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  1. Past hour
  2. Batman

    Student Non-Discrimination Act

    Mr.Cruz of the Plains - No Mr.Daines of the Plains - No
  3. Conrad

    Student Non-Discrimination Act

    Mr. Tillis - NO Mr. Graham - NO
  4. Wm96

    Student Non-Discrimination Act

    Harris—Yes Cortez-Masto—Yes
  5. Shiggy

    Student Non-Discrimination Act

    Mr. Grassley-NO Mr. Paul- NO
  6. Shiggy

    Student Non-Discrimination Act

    Pence: *The Senate opens*
  7. Conrad

    PAWS Act

    Becomes Public Law 116-1
  8. Shiggy

    PAWS Act

    *SML Grassley* Mr. Speaker, I ask for unanimous consent *VP Pence* without objection?.............. Without hearing any....the bill passes via UC. *GAVEL*
  9. Today
  10. TexAgRepublican

    @jackswanner

    I'm in!
  11. Conrad

    @apnewswire

    @apnewswire Sources close to the treasury say that a continuing resolution will be necessary to avoid a government shutdown as budget negotiations hit wall
  12. Conrad

    The Hill

    MUELLER SAFE SAYS LINDSEY GRAHAM (R-SC) Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker has reportedly assured Senator Lindsey Graham, a senior member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, that the Mueller probe into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election is safe. Graham met with Whitaker in his Russell Building office and says the man President Trump tapped to replace ousted Attorney General Jeff Sessions says he doesn’t see anything wrong with Mueller’s probe. Graham said that Whitaker assured him that he doesn’t think that Mueller’s probe has breached any Justice Department guidelines.
  13. Robert Cardley Hello! It's a great pleasure to be here in Springfield, Illinois. One of the crucial, integral things I want to get done if I am elected governor is make the Midwest more business-friendly. For too long the Midwest has been unfriendly to businesses, with high taxes on corporations and burdensome regulations. My objective is to lower business taxes and lower regulation on businesses, which will help enormously. Much of the Midwest is ranked near the bottom on "Most Friendly to Business" polls and nowhere near the top. This needs to change. As we stand there is too much regulation on businesses and too many taxes on businesses. This has to change, and under my governorship businesses will be allowed to thrive. View full PR
  14. Hello! It's a great pleasure to be here in Springfield, Illinois. One of the crucial, integral things I want to get done if I am elected governor is make the Midwest more business-friendly. For too long the Midwest has been unfriendly to businesses, with high taxes on corporations and burdensome regulations. My objective is to lower business taxes and lower regulation on businesses, which will help enormously. Much of the Midwest is ranked near the bottom on "Most Friendly to Business" polls and nowhere near the top. This needs to change. As we stand there is too much regulation on businesses and too many taxes on businesses. This has to change, and under my governorship businesses will be allowed to thrive.
  15. MorbidMoses

    Don Moses

    Don Moses was born and raised in Warner Robins, Georgia. He rose to local celebrity fame by hosting one of the highest rated conservative talk shows in recent history in the state of Georgia. Moses graduated with a bachelor's degree from Morehouse College with a double major in broadcast journalism and political science. He went to pursue his master's degree from Spelman College in Atlanta, and later received his doctoral degree from Harvard. It was at Harvard where he would meet the love of his life, Angela. They would get married, and have 2 daughters, (Reza June Moses and Kaitlyn Rae Moses) and a son (Donald Gordon Moses, Jr.). In 2010, the Moses family would adopt a young boy from Uganda that named Klintu whom they affectionately call Klint.
  16. MorbidMoses

    Don Moses (Republican)

