mexico, for--
                          (A) combating drug trafficking and related violence 
                      and organized crime; and
                          (B) anti-corruption and rule of law activities, 
                      which shall include concrete goals, actions to be 
                      taken, budget proposals, and a description of 
                      anticipated results.
                  (2) Congressional committees specified.--The congressional 
              committees specified in this paragraph are--
                          (A) the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate;
                          (B) the Committee on Foreign Relations of the 
                      Senate;
                          (C) the Committee on Homeland Security and 
                      Governmental Affairs of the Senate;
                          (D) the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate;
                          (E) the Committee on Appropriations of the House of 
                      Representatives;
                          (F) the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House 
                      of Representatives;
                          (G) the Committee on Homeland Security of the House 
                      of Representatives; and
                          (H) the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
                      Representatives.
      
      SEC. 112. PROHIBITIONS ON ACTIONS THAT IMPEDE BORDER SECURITY ON 
                    CERTAIN FEDERAL LAND.
      
          (a) Prohibition on Interference With U.S. Customs and Border 
      Protection.--
                  (1) In general.--The Secretary concerned shall not impede, 
              prohibit, or restrict activities of U.S. Customs and Border 
              Protection on covered Federal land to execute search and rescue 
              operations or to prevent all unlawful entries into the United 
              States, including entries by terrorists, other unlawful aliens, 
              instruments of terrorism, narcotics, and other contraband 
              through the southern border or the northern border.
                  (2) Applicability.--The authority of U.S. Customs and 
              Border Protection to conduct activities described in paragraph 
              (1) on covered Federal land applies without regard to whether a 
              state of emergency exists.
          (b) Authorized Activities of U.S. Customs and Border Protection.--
                  (1) In general.--U.S. Customs and Border Protection shall 
              have immediate access to covered Federal land to conduct the 
              activities described in paragraph (2) on such land to prevent 
              all unlawful entries into the United States, including entries 
              by terrorists, other unlawful aliens, instruments of terrorism, 
              narcotics, and other contraband through the southern border or 
              the northern border.
                  (2) Activities described.--The activities described in this 
              paragraph are--
                          (A) the use of vehicles to patrol the border area, 
                      apprehend illegal entrants, and rescue individuals; and
                          (B) the construction, installation, operation and 
                      maintenance of tactical infrastructure and border 
                      technology described in section 102 of the Illegal 
                      Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 
                      1996 (as amended by section 102 of this Act).
          (c) Clarification Relating to Waiver Authority.--
                  (1) In general.--The activities of U.S. Customs and Border 
              Protection described in subsection (b)(2) may be carried out 
              without regard to the provisions of law specified in paragraph 
              (2).
                  (2) Provisions of law specified.--The provisions of law 
              specified in this section are all Federal, State, or other 
              laws, regulations, and legal requirements of, deriving from, or 
              related to the subject of, the following laws:
                          (A) The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 
                      (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.).
                          (B) The Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 
                      1531 et seq.).
                          (C) The Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 
                      U.S.C. 1251 et seq.) (commonly referred to as the 
                      ``Clean Water Act'').
                          (D) Division A of subtitle III of title 54, United 
                      States Code (54 U.S.C. 300301 et seq.) (formerly known 
                      as the ``National Historic Preservation Act'').
                          (E) The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (16 U.S.C. 703 et 
                      seq.).
                          (F) The Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.).
                          (G) The Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 
                      1979 (16 U.S.C. 470aa et seq.).
                          (H) The Safe Drinking Water Act (42 U.S.C. 300f et 
                      seq.).
                          (I) The Noise Control Act of 1972 (42 U.S.C. 4901 
                      et seq.).
                          (J) The Solid Waste Disposal Act (42 U.S.C. 6901 et 
                      seq.).
                          (K) The Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
                      Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (42 U.S.C. 9601 
                      et seq.).
                          (L) Chapter 3125 of title 54, United States Code 
                      (formerly known as the ``Archaeological and Historic 
                      Preservation Act'').
                          (M) The Antiquities Act (16 U.S.C. 431 et seq.).
                          (N) Chapter 3203 of title 54, United States Code 
                      (formerly known as the ``Historic Sites, Buildings, and 
                      Antiquities Act'').
                          (O) The Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (16 U.S.C. 1271 
                      et seq.).
                          (P) The Farmland Protection Policy Act (7 U.S.C. 
                      4201 et seq.).
                          (Q) The Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972 (16 
                      U.S.C. 1451 et seq.).
                          (R) The Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.).
                          (S) The Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 
                      1976 (43 U.S.C. 1701 et seq.).
                          (T) The National Wildlife Refuge System 
                      Administration Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 668dd et seq.).
                          (U) The Fish and Wildlife Act of 1956 (16 U.S.C. 
                      742a et seq.).
                          (V) The Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act (16 
                      U.S.C. 661 et seq.).
                          (W) Subchapter II of chapter 5, and chapter 7, of 
                      title 5, United States Code (commonly known as the 
                      ``Administrative Procedure Act'').
                          (X) The Otay Mountain Wilderness Act of 1999 
                      (Public Law 106-145).
                          (Y) Sections 102(29) and 103 of the California 
                      Desert Protection Act of 1994 (Public Law 103-433).
                          (Z) Division A of subtitle I of title 54, United 
                      States Code (formerly known as the ``National Park 
                      Service Organic Act'').
                          (AA) The National Park Service General Authorities 
                      Act (Public Law 91-383, 16 U.S.C. 1a-1 et seq.).
                          (BB) Sections 401(7), 403, and 404 of the National 
                      Parks and Recreation Act of 1978 (Public Law 95-625).
                          (CC) Sections 301(a) through (f) of the Arizona 
                      Desert Wilderness Act (Public Law 101-628).
                          (DD) The Rivers and Harbors Act of 1899 (33 U.S.C. 
                      403).
                          (EE) The Eagle Protection Act (16 U.S.C. 668 et 
                      seq.).
                          (FF) The Native American Graves Protection and 
                      Repatriation Act (25 U.S.C. 3001 et seq.).
                          (GG) The American Indian Religious Freedom Act (42 
                      U.S.C. 1996).
                          (HH) The Religious Freedom Restoration Act (42 
                      U.S.C. 2000bb).
                          (II) The National Forest Management Act of 1976 (16 
                      U.S.C. 1600 et seq.).
                          (JJ) The Multiple Use and Sustained Yield Act of 
                      1960 (16 U.S.C. 528 et seq.).
                  (3) Applicability of waiver to successor laws.--If a 
              provision of law specified in paragraph (2) was repealed and 
              incorporated into title 54, United States Code, after April 1, 
              2008, and before the date of the enactment of this Act, the 
              waiver described in paragraph (1) shall apply to the provision 
              of such title that corresponds to the provision of law 
              specified in paragraph (2) to the same extent the waiver 
              applied to that provision of law.
          (d) Protection of Legal Uses.--This section may not be construed to 
      provide--
                  (1) authority to restrict legal uses, such as grazing, 
              hunting, mining, or recreation or the use of backcountry 
              airstrips, on land under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of 
              the Interior or the Secretary of Agriculture; or
                  (2) any additional authority to restrict legal access to 
              such land.
          (e) Effect on State and Private Land.--This section shall--
                  (1) have no force or effect on State lands or private 
              lands; and
                  (2) not provide authority on or access to State lands or 
              private lands.
          (f) Tribal Sovereignty.--Nothing in this section may be construed 
      to supersede, replace, negate, or diminish treaties or other agreements 
      between the United States and Indian tribes.
          (g) Definitions.--In this section:
                  (1) Covered federal land.--The term ``covered Federal 
              land'' includes all land under the control of the Secretary 
              concerned that is located within 100 miles of the southern 
              border or the northern border.
                  (2) Secretary concerned.--The term ``Secretary concerned'' 
              means--
                          (A) with respect to land under the jurisdiction of 
                      the Department of Agriculture, the Secretary of 
                      Agriculture; and
                          (B) with respect to land under the jurisdiction of 
                      the Department of the Interior, the Secretary of the 
                      Interior.
      
      SEC. 113. LANDOWNER AND RANCHER SECURITY ENHANCEMENT.
      
