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  1. Past hour
  2. Jsawrie

    ALERT Act

    Debate begins for 72 hours *bangs gavel*
  3. Jsawrie

    Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act

    The motion carries Total Aye 338 Nay 97 Present 0 *gavel bangs*
  4. Jsawrie

    Final Vote on AUMF

    The motion carries Total Aye 338 Nay 97 Present 0 *gavel bangs*
  5. The motion carries Total Aye 338 Nay 97 Present 0 *gavel bangs*
  6. ILDem

    Hybrid Cars Act

    CS
  7. Today
  8. ILDem

    Close the Revolving Door Act

    CS
  9. ILDem

    ALERT Act

    CS
  10. Michael

    H 1-13. Naturalization Act of 1789

    Mr Speaker, I second the amendment from my colleague from North Carolina. I yield
  11. Wm96

    Attorney General Nomination

    Also, similarly, high level financial crimes are extremely underpoliced, such as money laundering, insider trading, or market manipulation. I mean, very few of the culprits of the financial crisis of 2008 were prosecuted, and we knew who they were—James Comey even called them the “chickenshit club.” Do you intend to crack down on this type of crime? If so, how do you intend to do it?
  12. Wm96

    Attorney General Nomination

    Mr. Williams, As I’m sure you know, the US has the highest rate of incarceration in the world, largely believed to be due to the policies my colleague has been asking you about, namely stringent marijuana enforcement and mandatory minimums. Since you have come out in favor of these two policies, what do you believe the cause of high rates of incarceration are, and what do you intend to do to lower that rate?
  13. Wm96

    Mark Rambor Holds Town Hall in Austin

    Thank you for your question. I will absolutely not be running for President in 2020. The people of Texas elected me to represent them in the Senate for six years, and that’s what I intend to do.
  14. Conrad

    Attorney General Nomination

    1) The cost for doing the crime is a lot higher compared to actually following the law, leads to decreases in all types of crime. 2) I can't really comment on past cases or future cases for that matter but a Justice Department led by me will enforce the law fairly. 3) I can't tell a judge what to do, Senator. But I do believe there is a safety valve to catch those who are first time non-violent offenders, which I believe works well for those who are genuinely sorry for what they did. In this specific case you refer to, I'm not sure of the circumstances surrounding this woman's case or how severe, or indeed her prior convictions.
  15. Batman

    Attorney General Nomination

    Well, sir first I do have a couple questions, 1) Could you elaborate on what you mean by serious crime being brought down? 2) Also, what would you say to those who believe that they unfairly target minorities as minorities as more likely to go to prison then Caucasians? 3) There is also the question of whether or not these laws are just in one case there was a trial involving a mother of 4 was once paid USD100 to mail an unknown package to someone that contained hundreds of grams of crack cocaine, and the judge sentenced her to 10 years in prison, as the law dictated what had to be done even though the judge felt it unjust and irrational. Would you allow Judges to hand down decisions below the mandatory minimum in cases in which they deemed the mandatory minimum to be unjust and/or irrational? (OOC: https://connectusfund.org/9-primary-pros-and-cons-of-mandatory-minimum-sentences for the case)
  16. Conrad

    Attorney General Nomination

    I think mandatory minimums have resulted in a reduction of serious crime because we have a system of harsh punishments here in the United States compared to other countries around the world. Keeping them in place would mean that a lot of the work that communities across the United States have done to keep them safe would be preserved. Is there anything specific you'd like to ask on them?
  17. Batman

    Attorney General Nomination

    Very well, moving right along then what is your view of mandatory minimums, in general, do you believe them to be a helpful form of deterrence or not?
  18. Conrad

    Attorney General Nomination

    I will enforce the laws passed by Congress.
  19. James Grant

    Mark Rambor Holds Town Hall in Austin

    Mr. Rambor, Will you be running for President in 2020?
  20. TexAgRepublican

    Miner Protection Act

    Signed, /s/ Kyle Fitzgerald President of the United States
  21. TexAgRepublican

    Small and Rural Community Clean Water Technical Assistance Act

    Signed, /s/ Kyle Fitzgerald President of the United States
  22. TexAgRepublican

    FARMS Act

    Signed, /s/ Kyle Fitzgerald President of the United States
  23. Wm96

    Mark Rambor Holds Town Hall in Austin

    Hello, and thank you for your question. I don’t know that I would say I ran on a “liberal” agenda, as I am definitely not a rubber-stamp or partisan firebrand. I mean, I support southern heritage, carry at all times, and believe in supporting our veterans at every turn, but yes, I am definitely more moderate and less conservative than my friend Mr. Bennett. I believe Mr. Bennett to be a man of conviction, and I like to believe I am also a man of conviction myself. I did not “run on a platform,” as many say—I ran on what I believe in, as I believe Mr. Bennett did. The only way I can explain our differences is that we are different people, and different people have different beliefs, so if everyone is to be authentic, there are going to be varying viewpoints. The great thing about the Democratic Party is that we are all able to stand up for what we believe, as long as we have the people’s best interest at heart. Also, for the record, I do not believe Mr. Bennett is a “pseudo conservative.” He is a right-leaning Democrat with Democratic values that I respect. I hope that answers your question. Thank you again.
  24. Batman

    Attorney General Nomination

    So you have no stance on the legalization of marijuana? @Conrad
  25. James Grant