    Character Name: Don Moses Home State: Georgia Previous Job: Media (Actor, Musician, Artist, Journalist, etc) Date of Birth: 09/18/1969 Race / Ethnicity: White Religion: Protestant Christian Wealth: Upper Middle Class Gender: Male Sexuality: Heterosexual Are you married?: Yes How many children do you have?: 4 Don Moses was born and raised in Warner Robins, Georgia. He rose to local celebrity fame by hosting one of the highest rated conservative talk shows in recent history in the state of Georgia. Moses graduated with a bachelor's degree from Morehouse College with a double major in broadcast journalism and political science. He went to pursue his master's degree from Spelman College in Atlanta, and later received his doctoral degree from Harvard. It was at Harvard where he would meet the love of his life, Angela. They would get married, and have 2 daughters, (Reza June Moses and Kaitlyn Rae Moses) and a son (Donald Gordon Moses, Jr.). In 2010, the Moses family would adopt a young boy from Uganda that named Klintu whom they affectionately call Klint. View full character
  17. Bruce

    Mary Blythe-Pinnacle (Democrat)

    I'll post stats tonight, but for now this House character is approved.
  18. Conrad

    Wall Street Journal

    EU COMMISSION OFFICIAL WARNS OF TARIFF RETALIATION An official of the European Commission today has spoke out against an executive order signed by President trump to raise tariffs on EU car imports to the US by 7.5%, to bring them in line with the tariffs imposed by the EU on US car exports. Some car companies such as Mercedes Benz, BMW and Volkswagen have reported some losses on the stockmarket thanks to the signing of the executive order. Cecilia Malmstrom warned that Brussels was “ready” to retaliate against US products in the future. She said such retaliation would cover “a lot of different sectors” and would be “compatible” with global trade rules. A report by the Tax Foundation, a Washington-based economic think-tank, released this week estimated that a 25 per cent tariff on the EU’s $56.3bn in annual exports of cars to the US would lead to more than 31,000 job losses. Given that the tariffs are only 10%, we can expect no where near 31,000 job losses but perhaps around 11,000, maybe less.
  19. Dogslife