          (a) Establishment of National Border Security Advisory Committee.--
      The Secretary shall establish a National Border Security Advisory 
      Committee, which--
                  (1) may advise, consult with, report to, and make 
              recommendations to the Secretary on matters relating to border 
              security matters, including--
                          (A) verifying security claims and the border 
                      security metrics established by the Department of 
                      Homeland Security under section 1092 of the National 
                      Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
                      Law 114-328; 6 U.S.C. 223); and
                          (B) discussing ways to improve the security of high 
                      traffic areas along the northern border and the 
                      southern border; and
                  (2) may provide, through the Secretary, recommendations to 
              Congress.
          (b) Consideration of Views.--The Secretary shall consider the 
      information, advice, and recommendations of the National Border 
      Security Advisory Committee in formulating policy regarding matters 
      affecting border security.
          (c) Membership.--The National Border Security Advisory Committee 
      shall consist of at least one member from each State who--
                  (1) has at least five years practical experience in border 
              security operations; or
                  (2) lives and works in the United States within 80 miles 
              from the southern border or the northern border.
          (d) Nonapplicability of Federal Advisory Committee Act.--The 
      Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) shall not apply to the 
      National Border Security Advisory Committee.
      
      SEC. 114. ERADICATION OF CARRIZO CANE AND SALT CEDAR.
      
          Not later than January 20, 2021, the Secretary, after coordinating 
      with the heads of the relevant Federal, State, and local agencies, 
      shall begin eradicating the carrizo cane plant and any salt cedar along 
      the Rio Grande River.
      
      SEC. 115. SOUTHERN BORDER THREAT ANALYSIS.
      
          (a) Threat Analysis.--
                  (1) Requirement.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
              the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the 
              Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives 
              and the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs 
              of the Senate a southern border threat analysis.
                  (2) Contents.--The analysis submitted under paragraph (1) 
              shall include an assessment of--
                          (A) current and potential terrorism and criminal 
                      threats posed by individuals and organized groups 
                      seeking--
                                  (i) to unlawfully enter the United States 
                              through the southern border; or
                                  (ii) to exploit security vulnerabilities 
                              along the southern border;
                          (B) improvements needed at and between ports of 
                      entry along the southern border to prevent terrorists 
                      and instruments of terror from entering the United 
                      States;
                          (C) gaps in law, policy, and coordination between 
                      State, local, or tribal law enforcement, international 
                      agreements, or tribal agreements that hinder effective 
                      and efficient border security, counterterrorism, and 
                      anti-human smuggling and trafficking efforts;
                          (D) the current percentage of situational awareness 
                      achieved by the Department along the southern border;
                          (E) the current percentage of operational control 
                      (as defined in section 2 of the Secure Fence Act of 
                      2006 (8 U.S.C. 1701 note)) achieved by the Department 
                      on the southern border; and
                          (F) traveler crossing times and any potential 
                      security vulnerability associated with prolonged wait 
                      times.
                  (3) Analysis requirements.--In compiling the southern 
              border threat analysis required under this subsection, the 
              Secretary shall consider and examine--
                          (A) the technology needs and challenges, including 
                      such needs and challenges identified as a result of 
                      previous investments that have not fully realized the 
                      security and operational benefits that were sought;
                          (B) the personnel needs and challenges, including 
                      such needs and challenges associated with recruitment 
                      and hiring;
                          (C) the infrastructure needs and challenges;
                          (D) the roles and authorities of State, local, and 
                      tribal law enforcement in general border security 
                      activities;
                          (E) the status of coordination among Federal, 
                      State, local, tribal, and Mexican law enforcement 
                      entities relating to border security;
                          (F) the terrain, population density, and climate 
                      along the southern border; and
                          (G) the international agreements between the United 
                      States and Mexico related to border security.
                  (4) Classified form.--To the extent possible, the Secretary 
              shall submit the southern border threat analysis required under 
              this subsection in unclassified form, but may submit a portion 
              of the threat analysis in classified form if the Secretary 
              determines such action is appropriate.
          (b) U.S. Border Patrol Strategic Plan.--
                  (1) In general.--Not later than the later of 180 days after 
              the submission of the threat analysis required under subsection 
              (a) or June 30, 2018, and every five years thereafter, the 
              Secretary, acting through the Chief of the U.S. Border Patrol, 
              and in consultation with the Office for Civil Rights and Civil 
              Liberties of the Department, shall issue a Border Patrol 
              Strategic Plan.
                  (2) Contents.--The Border Patrol Strategic Plan required 
              under this subsection shall include a consideration of--
                          (A) the southern border threat analysis required 
                      under subsection (a), with an emphasis on efforts to 
                      mitigate threats identified in such threat analysis;
                          (B) efforts to analyze and disseminate border 
                      security and border threat information between border 
                      security components of the Department and other 
                      appropriate Federal departments and agencies with 
                      missions associated with the southern border;
                          (C) efforts to increase situational awareness, 
                      including--
                                  (i) surveillance capabilities, including 
                              capabilities developed or utilized by the 
                              Department of Defense, and any appropriate 
                              technology determined to be excess by the 
                              Department of Defense; and
                                  (ii) the use of manned aircraft and 
                              unmanned aerial systems, including camera and 
                              sensor technology deployed on such assets;
                          (D) efforts to detect and prevent terrorists and 
                      instruments of terrorism from entering the United 
                      States;
                          (E) efforts to detect, interdict, and disrupt 
                      aliens and illicit drugs at the earliest possible 
                      point;
                          (F) efforts to focus intelligence collection to 
                      disrupt transnational criminal organizations outside of 
                      the international and maritime borders of the United 
                      States;
                          (G) efforts to ensure that any new border security 
                      technology can be operationally integrated with 
                      existing technologies in use by the Department;
                          (H) any technology required to maintain, support, 
                      and enhance security and facilitate trade at ports of 
                      entry, including nonintrusive detection equipment, 
                      radiation detection equipment, biometric technology, 
                      surveillance systems, and other sensors and technology 
                      that the Secretary determines to be necessary;
                          (I) operational coordination unity of effort 
                      initiatives of the border security components of the 
                      Department, including any relevant task forces of the 
                      Department;
                          (J) lessons learned from Operation Jumpstart and 
                      Operation Phalanx;
                          (K) cooperative agreements and information sharing 
                      with State, local, tribal, territorial, and other 
                      Federal law enforcement agencies that have jurisdiction 
                      on the northern border or the southern border;
                          (L) border security information received from 
                      consultation with State, local, tribal, territorial, 
                      and Federal law enforcement agencies that have 
                      jurisdiction on the northern border or the southern 
                      border, or in the maritime environment, and from border 
                      community stakeholders (including through public 
                      meetings with such stakeholders), including 
                      representatives from border agricultural and ranching 
                      organizations and representatives from business and 
                      civic organizations along the northern border or the 
                      southern border;
                          (M) staffing requirements for all departmental 
                      border security functions;
                          (N) a prioritized list of departmental research and 
                      development objectives to enhance the security of the 
                      southern border;
                          (O) an assessment of training programs, including 
                      training programs for--
                                  (i) identifying and detecting fraudulent 
                              documents;
                                  (ii) understanding the scope of enforcement 
                              authorities and the use of force policies; and
                                  (iii) screening, identifying, and 
                              addressing vulnerable populations, such as 
                              children and victims of human trafficking; and
                          (P) an assessment of how border security operations 
                      affect border crossing times.
      
                               Subtitle B--Personnel
      
      SEC. 131. ADDITIONAL U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION AGENTS AND 
                    OFFICERS.
      