    Fair Trade Act

    Mr. Wilson, with thanks to Mr. Swanner and Mr. Levin, submits A BILL To amend title VII of the Tariff Act of 1930 to clarify that countervailing duties may be imposed to address subsidies relating to a fundamentally undervalued currency of any foreign country. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Fair Trade Act”. SEC. 2. CLARIFICATION REGARDING DEFINITION OF COUNTERVAILABLE SUBSIDY. (a) Benefit Conferred.—Section 771(5)(E) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1677(5)(E)) is amended— (1) in clause (iii), by striking “and” at the end; (2) in clause (iv), by striking the period at the end and inserting “, and”; and (3) by inserting after clause (iv) the following new clause: “(v) in the case in which the currency of a country in which the subject merchandise is produced is exchanged for foreign currency obtained from export transactions, and the currency of such country is a fundamentally undervalued currency, as defined in paragraph (37), the difference between the amount of the currency of such country provided and the amount of the currency of such country that would have been provided if the real effective exchange rate of the currency of such country were not undervalued, as determined pursuant to paragraph (38).”. (b) Export Subsidy.—Section 771(5A)(B) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1677(5A)(B)) is amended by adding at the end the following new sentence: “In the case of a subsidy relating to a fundamentally undervalued currency, the fact that the subsidy may also be provided in circumstances not involving export shall not, for that reason alone, mean that the subsidy cannot be considered contingent upon export performance.”. (c) Definition Of Fundamentally Undervalued Currency.—Section 771 of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1677) is amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph: “(37) FUNDAMENTALLY UNDERVALUED CURRENCY.—The administering authority shall determine that the currency of a country in which the subject merchandise is produced is a ‘fundamentally undervalued currency’ if— “(A) the government of the country (including any public entity within the territory of the country) engages in protracted, large-scale intervention in one or more foreign exchange markets during part or all of the 18-month period that represents the most recent 18 months for which the information required under paragraph (38) is reasonably available, but that does not include any period of time later than the final month in the period of investigation or the period of review, as applicable; “(B) the real effective exchange rate of the currency is undervalued by at least 5 percent, on average and as calculated under paragraph (38), relative to the equilibrium real effective exchange rate for the country’s currency during the 18-month period; “(C) during the 18-month period, the country has experienced significant and persistent global current account surpluses; and “(D) during the 18-month period, the foreign asset reserves held by the government of the country exceed— “(i) the amount necessary to repay all debt obligations of the government falling due within the coming 12 months; “(ii) 20 percent of the country’s money supply, using standard measures of M2; and “(iii) the value of the country’s imports during the previous 4 months.”. (d) Definition Of Real Effective Exchange Rate Undervaluation.—Section 771 of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1677), as amended by subsection (c) of this section, is further amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph: “(38) REAL EFFECTIVE EXCHANGE RATE UNDERVALUATION.—The calculation of real effective exchange rate undervaluation, for purposes of paragraph (5)(E)(v) and paragraph (37), shall— “(A) (i) rely upon, and where appropriate be the simple average of, the results yielded from application of the approaches described in the guidelines of the International Monetary Fund’s Consultative Group on Exchange Rate Issues; or “(ii) if the guidelines of the International Monetary Fund’s Consultative Group on Exchange Rate Issues are not available, be based on generally accepted economic and econometric techniques and methodologies to measure the level of undervaluation; “(B) rely upon data that are publicly available, reliable, and compiled and maintained by the International Monetary Fund or, if the International Monetary Fund cannot provide the data, by other international organizations or by national governments; and “(C) use inflation-adjusted, trade-weighted exchange rates.”. SEC. 3. REPORT ON IMPLEMENTATION OF ACT. (a) In General.—Not later than 9 months after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to Congress a report on the implementation of the amendments made by this Act. (b) Matters To Be Included.—The report required by subsection (a) shall include a description of the extent to which United States industries that have been materially injured by reason of imports of subject merchandise produced in foreign countries with fundamentally undervalued currencies have received relief under title VII of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1671 et seq.), as amended by this Act. SEC. 4. APPLICATION TO GOODS FROM CANADA AND MEXICO. Pursuant to article 1902 of the North American Free Trade Agreement and section 408 of the North American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act of 1993 (19 U.S.C. 3438), the amendments made by section 2 of this Act shall apply to goods from Canada and Mexico. PES: Amends the Tariff Act of 1930 to include as a "countervailable subsidy" requiring action under a countervailing duty or antidumping duty proceeding the benefit conferred on merchandise imported into the United States from foreign countries with fundamentally undervalued currency. Defines "benefit conferred," in cases where the currency of a foreign country is exchanged for foreign currency (i.e., U.S. dollars) obtained from export transactions, as the difference between: (1) the amount of currency provided by a foreign country in which the subject merchandise is produced, and (2) the amount of currency such country would have provided if the real effective exchange rate of its currency were not fundamentally undervalued. Declares that the fact that such a subsidy is also provided in circumstances not involving export shall not, for that reason alone, mean it cannot be considered export contingent and actionable under a countervailing duty and antidumping duty proceeding. Requires the administering authority to determine that the currency of a foreign country is fundamentally undervalued if for an 18-month period: (1) the government of the country engages in protracted, large-scale intervention in one or more foreign exchange markets; (2) the country's real effective exchange rate is undervalued by at least 5%; (3) the country has experienced significant and persistent global current account surpluses; and (4) the country's government has foreign asset reserves exceeding the amount necessary to repay all its debt obligations falling due within the coming 12 months, 20% percent of the country's money supply, and the value of the country's imports during the previous 4 months. Requires the use, for calculating a country's "real effective exchange rate undervaluation," of certain guidelines of the Consultative Group on Exchange Rate Issues of the International Monetary Fund or, if those guidelines are not available, generally accepted economic and econometric techniques and methodologies. Requires the use, also, of inflation-adjusted, trade-weighted exchange rates. Applies the amendments made by this Act to goods from Canada and Mexico.
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