    Wealth 1

    For both*
  20. TexAgRepublican

    Employment Non-Discrimination Act

    Ms. Fitzgerald, with thanks to Mr. Merkley, submits A BILL To prohibit employment discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Employment Non-Discrimination Act”. SEC. 2. PURPOSES. The purposes of this Act are— (1) to address the history and persistent, widespread pattern of discrimination on the bases of sexual orientation and gender identity by private sector employers and local, State, and Federal Government employers; (2) to provide an explicit, comprehensive Federal prohibition against employment discrimination on the bases of sexual orientation and gender identity, including meaningful and effective remedies for any such discrimination; (3) to invoke congressional powers, including the powers to enforce the 14th Amendment to the Constitution, and to regulate interstate commerce pursuant to section 8 of article I of the Constitution, in order to prohibit employment discrimination on the bases of sexual orientation and gender identity; and (4) to reinforce the Nation's commitment to fairness and equal opportunity in the workplace consistent with the fundamental right of religious freedom. SEC. 3. DEFINITIONS. (a) In General.—In this Act: (1) COMMISSION.—The term “Commission” means the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. (2) COVERED ENTITY.—The term “covered entity” means an employer, employment agency, labor organization, or joint labor-management committee. (3) DEMONSTRATES.—The term “demonstrates” means meets the burdens of production and persuasion. (4) EMPLOYEE.— (A) IN GENERAL.—The term “employee” means— (i) an employee as defined in section 701(f) of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e(f)); (ii) a State employee to which section 302(a)(1) of the Government Employee Rights Act of 1991 (42 U.S.C. 2000e–16b(a)(1)) applies; (iii) a covered employee, as defined in section 101 of the Congressional Accountability Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1301) or section 411(c) of title 3, United States Code; or (iv) an employee or applicant to which section 717(a) of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e–16(a)) applies. (B) EXCEPTION.—The provisions of this Act that apply to an employee or individual shall not apply to a volunteer who receives no compensation. (5) EMPLOYER.—The term “employer” means— (A) a person engaged in an industry affecting commerce (as defined in section 701(h) of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e(h)) who has 15 or more employees (as defined in subparagraphs (A)(i) and (B) of paragraph (4)) for each working day in each of 20 or more calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year, and any agent of such a person, but does not include a bona fide private membership club (other than a labor organization) that is exempt from taxation under section 501(c) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986; (B) an employing authority to which section 302(a)(1) of the Government Employee Rights Act of 1991 applies; (C) an employing office, as defined in section 101 of the Congressional Accountability Act of 1995 or section 411(c) of title 3, United States Code; or (D) an entity to which section 717(a) of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 applies. (6) EMPLOYMENT AGENCY.—The term “employment agency” has the meaning given the term in section 701(c) of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e(c)). (7) GENDER IDENTITY.—The term “gender identity” means the gender-related identity, appearance, or mannerisms or other gender-related characteristics of an individual, with or without regard to the individual’s designated sex at birth. (8) LABOR ORGANIZATION.—The term “labor organization” has the meaning given the term in section 701(d) of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e(d)). (9) PERSON.—The term “person” has the meaning given the term in section 701(a) of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e(a)). (10) SEXUAL ORIENTATION.—The term “sexual orientation” means homosexuality, heterosexuality, or bisexuality. (11) STATE.—The term “State” has the meaning given the term in section 701(i) of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e(i)). (b) Application Of Definitions.—For purposes of this section, a reference in section 701 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964— (1) to an employee or an employer shall be considered to refer to an employee (as defined in subsection (a)(4)) or an employer (as defined in subsection (a)(5)), respectively, except as provided in paragraph (2) of this subsection; and (2) to an employer in subsection (f) of that section shall be considered to refer to an employer (as defined in subsection (a)(5)(A)). SEC. 4. EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION PROHIBITED. (a) Employer Practices.—It shall be an unlawful employment practice for an employer— (1) to fail or refuse to hire or to discharge any individual, or otherwise discriminate against any individual with respect to the compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of employment of the individual, because of such individual’s actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity; or (2) to limit, segregate, or classify the employees or applicants for employment of the employer in any way that would deprive or tend to deprive any individual of employment or otherwise adversely affect the status of the individual as an employee, because of such individual’s actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity. (b) Employment Agency Practices.—It shall be an unlawful employment practice for an employment agency to fail or refuse to refer for employment, or otherwise to discriminate against, any individual because of the actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity of the individual or to classify or refer for employment any individual on the basis of the actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity of the individual. (c) Labor Organization Practices.