          (a) Border Patrol Agents.--Not later than September 30, 2021, the 
      Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection shall hire, train, 
      and assign sufficient agents to maintain an active duty presence of not 
      fewer than 26,370 full-time equivalent agents.
          (b) CBP Officers.--In addition to positions authorized before the 
      date of the enactment of this Act and any existing officer vacancies 
      within U.S. Customs and Border Protection as of such date, the 
      Commissioner, subject to the availability of appropriations, shall 
      hire, train, and assign to duty, not later than September 30, 2021--
                  (1) sufficient U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers 
              to maintain an active duty presence of not fewer than 27,725 
              full-time equivalent officers; and
                  (2) 350 full-time support staff distributed among all 
              United States ports of entry.
          (c) Air and Marine Operations.--Not later than September 30, 2021, 
      the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection shall hire, 
      train, and assign sufficient agents for Air and Marine Operations of 
      U.S. Customs and Border Protection to maintain not fewer than 1,675 
      full-time equivalent agents.
          (d) U.S. Customs and Border Protection K-9 Units and Handlers.--
                  (1) K-9 units.--Not later than September 30, 2021, the 
              Commissioner shall deploy not fewer than 300 new K-9 units, 
              with supporting officers of U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
              and other required staff, at land ports of entry and 
              checkpoints, on the southern border and the northern border.
                  (2) Use of canines.--The Commissioner shall prioritize the 
              use of canines at the primary inspection lanes at land ports of 
              entry and checkpoints.
          (e) U.S. Customs and Border Protection Horseback Units.--
                  (1) Increase.--Not later than September 30, 2021, the 
              Commissioner shall increase the number of horseback units, with 
              supporting officers of U.S. Customs and Border Protection and 
              other required staff, by not fewer than 100 officers and 50 
              horses for security patrol along the southern border.
                  (2) Funding limitation.--Of the amounts authorized to be 
              appropriated for U.S. Customs and Border Protection under this 
              Act, not more than one percent may be used for the purchase of 
              additional horses, the construction of new stables, maintenance 
              and improvements of existing stables, and for feed, medicine, 
              and other resources needed to maintain the health and well-
              being of the horses that serve in the horseback units.
          (f) U.S. Customs and Border Protection Search Trauma and Rescue 
      Teams.--Not later than September 30, 2021, the Commissioner shall 
      increase by not fewer than 50 the number of officers engaged in search 
      and rescue activities along the southern border.
          (g) U.S. Customs and Border Protection Tunnel Detection and 
      Technology Program.--Not later than September 30, 2021, the 
      Commissioner shall increase by not fewer than 50 the number of officers 
      assisting task forces and activities related to deployment and 
      operation of border tunnel detection technology and apprehensions of 
      individuals using such tunnels for crossing into the United States, 
      drug trafficking, or human smuggling.
          (h) Agricultural Specialists.--Not later than September 30, 2021, 
      the Secretary shall hire, train, and assign to duty, in addition to the 
      officers and agents authorized under subsections (a) through (g), 631 
      U.S. Customs and Border Protection agricultural specialists to ports of 
      entry along the southern border and the northern border.
          (i) GAO Report.--If the staffing levels required under this section 
      are not achieved by September 30, 2021, the Comptroller General of the 
      United States shall conduct a review of the reasons why such levels 
      were not achieved.
      
      SEC. 132. U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION RETENTION INCENTIVES.
      
          (a) Definitions.--In this section:
                  (1) Covered area.--The term ``covered area'' means a 
              geographic area that the Secretary determines is in a remote 
              location or is an area for which it is difficult to find full-
              time permanent covered CBP employees, as compared to other 
              ports of entry or Border Patrol sectors.
                  (2) Covered cbp employee.--The term ``covered CBP 
              employee'' means an employee of U.S. Customs and Border 
              Protection performing activities that are critical to border 
              security or customs enforcement, as determined by the 
              Commissioner.
                  (3) Rate of basic pay.--The term ``rate of basic pay''--
                          (A) means the rate of pay fixed by law or 
                      administrative action for the position to which an 
                      employee is appointed before deductions and including 
                      any special rate under subpart C of part 530 of title 
                      5, Code of Federal Regulations, or similar payment 
                      under other legal authority, and any locality-based 
                      comparability payment under subpart F of part 531 of 
                      title 5, Code of Federal Regulations, or similar 
                      payment under other legal authority, but excluding 
                      additional pay of any other kind; and
                          (B) does not include additional pay, such as night 
                      shift differentials under section 5343(f) of title 5, 
                      United States Code, or environmental differentials 
                      under section 5343(c)(4) of such title.
                  (4) Special rate of pay.--The term ``special rate of pay'' 
              means a higher than normal rate of pay that exceeds the 
              otherwise applicable rate of basic pay for a similar covered 
              CBP employee at a land port of entry.
          (b) Hiring Incentives.--
                  (1) In general.--To the extent necessary for U.S. Customs 
              and Border Protection to hire, train, and deploy qualified 
              officers and employees, and to the extent necessary to meet the 
              requirements set forth in section 131, the Commissioner, with 
              the approval of the Secretary, may pay a hiring bonus of 
              $10,000 to a covered CBP employee, after the covered CBP 
              completes initial basic training and executes a written 
              agreement required under paragraph (2).
                  (2) Written agreement.--The payment of a hiring bonus to a 
              covered CBP employee under paragraph (1) is contingent upon the 
              covered CBP employee entering into a written agreement with 
              U.S. Customs and Border Protection to complete more than two 
              years of employment with U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
              beginning on the date on which the agreement is signed. Such 
              agreement shall include--
                          (A) the amount of the hiring bonus;
                          (B) the conditions under which the agreement may be 
                      terminated before the required period of service is 
                      completed and the effect of such termination;
                          (C) the length of the required service period; and
                          (D) any other terms and conditions under which the 
                      hiring bonus is payable, subject to the requirements 
                      under this section.
                  (3) Form of payment.--A signing bonus paid to a covered CBP 
              employee under paragraph (1) shall be paid in a single payment 
              after the covered CBP employee completes initial basic training 
              and enters on duty and executed the agreement under paragraph 
              (2).
                  (4) Exclusion of signing bonus from rate of pay.--A signing 
              bonus paid to a covered CBP employee under paragraph (1) shall 
              not be considered part of the rate of basic pay of the covered 
              CBP employee for any purpose.
                  (5) Effective date and sunset.--This subsection shall take 
              effect on the date of the enactment of this Act and shall 
              remain in effect until the earlier of--
                          (A) September 30, 2019; or
                          (B) the date on which U.S. Customs and Border 
                      Protection has 26,370 full-time equivalent agents.
          (c) Retention Incentives.--
                  (1) In general.--To the extent necessary for U.S. Customs 
              and Border Protection to retain qualified employees, and to the 
              extent necessary to meet the requirements set forth in section 
              131, the Commissioner, with the approval of the Secretary, may 
              pay a retention incentive to a covered CBP employee who has 
              been employed with U.S. Customs and Border Protection for a 
              period of longer than two consecutive years, and the 
              Commissioner determines that, in the absence of the retention 
              incentive, the covered CBP employee would likely--
                          (A) leave the Federal service; or
                          (B) transfer to, or be hired into, a different 
                      position within the Department (other than another 
                      position in CBP).
                  (2) Written agreement.--The payment of a retention 
              incentive to a covered CBP employee under paragraph (1) is 
              contingent upon the covered CBP employee entering into a 
              written agreement with U.S. Customs and Border Protection to 
              complete more than two years of employment with U.S. Customs 
              and Border Protection beginning on the date on which the CBP 
              employee enters on duty and the agreement is signed. Such 
              agreement shall include--
                          (A) the amount of the retention incentive;
                          (B) the conditions under which the agreement may be 
                      terminated before the required period of service is 
                      completed and the effect of such termination;
                          (C) the length of the required service period; and
                          (D) any other terms and conditions under which the 
                      retention incentive is payable, subject to the 
                      requirements under this section.
                  (3) Criteria.--When determining the amount of a retention 
              incentive paid to a covered CBP employee under paragraph (1), 
              the Commissioner shall consider--
                          (A) the length of the Federal service and 
                      experience of the covered CBP employee;
                          (B) the salaries for law enforcement officers in 
                      other Federal agencies; and
                          (C) the costs of replacing the covered CBP 
                      employee, including the costs of training a new 
                      employee.
                  (4) Amount of retention incentive.--A retention incentive 
              paid to a covered CBP employee under paragraph (1)--
                          (A) shall be approved by the Secretary and the 
                      Commissioner;
                          (B) shall be stated as a percentage of the 
                      employee's rate of basic pay for the service period 
                      associated with the incentive; and
                          (C) may not exceed $25,000 for each year of the 
                      written agreement.
                  (5) Form of payment.--A retention incentive paid to a 
              covered CBP employee under paragraph (1) shall be paid as a 
              single payment at the end of the fiscal year in which the 
              covered CBP employee entered into an agreement under paragraph 
              (2), or in equal installments during the life of the service 
              agreement, as determined by the Commissioner.
                  (6) Exclusion of retention incentive from rate of pay.--A 
              retention incentive paid to a covered CBP employee under 
              paragraph (1) shall not be considered part of the rate of basic 
              pay of the covered CBP employee for any purpose.
          (d) Pilot Program on Special Rates of Pay in Covered Areas.--
                  (1) In general.--The Commissioner may establish a pilot 
              program to assess the feasibility and advisability of using 
              special rates of pay for covered CBP employees in covered 
              areas, as designated on the date of the enactment of this Act, 
              to help meet the requirements set forth in section 131.
                  (2) Maximum amount.--The rate of basic pay of a covered CBP 
              employee paid a special rate of pay under the pilot program may 
              not exceed 125 percent of the otherwise applicable rate of 
              basic pay of the covered CBP employee.
                  (3) Termination.--
                          (A) In general.--Except as provided in subparagraph 
                      (B), the pilot program shall terminate on the date that 
                      is two years after the date of the enactment of this 
                      Act.
                          (B) Extension.--If the Secretary determines that 
                      the pilot program is performing satisfactorily and 
                      there are metrics that prove its success in meeting the 
                      requirements set forth in section 131, the Secretary 
                      may extend the pilot program until the date that is 
                      four years after the date of the enactment of this Act.
                  (4) Report to congress.--Shortly after the pilot program 
              terminates under paragraph (3), the Commissioner shall submit a 
              report to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
              Affairs of the Senate, the Committee on the Judiciary of the 
              Senate, the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of 
              Representatives, and the Committee on the Judiciary of the 
              House of Representatives that details--
                          (A) the total amount paid to covered CBP employees 
                      under the pilot program; and
                          (B) the covered areas in which the pilot program 
                      was implemented.
          (e) Salaries.--
                  (1) In general.--Section 101(b) of the Enhanced Border 
              Security and Visa Entry Reform Act of 2002 (8 U.S.C. 1711(b)) 
              is amended to read as follows:
          ``(b) Authorization of Appropriations for CBP Employees.--There are 
      authorized to be appropriated to U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
      such sums as may be necessary to increase, effective January 1, 2018, 
      the annual rate of basic pay for U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
      employees who have completed at least one year of service--
                  ``(1) to the annual rate of basic pay payable for positions 
              at GS-12, step 1 of the General Schedule under subchapter III 
              of chapter 53 of title 5, United States Code, for officers and 
              agents who are receiving the annual rate of basic pay payable 
              for a position at GS-5, GS-6, GS-7, GS-8, or GS-9 of the 
              General Schedule;
                  ``(2) to the annual rate of basic pay payable for positions 
              at GS-12, step 10 of the General Schedule under such subchapter 
              for supervisory CBP officers and supervisory agents who are 
              receiving the annual rate of pay payable for a position at GS-
              10 of the General Schedule;
                  ``(3) to the annual rate of basic pay payable for positions 
              at GS-14, step 1 of the General Schedule under such subchapter 
              for supervisory CBP officers and supervisory agents who are 
              receiving the annual rate of pay payable for a position at GS-
              11 of the General Schedule;
                  ``(4) to the annual rate of basic pay payable for positions 
              at GS-12, step 10 of the General Schedule under such subchapter 
              for supervisory CBP officers and supervisory Border Patrol 
              agents who are receiving the annual rate of pay payable for a 
              position at GS-12 or GS-13 of the General Schedule; and
                  ``(5) to the annual rate of basic pay payable for positions 
              at GS-8, GS-9, or GS-10 of the General Schedule for assistants 
              who are receiving an annual rate of pay payable for positions 
              at GS-5, GS-6, or GS-7 of the General Schedule, 
              respectively.''.
                  (2) Hardship duty pay.--In addition to compensation to 
              which Border Patrol agents are otherwise entitled, Border 
              Patrol agents who are assigned to rural areas shall be entitled 
              to receive hardship duty pay, in lieu of a retention incentive 
              under subsection (b), in an amount determined by the 
              Commissioner, which may not exceed the rate of special pay to 
              which members of a uniformed service are entitled under section 
              310 of title 37, United States Code.
                  (3) Overtime limitation.--Section 5(c)(1) of the Act of 
              February 13, 1911 (19 U.S.C. 267(c)(1)), is amended by striking 
              ``$25,000'' and inserting ``$45,000''.
      
      SEC. 133. ANTI-BORDER CORRUPTION REAUTHORIZATION ACT.
      
          (a) Short Title.--This section may be cited as the ``Anti-Border 
      Corruption Reauthorization Act of 2017''.
          (b) Hiring Flexibility.--Section 3 of the Anti-Border Corruption 
      Act of 2010 (6 U.S.C. 221) is amended by striking subsection (b) and 
      inserting the following new subsections:
          ``(b) Waiver Authority.--The Commissioner of U.S. Customs and 
      Border Protection may waive the application of subsection (a)(1)--
                  ``(1) to a current, full-time law enforcement officer 
              employed by a State or local law enforcement agency who--
                          ``(A) has continuously served as a law enforcement 
                      officer for not fewer than three years;
                          ``(B) is authorized by law to engage in or 
                      supervise the prevention, detection, investigation, or 
                      prosecution of, or the incarceration of any person for, 
                      any violation of law, and has statutory powers for 
                      arrest or apprehension;
                          ``(C) is not currently under investigation, has not 
                      been found to have engaged in criminal activity or 
                      serious misconduct, has not resigned from a law 
                      enforcement officer position under investigation or in 
                      lieu of termination, and has not been dismissed from a 
                      law enforcement officer position; and
                          ``(D) has, within the past ten years, successfully 
                      completed a polygraph examination as a condition of 
                      employment with such officer's current law enforcement 
                      agency;
                  ``(2) to a current, full-time Federal law enforcement 
              officer who--
                          ``(A) has continuously served as a law enforcement 
                      officer for not fewer than three years;
                          ``(B) is authorized to make arrests, conduct 
                      investigations, conduct searches, make seizures, carry 
                      firearms, and serve orders, warrants, and other 
                      processes;
                          ``(C) is not currently under investigation, has not 
                      been found to have engaged in criminal activity or 
                      serious misconduct, has not resigned from a law 
                      enforcement officer position under investigation or in 
                      lieu of termination, and has not been dismissed from a 
                      law enforcement officer position; and
                          ``(D) holds a current Tier 4 background 
                      investigation or current Tier 5 background 
                      investigation; and
                  ``(3) to a member of the Armed Forces (or a reserve 
              component thereof) or a veteran, if such individual--
                          ``(A) has served in the Armed Forces for not fewer 
                      than three years;
                          ``(B) holds, or has held within the past five 
                      years, a Secret, Top Secret, or Top Secret/Sensitive 
                      Compartmented Information clearance;
                          ``(C) holds, or has undergone within the past five 
                      years, a current Tier 4 background investigation or 
                      current Tier 5 background investigation;
                          ``(D) received, or is eligible to receive, an 
                      honorable discharge from service in the Armed Forces 
                      and has not engaged in criminal activity or committed a 
                      serious military or civil offense under the Uniform 
                      Code of Military Justice; and
                          ``(E) was not granted any waivers to obtain the 
                      clearance referred to subparagraph (B).
          ``(c) Termination of Waiver Authority.--The authority to issue a 
      waiver under subsection (b) shall terminate on the date that is four 
      years after the date of the enactment of the Border Security for 
      America Act of 2017.''.
          (c) Supplemental Commissioner Authority and Definitions.--
                  (1) Supplemental commissioner authority.--Section 4 of the 
              Anti-Border Corruption Act of 2010 is amended to read as 
              follows:
      
      ``SEC. 4. SUPPLEMENTAL COMMISSIONER AUTHORITY.
      
          ``(a) Nonexemption.--An individual who receives a waiver under 
      section 3(b) is not exempt from other hiring requirements relating to 
      suitability for employment and eligibility to hold a national security 
      designated position, as determined by the Commissioner of U.S. Customs 
      and Border Protection.
          ``(b) Background Investigations.--Any individual who receives a 
      waiver under section 3(b) who holds a current Tier 4 background 
      investigation shall be subject to a Tier 5 background investigation.
          ``(c) Administration of Polygraph Examination.--The Commissioner of 
      U.S. Customs and Border Protection is authorized to administer a 
      polygraph examination to an applicant or employee who is eligible for 
      or receives a waiver under section 3(b) if information is discovered 
      before the completion of a background investigation that results in a 
      determination that a polygraph examination is necessary to make a final 
      determination regarding suitability for employment or continued 
      employment, as the case may be.''.
                  (2) Report.--The Anti-Border Corruption Act of 2010, as 
              amended by paragraph (1), is further amended by adding at the 
              end the following new section:
      
      ``SEC. 5. REPORTING.
      