—It shall be an unlawful employment practice for a labor organization— (1) to exclude or to expel from its membership, or otherwise to discriminate against, any individual because of the actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity of the individual; (2) to limit, segregate, or classify its membership or applicants for membership, or to classify or fail or refuse to refer for employment any individual, in any way that would deprive or tend to deprive any individual of employment, or would limit such employment or otherwise adversely affect the status of the individual as an employee or as an applicant for employment because of such individual’s actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity; or (3) to cause or attempt to cause an employer to discriminate against an individual in violation of this section. (d) Training Programs.—It shall be an unlawful employment practice for any employer, labor organization, or joint labor-management committee controlling apprenticeship or other training or retraining, including on-the-job training programs, to discriminate against any individual because of the actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity of the individual in admission to, or employment in, any program established to provide apprenticeship or other training. (e) Association.—An unlawful employment practice described in any of subsections (a) through (d) shall be considered to include an action described in that subsection, taken against an individual based on the actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity of a person with whom the individual associates or has associated. (f) No Preferential Treatment Or Quotas.—Nothing in this Act shall be construed or interpreted to require or permit— (1) any covered entity to grant preferential treatment to any individual or to any group because of the actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity of such individual or group on account of an imbalance which may exist with respect to the total number or percentage of persons of any actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity employed by any employer, referred or classified for employment by any employment agency or labor organization, admitted to membership or classified by any labor organization, or admitted to, or employed in, any apprenticeship or other training program, in comparison with the total number or percentage of persons of such actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity in any community, State, section, or other area, or in the available work force in any community, State, section, or other area; or (2) the adoption or implementation by a covered entity of a quota on the basis of actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity. (g) No Disparate Impact Claims.—Only disparate treatment claims may be brought under this Act. (h) Standards Of Proof.—Except as otherwise provided, an unlawful employment practice is established when the complaining party demonstrates that sexual orientation or gender identity was a motivating factor for any employment practice, even though other factors also motivated the practice. SEC. 5. RETALIATION PROHIBITED. It shall be an unlawful employment practice for a covered entity to discriminate against an individual because such individual— (1) opposed any practice made an unlawful employment practice by this Act; or (2) made a charge, testified, assisted, or participated in any manner in an investigation, proceeding, or hearing under this Act. SEC. 6. EXEMPTION FOR RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS. (a) In General.—This Act shall not apply to a corporation, association, educational institution or institution of learning, or society that is exempt from the religious discrimination provisions of title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.) pursuant to section 702(a) or 703(e)(2) of such Act (42 U.S.C. 2000e–1(a), 2000e–2(e)(2)) (referred to in this section as a “religious employer”). (b) Prohibition On Certain Government Actions.—A religious employer's exemption under this section shall not result in any action by a Federal agency, or any State or local agency that receives Federal funding or financial assistance, to penalize or withhold licenses, permits, certifications, accreditation, contracts, grants, guarantees, tax-exempt status, or any benefits or exemptions from that employer, or to prohibit the employer's participation in programs or activities sponsored by that Federal, State, or local agency. Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to invalidate any other Federal, State, or local law (including a regulation) that otherwise applies to a religious employer exempt under this section. SEC. 7. NONAPPLICATION TO MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES; VETERANS’ PREFERENCES. (a) Armed Forces.— (1) EMPLOYMENT.—In this Act, the term “employment” does not apply to the relationship between the United States and members of the Armed Forces. (2) ARMED FORCES.—In paragraph (1) the term “Armed Forces” means the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. (b) Veterans’ Preferences.—This title does not repeal or modify any Federal, State, territorial, or local law creating a special right or preference concerning employment for a veteran. SEC. 8. CONSTRUCTION. (a) Dress Or Grooming Standards.—Nothing in this Act shall prohibit an employer from requiring an employee, during the employee’s hours at work, to adhere to reasonable dress or grooming standards not prohibited by other provisions of Federal, State, or local law, provided that the employer permits any employee who has undergone gender transition prior to the time of employment, and any employee who has notified the employer that the employee has undergone or is undergoing gender transition after the time of employment, to adhere to the same dress or grooming standards as apply for the gender to which the employee has transitioned or is transitioning. (b) Additional Facilities Not Required.