          ``(a) Annual Report.--Not later than one year after the date of the 
      enactment of this section and annually thereafter while the waiver 
      authority under section 3(b) is in effect, the Commissioner of U.S. 
      Customs and Border Protection shall submit to Congress a report that 
      includes, with respect to each such reporting period--
                  ``(1) the number of waivers requested, granted, and denied 
              under section 3(b);
                  ``(2) the reasons for any denials of such waiver;
                  ``(3) the percentage of applicants who were hired after 
              receiving a waiver;
                  ``(4) the number of instances that a polygraph was 
              administered to an applicant who initially received a waiver 
              and the results of such polygraph;
                  ``(5) an assessment of the current impact of the polygraph 
              waiver program on filling law enforcement positions at U.S. 
              Customs and Border Protection; and
                  ``(6) additional authorities needed by U.S. Customs and 
              Border Protection to better utilize the polygraph waiver 
              program for its intended goals.
          ``(b) Additional Information.--The first report submitted under 
      subsection (a) shall include--
                  ``(1) an analysis of other methods of employment 
              suitability tests that detect deception and could be used in 
              conjunction with traditional background investigations to 
              evaluate potential employees for suitability; and
                  ``(2) a recommendation regarding whether a test referred to 
              in paragraph (1) should be adopted by U.S. Customs and Border 
              Protection when the polygraph examination requirement is waived 
              pursuant to section 3(b).''.
                  (3) Definitions.--The Anti-Border Corruption Act of 2010, 
              as amended by paragraphs (1) and (2), is further amended by 
              adding at the end the following new section:
      
      ``SEC. 6. DEFINITIONS.
      
          ``In this Act:
                  ``(1) Federal law enforcement officer.--The term `Federal 
              law enforcement officer' means a `law enforcement officer' 
              defined in section 8331(20) or 8401(17) of title 5, United 
              States Code.
                  ``(2) Serious military or civil offense.--The term `serious 
              military or civil offense' means an offense for which--
                          ``(A) a member of the Armed Forces may be 
                      discharged or separated from service in the Armed 
                      Forces; and
                          ``(B) a punitive discharge is, or would be, 
                      authorized for the same or a closely related offense 
                      under the Manual for Court-Martial, as pursuant to Army 
                      Regulation 635-200 chapter 14-12.
                  ``(3) Tier 4; tier 5.--The terms `Tier 4' and `Tier 5' with 
              respect to background investigations have the meaning given 
              such terms under the 2012 Federal Investigative Standards.
                  ``(4) Veteran.--The term `veteran' has the meaning given 
              such term in section 101(2) of title 38, United States Code.''.
          (d) Polygraph Examiners.--Not later than September 30, 2021, the 
      Secretary shall increase to not fewer than 150 the number of trained 
      full-time equivalent polygraph examiners for administering polygraphs 
      under the Anti-Border Corruption Act of 2010.
      
                                 Subtitle C--Grants
      
      SEC. 141. OPERATION STONEGARDEN.
      
          (a) In General.--Subtitle A of title XX of the Homeland Security 
      Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the 
      following new section:
      
      ``SEC. 2009. OPERATION STONEGARDEN.
      
          ``(a) Establishment.--There is established in the Department a 
      program to be known as `Operation Stonegarden', under which the 
      Secretary, acting through the Administrator, shall make grants to 
      eligible law enforcement agencies, through the State administrative 
      agency, to enhance border security in accordance with this section.
          ``(b) Eligible Recipients.--To be eligible to receive a grant under 
      this section, a law enforcement agency--
                  ``(1) shall be located in--
                          ``(A) a State bordering Canada or Mexico; or
                          ``(B) a State or territory with a maritime border; 
                      and
                  ``(2) shall be involved in an active, ongoing, U.S. Customs 
              and Border Protection operation coordinated through a sector 
              office.
          ``(c) Permitted Uses.--The recipient of a grant under this section 
      may use such grant for--
                  ``(1) equipment, including maintenance and sustainment 
              costs;
                  ``(2) personnel, including overtime and backfill, in 
              support of enhanced border law enforcement activities;
                  ``(3) any activity permitted for Operation Stonegarden 
              under the Department of Homeland Security's Fiscal Year 2017 
              Homeland Security Grant Program Notice of Funding Opportunity; 
              and
                  ``(4) any other appropriate activity, as determined by the 
              Administrator, in consultation with the Commissioner of U.S. 
              Customs and Border Protection.
          ``(d) Period of Performance.--The Secretary shall award grants 
      under this section to grant recipients for a period of not less than 36 
      months.
          ``(e) Report.--For each of the fiscal years 2018 through 2022, the 
      Administrator shall submit to the Committee on Homeland Security and 
      Governmental Affairs of the Senate and the Committee on Homeland 
      Security of the House of Representatives a report that contains 
      information on the expenditure of grants made under this section by 
      each grant recipient.
          ``(f) Authorization of Appropriations.--There is authorized to be 
      appropriated $110,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2018 through 
      2022 for grants under this section.''.
          (b) Conforming Amendment.--Subsection (a) of section 2002 of the 
      Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 603) is amended to read as 
      follows:
          ``(a) Grants Authorized.--The Secretary, through the Administrator, 
      may award grants under sections 2003, 2004, and 2009 to State, local, 
      and tribal governments, as appropriate.''.
          (c) Clerical Amendment.--The table of contents in section 1(b) of 
      the Homeland Security Act of 2002 is amended by inserting after the 
      item relating to section 2008 the following:
      
      ``Sec. 2009. Operation Stonegarden.''.
      
                    Subtitle D--Authorization of Appropriations
      
      SEC. 151. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.
      
          (a) In General.--In addition to amounts otherwise authorized to be 
      appropriated, there are authorized to be appropriated for each of the 
      fiscal years 2018 through 2021, $2,500,000,000 to implement this title 
      and the amendments made by this title, of which--
                  (1) $10,000,000 shall be used by the Department of Homeland 
              Security to implement Vehicle and Dismount Exploitation Radars 
              (VADER) in border security operations; and
                  (2) $200,000,000 shall be used by the Department of State 
              to implement section 111.
          (b) High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Program.--Section 
      707(p)(5) of the Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization 
      Act of 1998 (21 U.S.C. 1706(p)(5)) is amended by striking ``to the 
      Office of National Drug Control Policy'' and all that follows and 
      inserting ``$280,000,000 to the Office of National Drug Control Policy 
      for each of fiscal years 2018 through 2021 to carry out this 
      section.''.
      
       TITLE II--EMERGENCY PORT OF ENTRY PERSONNEL AND INFRASTRUCTURE FUNDING
      
      SEC. 201. PORTS OF ENTRY INFRASTRUCTURE.
      
          (a) Additional Ports of Entry.--
                  (1) Authority.--The Secretary may construct new ports of 
              entry along the northern border and southern border and 
              determine the location of any such new ports of entry.
                  (2) Consultation.--
                          (A) Requirement to consult.--The Secretary shall 
                      consult with the Secretary of the Interior, the 
                      Secretary of Agriculture, the Administrator of General 
                      Services, and appropriate representatives of State and 
                      local governments, and Indian tribes, and property 
                      owners in the United States prior to selecting a 
                      location for any new port constructed pursuant to 
                      paragraph (1).
                          (B) Considerations.--The purpose of the 
                      consultations required by subparagraph (A) shall be to 
                      minimize any negative impacts of such a new port on the 
                      environment, culture, commerce, and quality of life of 
                      the communities and residents located near such new 
                      port.
          (b) Expansion and Modernization of High-Volume Southern Border 
      Ports of Entry.--Not later than September 30, 2021, the Secretary shall 
      expand the primary and secondary inspection lanes for vehicle, cargo, 
      and pedestrian inbound and outbound inspection lanes at the top ten 
      high-volume ports of entry on the southern border, as determined by the 
      Secretary.
          (c) Port of Entry Prioritization.--Prior to constructing any new 
      ports of entry pursuant to subsection (a), the Secretary shall complete 
      the expansion and modernization of ports of entry pursuant to 
      subsection (b) to the extent practicable.
      
      SEC. 202. SECURE COMMUNICATIONS.
      
          (a) In General.--The Secretary shall ensure that each U.S. Customs 
      and Border Protection and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement 
      officer or agent, if appropriate, is equipped with a secure two-way 
      communication device, supported by system interoperability and LTE 
      network capability, that allows each such officer to communicate--
                  (1) between ports of entry and inspection stations; and
                  (2) with other Federal, State, tribal, and local law 
              enforcement entities.
          (b) Land Border Agents and Officers.--The Secretary shall ensure 
      that each U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent or officer assigned 
      or required to patrol on foot, by horseback, or with a canine unit, in 
      remote mission critical locations, including the Rio Grand Valley and 
      Big Bend, and at border checkpoints, has a multiband, encrypted 
      portable radio with military-grade high frequency capability to allow 
      for beyond line-of-sight communications.
      
      SEC. 203. BORDER SECURITY DEPLOYMENT PROGRAM.
      
          (a) Expansion.--Not later than September 30, 2021, the Secretary 
      shall fully implement the Border Security Deployment Program of the 
      U.S. Customs and Border Protection and expand the integrated 
      surveillance and intrusion detection system at land ports of entry 
      along the southern border and the northern border.
          (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--In addition to amounts 
      otherwise authorized to be appropriated for such purpose, there is 
      authorized to be appropriated $33,000,000 for fiscal year 2018 to carry 
      out subsection (a).
      
      SEC. 204. PILOT AND UPGRADE OF LICENSE PLATE READERS AT PORTS OF ENTRY.
      
          (a) Upgrade.--Not later than one year after the date of the 
      enactment of this Act, the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border 
      Protection shall upgrade all existing license plate readers on the 
      northern and southern borders on incoming and outgoing vehicle lanes.
          (b) Pilot Program.--Not later than 90 days after the date of the 
      enactment of this Act, the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border 
      Protection shall conduct a one-month pilot program on the southern 
      border using license plate readers for one to two cargo lanes at the 
      top three high-volume land ports of entry or checkpoints to determine 
      their effectiveness in reducing cross-border wait times for commercial 
      traffic and tractor-trailers.
          (c) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
      enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall report to the Committee on 
      Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of the Senate, the Committee 
      on the Judiciary of the Senate, the Committee on Homeland Security of 
      the House of Representatives, and the Committee on the Judiciary of the 
      House of Representatives the results of the pilot program under 
      subsection (b) and make recommendations for implementing use of such 
      technology on the southern border.
          (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--In addition to amounts 
      otherwise authorized to be appropriated for such purpose, there is 
      authorized to be appropriated $125,000,000 for fiscal year 2018 to 
      carry out subsection (a).
      
      SEC. 205. BIOMETRIC EXIT DATA SYSTEM.
      
          (a) In General.--Subtitle B of title IV of the Homeland Security 
      Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 211 et seq.) is amended by inserting after 
      section 417 the following new section:
      
      ``SEC. 418. BIOMETRIC ENTRY-EXIT.
      
          ``(a) Establishment.--The Secretary shall--
                  ``(1) not later than 180 days after the date of the 
              enactment of this section, submit to the Committee on Homeland 
              Security and Governmental Affairs and the Committee on the 
              Judiciary of the Senate and the Committee on Homeland Security 
              and the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
              Representatives an implementation plan to establish a biometric 
              exit data system to complete the integrated biometric entry and 
              exit data system required under section 7208 of the 
              Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (8 
              U.S.C. 1365b), including--
                          ``(A) an integrated master schedule and cost 
                      estimate, including requirements and design, 
                      development, operational, and maintenance costs of such 
                      a system, that takes into account prior reports on such 
                      matters issued by the Government Accountability Office 
                      and the Department;
                          ``(B) cost-effective staffing and personnel 
                      requirements of such a system that leverages existing 
                      resources of the Department that takes into account 
                      prior reports on such matters issued by the Government 
                      Accountability Office and the Department;
                          ``(C) a consideration of training programs 
                      necessary to establish such a system that takes into 
                      account prior reports on such matters issued by the 
                      Government Accountability Office and the Department;
                          ``(D) a consideration of how such a system will 
                      affect wait times that takes into account prior reports 
                      on such matter issued by the Government Accountability 
                      Office and the Department;
                          ``(E) information received after consultation with 
                      private sector stakeholders, including the--
                                  ``(i) trucking industry;
                                  ``(ii) airport industry;
                                  ``(iii) airline industry;
                                  ``(iv) seaport industry;
                                  ``(v) travel industry; and
                                  ``(vi) biometric technology industry;
                          ``(F) a consideration of how trusted traveler 
                      programs in existence as of the date of the enactment 
                      of this Act may be impacted by, or incorporated into, 
                      such a system;
                          ``(G) defined metrics of success and milestones;
                          ``(H) identified risks and mitigation strategies to 
                      address such risks; and
                          ``(I) a consideration of how other countries have 
                      implemented a biometric exit data system; and
                  ``(2) not later than two years after the date of the 
              enactment of this section, establish a biometric exit data 
              system at the--
                          ``(A) 15 United States airports that support the 
                      highest volume of international air travel, as 
                      determined by available Federal flight data;
                          ``(B) 15 United States seaports that support the 
                      highest volume of international sea travel, as 
                      determined by available Federal travel data; and
                          ``(C) 15 United States land ports of entry that 
                      support the highest volume of vehicle, pedestrian, and 
                      cargo crossings, as determined by available Federal 
                      border crossing data.
          ``(b) Implementation.--
                  ``(1) Pilot program at land ports of entry for non-
              pedestrian outbound traffic.--Not later than 18 months after 
              the date of the enactment of this section, the Secretary, in 
              collaboration with industry stakeholders, shall establish a 
              six-month pilot program to test the biometric exit data system 
              referred to in subsection (a)(2) on non-pedestrian outbound 
              traffic at not fewer than three land ports of entry with 
              significant cross-border traffic, including at not fewer than 
              two land ports of entry on the southern land border and at 
              least one land port of entry on the northern land border. Such 
              pilot program may include a consideration of more than one 
              biometric mode, and shall be implemented to determine the 
              following:
                          ``(A) How a nationwide implementation of such 
                      biometric exit data system at land ports of entry shall 
                      be carried out.
                          ``(B) The infrastructure required to carry out 
                      subparagraph (A).
                          ``(C) The effects of such pilot program on 
                      legitimate travel and trade.
                          ``(D) The effects of such pilot program on wait 
                      times, including processing times, for such non-
                      pedestrian traffic.
                          ``(E) Its effectiveness in combating terrorism.
                  ``(2) At land ports of entry for non-pedestrian outbound 
              traffic.--
                          ``(A) In general.--Not later than five years after 
                      the date of the enactment of this section, the 
                      Secretary shall expand the biometric exit data system 
                      referred to in subsection (a)(2) to all land ports of 
                      entry, and such system shall apply only in the case of 
                      non-pedestrian outbound traffic.
                          ``(B) Extension.--The Secretary may extend for a 
                      single two-year period the date specified in 
                      subparagraph (A) if the Secretary certifies to the 
                      Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs 
                      and the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate and 
                      the Committee on Homeland Security and the Committee on 
                      the Judiciary of the House of Representatives that the 
                      15 land ports of entry that support the highest volume 
                      of passenger vehicles, as determined by available 
                      Federal data, do not have the physical infrastructure 
                      or characteristics to install the systems necessary to 
                      implement a biometric exit data system.
                  ``(3) At air and sea ports of entry.--Not later than five 
              years after the date of the enactment of this section, the 
              Secretary shall expand the biometric exit data system referred 
              to in subsection (a)(2) to all air and sea ports of entry.
                  ``(4) At land ports of entry for pedestrians.--Not later 
              than five years after the date of the enactment of this 
              section, the Secretary shall expand the biometric exit data 
              system referred to in subsection (a)(2) to all land ports of 
              entry, and such system shall apply only in the case of 
              pedestrians.
          ``(c) Effects on Air, Sea, and Land Transportation.--The Secretary, 
      in consultation with appropriate private sector stakeholders, shall 
      ensure that the collection of biometric data under this section causes 
      the least possible disruption to the movement of people or cargo in 
      air, sea, or land transportation, while fulfilling the goals of 
      improving counterterrorism efforts.
          ``(d) Termination of Proceeding.--Notwithstanding any other 
      provision of law, the Secretary shall, on the date of the enactment of 
      this section, terminate the proceeding entitled `Collection of Alien 
      Biometric Data Upon Exit From the United States at Air and Sea Ports of 
      Departure; United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator 
      Technology Program (``US-VISIT'')', issued on April 24, 2008 (73 Fed. 
      Reg. 22065).
          ``(e) Data-Matching.--The biometric exit data system established 
      under this section shall--
                  ``(1) match biometric information for an alien who is 
              departing the United States against the biometric information 
              obtained from the alien upon entry to the United States;
                  ``(2) leverage the infrastructure and databases of the 
              current biometric entry and exit system established pursuant to 
              section 7208 of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism 
              Prevention Act of 2004 (8 U.S.C. 1365b) for the purpose 
              described in paragraph (1); and
                  ``(3) be interoperable with, and allow matching against, 
              other Federal databases that store biometrics of known or 
              suspected terrorists.
          ``(f) Scope.--
                  ``(1) In general.--The biometric exit data system 
              established under this section shall include a requirement for 
              the collection of biometric exit data at the time of departure 
              for all categories of individuals who are required by the 
              Secretary to provide biometric entry data.
                  ``(2) Exception for certain other individuals.--This 
              section shall not apply in the case of an individual who exits 
              and then enters the United States on a passenger vessel (as 
              such term is defined in section 2101 of title 46, United States 
              Code) the itinerary of which originates and terminates in the 
              United States.
                  ``(3) Exception for land ports of entry.--This section 
              shall not apply in the case of a United States or Canadian 
              citizen who exits the United States through a land port of 
              entry.
          ``(g) Collection of Data.--The Secretary may not require any non-
      Federal person to collect biometric data pursuant to the biometric exit 
      data system established under this section, except through a 
      contractual agreement.
          ``(h) Multi-Modal Collection.--In carrying out subsections (a)(1) 
      and (b), the Secretary shall make every effort to collect biometric 
      data using multiple modes of biometrics.
          ``(i) Facilities.--All nonfederally owned facilities at which the 
      biometric exit data system established under this section is 
      implemented shall provide, maintain, and equip space for Federal use 
      that is adequate to support biometric data collection and other 
      inspection-related activity. Such space shall be provided, maintained, 
      and equipped at no cost to the Government.
          ``(j) Northern Land Border.--In the case of the northern land 
      border, the requirements under subsections (a)(2)(C), (b)(2)(A), and 
      (b)(4) may be achieved through the sharing of biometric data provided 
      to U.S. Customs and Border Protection by the Canadian Border Services 
      Agency pursuant to the 2011 Beyond the Border agreement.
          ``(k) Congressional Review.--Not later than 90 days after the date 
      of the enactment of this section, the Secretary shall submit to the 
      Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of the Senate, 
      the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate, the Committee on Homeland 
      Security of the House of Representatives, and the Committee on the 
      Judiciary of the House of Representatives reports and recommendations 
      regarding the Science and Technology Directorate's Air Entry and Exit 
      Re-Engineering Program of the Department and the U.S. Customs and 
      Border Protection entry and exit mobility program demonstrations.''.
      