—Nothing in this Act shall be construed to require the construction of new or additional facilities. SEC. 9. COLLECTION OF STATISTICS PROHIBITED. The Commission and the Secretary of Labor shall neither compel the collection of nor require the production of statistics on actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity from covered entities pursuant to this Act. SEC. 10. ENFORCEMENT. (a) Enforcement Powers.—With respect to the administration and enforcement of this Act in the case of a claim alleged by an individual for a violation of this Act— (1) the Commission shall have the same powers as the Commission has to administer and enforce— (A) title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.); or (B) sections 302 and 304 of the Government Employee Rights Act of 1991 (42 U.S.C. 2000e–16b and 2000e–16c), in the case of a claim alleged by such individual for a violation of such title, or of section 302(a)(1) of the Government Employee Rights Act of 1991 (42 U.S.C. 2000e–16b(a)(1)), respectively; (2) the Librarian of Congress shall have the same powers as the Librarian of Congress has to administer and enforce title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.) in the case of a claim alleged by such individual for a violation of such title; (3) the Board (as defined in section 101 of the Congressional Accountability Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1301)) shall have the same powers as the Board has to administer and enforce the Congressional Accountability Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1301 et seq.) in the case of a claim alleged by such individual for a violation of section 201(a)(1) of such Act (2 U.S.C. 1311(a)(1)); (4) the Attorney General shall have the same powers as the Attorney General has to administer and enforce— (A) title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.); or (B) sections 302 and 304 of the Government Employee Rights Act of 1991 (42 U.S.C. 2000e–16b and 2000e–16c); in the case of a claim alleged by such individual for a violation of such title, or of section 302(a)(1) of the Government Employee Rights Act of 1991 (42 U.S.C. 2000e–16b(a)(1)), respectively; (5) the President, the Commission, and the Merit Systems Protection Board shall have the same powers as the President, the Commission, and the Board, respectively, have to administer and enforce chapter 5 of title 3, United States Code, in the case of a claim alleged by such individual for a violation of section 411 of such title; and (6) a court of the United States shall have the same jurisdiction and powers as the court has to enforce— (A) title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.) in the case of a claim alleged by such individual for a violation of such title; (B) sections 302 and 304 of the Government Employee Rights Act of 1991 (42 U.S.C. 2000e–16b and 2000e–16c) in the case of a claim alleged by such individual for a violation of section 302(a)(1) of such Act (42 U.S.C. 2000e–16b(a)(1)); (C) the Congressional Accountability Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1301 et seq.) in the case of a claim alleged by such individual for a violation of section 201(a)(1) of such Act (2 U.S.C. 1311(a)(1)); and (D) chapter 5 of title 3, United States Code, in the case of a claim alleged by such individual for a violation of section 411 of such title. (b) Procedures And Remedies.—Except as provided in section 4(g), the procedures and remedies applicable to a claim alleged by an individual for a violation of this Act are— (1) the procedures and remedies applicable for a violation of title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.) in the case of a claim alleged by such individual for a violation of such title; (2) the procedures and remedies applicable for a violation of section 302(a)(1) of the Government Employee Rights Act of 1991 (42 U.S.C. 2000e–16b(a)(1)) in the case of a claim alleged by such individual for a violation of such section; (3) the procedures and remedies applicable for a violation of section 201(a)(1) of the Congressional Accountability Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1311(a)(1)) in the case of a claim alleged by such individual for a violation of such section; and (4) the procedures and remedies applicable for a violation of section 411 of title 3, United States Code, in the case of a claim alleged by such individual for a violation of such section. (c) Other Applicable Provisions.—With respect to a claim alleged by a covered employee (as defined in section 101 of the Congressional Accountability Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1301)) for a violation of this Act, title III of the Congressional Accountability Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1381 et seq.) shall apply in the same manner as such title applies with respect to a claim alleged by such a covered employee for a violation of section 201(a)(1) of such Act (2 U.S.C. 1311(a)(1)). (d) No Double Recovery.—An individual who files claims alleging that a practice is an unlawful employment practice under this Act and an unlawful employment practice because of sex under title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.) shall not be permitted to recover damages for such practice under both of— (1) this Act; and (2) section 1977A of the Revised Statutes (42 U.S.C. 1981a) and title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. (e) Motivating Factor Decisions.