      SEC. 206. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON COOPERATION BETWEEN AGENCIES.
      
          (a) Finding.--Congress finds that personnel constraints exist at 
      land ports of entry with regard to sanitary and phytosanitary 
      inspections for exported goods.
          (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that, in the 
      best interest of cross-border trade and the agricultural community--
                  (1) any lack of certified personnel for inspection purposes 
              at ports of entry should be addressed by seeking cooperation 
              between agencies and departments of the United States, whether 
              in the form of a memorandum of understanding or through a 
              certification process, whereby additional existing agents are 
              authorized for additional hours to facilitate the crossing and 
              trade of perishable goods in a manner consistent with rules of 
              the Department of Agriculture; and
                  (2) cross designation should be available for personnel who 
              will assist more than one agency or department at land ports of 
              entry to facilitate increased trade and commerce.
      
      SEC. 207. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.
      
          In addition to any amounts otherwise authorized to be appropriated 
      for such purpose, there is authorized to be appropriated $1,000,000,000 
      for each of fiscal years 2018 through 2021 to carry out this title, of 
      which $2,000,000 shall be used by the Secretary for hiring additional 
      Uniform Management Center support personnel, purchasing uniforms for 
      CBP officers and agents, acquiring additional motor vehicles to support 
      vehicle mounted surveillance systems, hiring additional motor vehicle 
      program support personnel, and for contract support for customer 
      service, vendor management, and operations management.


      SEC. 208. EFFECTIVE DATE
      The bill shall go into effect at the beginning of the next FY.

       

       

       

       

      Plain English Summary: - Provides access to technologies necessary for border security including but not limited to: cameras, drones, towers, fences, sensors, vehicles, radar.
      - Provides funding to border patrol.
      - Must respect treaty agreements with Native American Tribes.
      - From FY 2018 to FY 2021, Congress is authorized to appropriate $1,000,000,000 to carry out the provisions under the Act.
      Appropriation
      - In addition to any amounts otherwise authorized to be appropriated
      for such purpose, there is authorized to be appropriated $1,000,000,000
      for each of fiscal years 2018 through 2021 to carry out this title, of
      which $2,000,000 shall be used by the Secretary for hiring additional
      Uniform Management Center support personnel, purchasing uniforms for
      CBP officers and agents, acquiring additional motor vehicles to support
      vehicle mounted surveillance systems, hiring additional motor vehicle
      program support personnel, and for contract support for customer
      service, vendor management, and operations management.
      • 1 comment
      • 35 views
    20. Federal Court Jurisdiction Act

      Senator: Mr. de la Cruz Terms & Definitions:

      SEC. 1 SHORT TITLE

      This Act may be cited as the “Federal Court Jurisdiction Act”.

      Findings:

      SEC. 2 FINDINGS AND DECLARATION OF POLICY

      a. The Congress finds that certain issues controversial in the public discourse have often been litigated in the federal courts, either through initial complaints in the federal district courts, or through the exercise of the appellate jurisdiction of the Supreme Court of the United States; that while not wishing to cast aspersions on the difficult work of the judicial branch of the United States, their decisions, while made in good faith, have resulted in consequences inadvertently unduly contentious in national life with regard to particular issues.

      b. It is hereby declared to be in the policy of this Act to ensure, through the exercise of the Congress’ power to regulate the original jurisdiction of lower federal courts and the appellate jurisdiction of the Supreme Court of the United States, that certain issues be fundamentally decided by the courts and laws of the several states, without the counterproductive interference of the Federal Courts.

      Law Change:

      SEC. 3 PROVISIONS WITH RESPECT TO THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES

      a. The Supreme Court shall, regardless of the provisions of 28 U.S.C. 1257 or of 28 U.S.C. 1254, not review by writ of certiorari or by certification any final judgment or decree rendered by the highest court of a State where the validity of any statute or constitution of a State governing the definition of marriage as between one man and one woman is drawn in question on the ground of its being contrary to the Constitution, treaties or laws of the United States, or where any title, right, privilege or immunity regarding the marriage of two persons of the same sex is specially set up or claimed under the Constitution or the treaties or the statutes of the United States.

      b. The Supreme Court shall, regardless of the provisions of 28 U.S.C. 1257 or of 28 U.S.C. 1254, not review by writ of certiorari or by certification any final judgment or decree rendered by the highest court of a State or where the validity of any statute or constitution of a State regulating the provision of the termination of any pregnancy is drawn in question on the ground of its being contrary to the Constitution, treaties or laws of the United States, or where any title, right, privilege or immunity regarding the termination of any pregnancy is specially set up or claimed under the Constitution or the treaties or the statutes of the United States.

      c. For the purposes of this section, “the highest Court of a State” includes the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, the Supreme Court of the Virgin Islands and the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

       

      SEC. 4 PROVISIONS WITH RESPECT TO THE DISTRICT COURTS

      The following shall be appended to Chapter 85 of 28 U.S.C.:

      ‘ 1370 – Claims concerning same-sex marriages and termination of pregnancy

      a) The district court shall abstain from hearing any civil action for damages, injunction or declaratory relief in which the cause of action:

      i) concerns a claim arising under the Constitution, laws or treaties of the United States, alleging a right to marry another person of the same sex, or

      ii) concerns a claim arising under the Constitution, laws or treaties of the United States, alleging a right to terminate any pregnancy.

      b) If a civil action shall include multiple claims, one or more of which shall be prohibited by this section, and at least one claim that shall not be so prohibited, the district court shall not be required to abstain on hearing any claims not restricted by this section, provided that it is otherwise permissible under any other laws of the United States, or the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.’

      c) For the purpose of this section, the term “district court” shall apply to any court of first instance arising under the laws of the United States, but shall not apply to the Supreme Court of the United States exercising original jurisdiction.’

       

      SEC. 5 RESTRICTION OF SCOPE

      This Act shall not be construed as to deprive the jurisdiction of any federal court to decide, subject to this Act, if it possesses the jurisdiction to hear any claim brought before it.

       

      SEC. 6 EFFECTIVE DATE

      This Act shall come into effect on the twenty-eighth day of December following constitutional passage.

      Plain English Summary: Restricts the appellate jurisdiction of the Supreme Court and the jurisdiction of the federal district courts to hear same-sex marriage or abortion cases.
      • 4 comments
      • 41 views
    21. Victims Protection Act

      Senator: Mr. Ward Terms & Definitions:

      Sexual assault- Sexual assault is an act in which a person sexually touches another person without that person's consent, or coerces or physically forces a person to engage in a sexual actagainst their will. This includes rape, child sexual assault, and torture of a sexual nature. 

      Statue of limitations- the maximum time after an event within which legal proceedings may be initiated.

      Mandatory minimum-requires that offenders serve a predefined term for certain crimes, commonly serious and violent offenses. Judges are bound by law; these sentences are produced through the legislature, not the judicial system.

       

      Law Change:

      An Act of Congress

      1. Be it enacted that the statue of limitations for sexual assault be increased nationwide  to no less than thirty (30) years from when the victim reaches majority or from when the crime occurred, whichever is longer. This supersedes state law and is not impacted from time of police filing. 

      2. That the mandatory minimum sentence for sexual assault as defined in this law be set to 10 years per charge, without the possibility of parole or early release. 

      3. That bond be set at a minimum of $300,000 per the judges discretion

      4. Failure on law enforcement to investigate allegation of sexual assault to the highest extent will be punishable by loss of public funds, jobs, or criminal prosecution. This includes failure to process DNA from “rape kits”

      5. Requires all clergy to be mandatory reporters. Failure to report such allegations to law enforcement will be punishable by no less than 90 days in prison.

       

       

      • 0 comments
      • 27 views
    22. Victims Protection Act

      Senator: Mr. Ward Terms & Definitions:

      Sexual assault- Sexual assault is an act in which a person sexually touches another person without that person's consent, or coerces or physically forces a person to engage in a sexual actagainst their will. This includes rape, child sexual assault, and torture of a sexual nature. 

      Statue of limitations- the maximum time after an event within which legal proceedings may be initiated.

      Mandatory minimum-requires that offenders serve a predefined term for certain crimes, commonly serious and violent offenses. Judges are bound by law; these sentences are produced through the legislature, not the judicial system.

       

      Law Change:

      An Act of Congress

      1. Be it enacted that the statue of limitations for sexual assault be increased nationwide  to no less than thirty (30) years from when the victim reaches majority or from when the crime occurred, whichever is longer. This supersedes state law and is not impacted from time of police filing. 

      2. That the mandatory minimum sentence for sexual assault as defined in this law be set to 10 years per charge, without the possibility of parole or early release. 

      3. That bond be set at a minimum of $300,000 per the judges discretion

      4. Failure on law enforcement to investigate allegation of sexual assault to the highest extent will be punishable by loss of public funds, jobs, or criminal prosecution. This includes failure to process DNA from “rape kits”

      5. Requires all clergy to be mandatory reporters. Failure to report such allegations to law enforcement will be punishable by no less than 90 days in prison.

       

       

      • 1 comment
      • 29 views
    23. H.R. 39 - Second Amendment For Every Registrable Voter Act

      Senator: Mr Jim Jordan Cosponsors: Rep Phillip Huffins, Rep Ross McDaniel Law Change:
      1.  In General.—Section 922(b)(1) of title 18, United States Code, is amended by striking “, and, if the firearm, or ammunition is other than a shotgun or rifle, or ammunition for a shotgun or rifle, to any individual who the licensee knows or has reasonable cause to believe is less than twenty-one years of age”.
      2. Conforming Amendment.—Section 922(c)(1) of such title is amended by striking “, in the case of any firearm other than a shotgun or a rifle, I am twenty-one years or more of age, or that, in the case of a shotgun or a rifle,”.

       

      • 8 comments
      • 56 views
    24. The Expansion of Freight Trailers Act

      Senator: Mr. Ward and Mr. Hong RL Author: Findings taken from http://investors.fedex.com/news-and-events/investor-news/news-release-details/2014/FedEx-Supports-the-33-Foot-Trailer-Legislative-Initiative/default.aspx Terms & Definitions:

      Frieght: less than truck load shipments. Usually palletized or crated

      Carrier: companies operating in Less Than Truckload shipments

      Trailer: shipping vessel for LTL shipments

      Findings:

      While not increasing the maximum permitted weight, provision would result in 16% more cubic capacity in each set of doubles.  The primary users of doubles are package companies and less-than-truckload companies.  Since these operators typically fill the trailers with freight that weighs significantly less than the 80,000 lb. maximum, they will be able to utilize fully the additional cubic capacity.  This will reduce the number of truck trips accordingly, with a commensurate reduction in pavement wear.  Because the double 33's spread the weight of the truck out, there should be a positive impact on some bridges.

      The American Trucking Association estimates that trucks will haul 30% more freight in just ten years.  The increased cubic capacity of double 33's will reduce the number of additional trucks on our roads required to carry this substantial increase in freight.

      Emissions Reduced

      16% more cubic capacity means an equivalent reduction in overall fuel burned by doubles and the related emissions.

      International Competition and Productivity

      Other nations, such as Canada, allow for longer truck combinations that in turn allow them to be more productive.  In order for the U. S. to remain competitive, we need to be on a level playing field.

      Additionally, the increased productivity of double 33's will reduce the cost of freight transportation.  Trucking is an intensely competitive business, which means shippers and ultimately consumers benefit from improved productivity.

      Supporters

      American Trucking Association, National Association of Manufacturers, NIT League, FedEx, UPS, AAA Cooper Transportation, ABF Freight System, Inc. (ABF), Con-Way Inc., Estes Express Lines, Volvo Trucks North America and YRC Worldwide.

      Law Change:

      I. The following maximum length of a double pulled trailer for shippers of less than truckload shipping is hereby extended from 28ft to 33ft nationwide

      II. Section 1 is allowed so long as the current maximum weight of 80,000 lbs is not exceeded

      III. Current exceptions and fines as dictated by each state for overweight shipping is maintained to each states laws as written.

       

      • 2 comments
      • 59 views
    25. Minimum Wage Fairness Act

      Senator: Mike Solin RL Author: Senator Tom Harkin D-IA Terms & Definitions:

      A BILL

      To steadily increase the federal minimum wage in the United States.

      Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

      SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

      This Act may be cited as the “Minimum Wage Fairness Act" or the “MWFA”

      Findings:
      • An increase in the minimum wage raises the standard of living for impoverished workers.
      • The minimum wage hasn't kept up with inflation. As a result, the pay of many workers, particularly those with families of three or more people, are now well below the poverty level.
      • Studies show graduated increases in the minimum wage have a low impact on unemployment.
      • Additional income would be spent by consumers and would ripple through the economy if overall budgets for salary grew under a gradual increase in the minimum wage scenario.
      • Increasing the minimum wage could help reduce gender- and race-based income inequality.
      • Government expenses for social programs aimed at the poor would potentially be reduced. This might result in slightly lower taxes for other Americans.
      • Slightly more revenue for the government would be generated from payroll taxes for social security.
      • -The current Federal minimum wage is $7.25
      • More money in the hands of working class people stimulates the economy

       

      Law Change:

      Minimum Wage Fairness Act - Amends the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA) to increase the federal minimum wage for employees to: (1) $8.20 an hour beginning on the first day of the sixth month after the enactment of this Act, (2) $9.15 an hour beginning one year after the date of such initial increase, (3) $10.10 an hour beginning two years after such date, and (4) the amount determined by the Secretary of Labor (based on increases in the Consumer Price Index) beginning three years after such date and annually thereafter.

      Increases the federal minimum wage for tipped employees to $3.00 an hour for one year beginning on the first day of the sixth month after the enactment of this Act. Provides a formula for subsequent annual adjustments of the minimum wage for tipped employees until it equals 70% of the wage in effect under FLSA for other employees.

      Directs the Secretary of Labor, 60 days before any increase in the minimum wage, to publish it in the Federal Register and on the Department of Labor's website.

      Amends the Internal Revenue Code to extend through taxable years beginning before 2017: (1) the increase to $500,000 of the expensing allowance for business assets, including computer software; and (2) the treatment of qualified real property (i.e., leasehold improvement property, restaurant property, and retail improvement property) as depreciable business property.

      • 4 comments
      • 79 views
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