—On a claim in which an individual proved a violation under section 4(h) and a respondent demonstrates that the respondent would have taken the same action in the absence of the impermissible motivating factor, the court— (1) may grant declaratory relief, injunctive relief (except as provided in paragraph (2)), and attorney's fees and costs demonstrated to be directly attributable only to the pursuit of a claim under section 4(h); and (2) shall not award damages or issue an order requiring any admission, reinstatement, hiring, promotion, or payment. SEC. 11. STATE AND FEDERAL IMMUNITY. (a) Abrogation Of State Immunity.—A State shall not be immune under the 11th Amendment to the Constitution from a suit brought in a Federal court of competent jurisdiction for a violation of this Act. (b) Waiver Of State Immunity.— (1) IN GENERAL.— (A) WAIVER.—A State’s receipt or use of Federal financial assistance for any program or activity of a State shall constitute a waiver of sovereign immunity, under the 11th Amendment to the Constitution or otherwise, to a suit brought by an employee or applicant for employment of that program or activity under this Act for a remedy authorized under subsection (d). (B) DEFINITION.—In this paragraph, the term “program or activity” has the meaning given the term in section 606 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000d–4a). (2) EFFECTIVE DATE.—With respect to a particular program or activity, paragraph (1) applies to conduct occurring on or after the day, after the date of enactment of this Act, on which a State first receives or uses Federal financial assistance for that program or activity. (c) Remedies Against State Officials.—An official of a State may be sued in the official capacity of the official by any employee or applicant for employment who has complied with the applicable procedures of section 10, for equitable relief that is authorized under this Act. In such a suit the court may award to the prevailing party those costs authorized by section 722 of the Revised Statutes (42 U.S.C. 1988). (d) Remedies Against The United States And The States.—Notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, in an action or administrative proceeding against the United States or a State for a violation of this Act, remedies (including remedies at law and in equity, and interest) are available for the violation to the same extent as the remedies are available for a violation of title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.) by a private entity, except that— (1) punitive damages are not available; and (2) compensatory damages are available to the extent specified in section 1977A(b) of the Revised Statutes (42 U.S.C. 1981a(b)). SEC. 12. ATTORNEYS’ FEES. (a) Definition.—For purposes of this section, the term “decisionmaker” means an entity described in section 10(a) (other than paragraph (4) of such section), acting in the discretion of the entity. (b) Authority.—Notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, in an action or administrative proceeding for a violation of this Act, a decisionmaker may allow the prevailing party, other than the Commission or the United States, a reasonable attorney’s fee (including expert fees) as part of the costs, to the same extent as is permitted under title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e et seq.), sections 302 and 304 of the Government Employee Rights Act of 1991 (42 U.S.C. 2000e–16b and 2000e–16c), the Congressional Accountability Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1301 et seq.), or chapter 5 of title 3, United States Code, whichever applies to the prevailing party in that action or proceeding. The Commission and the United States shall be liable for the costs to the same extent as a private person. SEC. 13. POSTING NOTICES. A covered entity who is required to post a notice described in section 711 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000e–10) may be required to post an amended notice, including a description of the applicable provisions of this Act, in the manner prescribed by, and subject to the penalty provided under, section 711 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Nothing in this Act shall be construed to require a separate notice to be posted. SEC. 14. REGULATIONS. (a) In General.—Except as provided in subsections (b), (c), and (d), the Commission shall have authority to issue regulations to carry out this Act. (b) Librarian Of Congress.—The Librarian of Congress shall have authority to issue regulations to carry out this Act with respect to employees and applicants for employment of the Library of Congress. (c) Board.—The Board referred to in section 10(a)(3) shall have authority to issue regulations to carry out this Act, in accordance with section 304 of the Congressional Accountability Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1384), with respect to covered employees, as defined in section 101 of such Act (2 U.S.C. 1301). (d) President.—The President shall have authority to issue regulations to carry out this Act with respect to covered employees, as defined in section 411(c) of title 3, United States Code, and applicants for employment as such employees. SEC. 15. RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER LAWS. This Act shall not invalidate or limit the rights, remedies, or procedures available to an individual claiming discrimination prohibited under any other Federal law or regulation or any law or regulation of a State or political subdivision of a State. SEC. 16. SEVERABILITY. If any provision of this Act, or the application of the provision to any person or circumstance, is held to be invalid, the remainder of this Act and the application of the provision to any other person or circumstances shall not be affected by the invalidity. SEC. 17. EFFECTIVE DATE. This Act shall take effect on the date that is 6 months after the date of enactment of this Act and shall not apply to conduct occurring before the effective date. PES: (Sec. 4) Prohibits covered entities (employers, employment agencies, labor organizations, or joint labor-management committees) from engaging in employment discrimination on the basis of an individual's actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity. Declares that it shall be unlawful for an employer, because of an individual's actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity, to: (1) fail or refuse to hire, to discharge, or to otherwise discriminate with respect to the compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of employment of such individual; or (2) limit, segregate, or classify employees or applicants in any way that would deprive any individual of employment or adversely affect an individual's status as an employee. Prohibits employment agencies, labor organizations, and training programs from engaging in similar practices that would adversely affect individuals based on such actual or perceived orientation or identity. Specifies that such unlawful employment practices include actions based on the actual or perceived orientation or identity of a person with whom the individual associates. Prohibits certain employment actions from being considered unlawful with respect to volunteers who receive no compensation. Prohibits a covered entity from granting preferential treatment or implementing quotas on the basis of such actual or perceived orientation or identity. Limits the claims authorized to be brought under this Act to disparate treatment claims (thereby specifying that disparate impact claims are not provided for under this Act). Places the burden of proof on the complaining party to establish such an unlawful employment practice by demonstrating that sexual orientation or gender identity was a motivating factor for any employment practice, even though other factors also motivated the practice. (Sec. 5) Prohibits a covered entity from discriminating against an individual who: (1) opposed such an unlawful employment practice; or (2) made a charge, testified, assisted, or participated in an investigation, proceeding, or hearing under this Act. (Sec. 6) Makes this Act inapplicable to corporations, associations, educational institutions or institutions of learning, or societies exempt from the religious discrimination provisions of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (thereby establishing a religious employer's exemption). Prohibits a federal agency, or any state or local agency that receives federal funding or financial assistance, from: (1) penalizing or withholding licenses, permits, certifications, accreditation, contracts, grants, guarantees, tax-exempt status, or any benefits or exemptions from an exempt religious employer; or (2) prohibiting a religious employer from participating in programs or activities sponsored by such agency. Prohibits the religious employer's exemption and related requirements from invalidating any other federal, state, or local law or regulation that otherwise applies to a religious employer. (Sec. 7) Makes this Act inapplicable to the relationship between the United States and members of the Armed Forces. Declares that this Act does not repeal or modify any federal, state, territorial, or local law creating a special right or preference concerning employment for a veteran. (Sec. 😎 Prohibits this Act from being construed to: (1) prohibit an employer from requiring an employee to adhere to reasonable dress or grooming standards, or (2) require the construction of new or additional facilities. (Sec. 9) Prohibits the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the Secretary of Labor from compelling collection or requiring production of statistics from covered entities on actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity pursuant to this Act. (Sec. 10) Provides for the administration and enforcement of this Act, including by giving the EEOC, Librarian of Congress, Attorney General (DOJ), and U.S. courts the same enforcement powers as they have under specified provisions of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Government Employee Rights Act of 1991, Congressional Accountability Act of 1995, and other laws granting rights and protections to certain applicants and employees. Prohibits an individual who files claims alleging an unlawful employment practice under this Act in addition to alleging an unlawful employment practice because of sex under the Civil Rights Act of 1964 from receiving double recovery under both Acts. Authorizes the court, in a case in which sexual orientation or gender identity was proven to be a motivating factor but the respondent then demonstrates that the same action would have been taken in the absence of the impermissible motivating factor, to grant declaratory relief, injunctive relief, and attorney's fees and costs demonstrated to be directly attributable only to the pursuit of the claim. Prohibits the court, in such an instance, from awarding damages or issuing an order requiring any admission, reinstatement, hiring, promotion, or payment. (Sec. 11) Allows actions and proceedings, subject to exception, against the United States and the states. Declares that a state's receipt or use of federal financial assistance for specified programs or activities constitutes a waiver of sovereign immunity to a suit brought by an employee or applicant for employment of that program or activity. Prohibits punitive damages from being available in actions and proceedings against states or the United States and limits compensatory damages in such cases to the extent specifically authorized. (Sec. 12) Permits a decisionmaker (other than the Attorney General) in an action or administrative proceeding under this Act to allow the prevailing party (other than the EEOC or the United States) a reasonable attorney's fee (including expert fees) as part of the costs, to the same extent as is permitted under specified civil and employee rights laws. Requires the EEOC and the United States to be liable for costs to the same extent as a private person. (Sec. 13) Provides authority for amended employee notices to be posted in employee areas for purposes of this Act, but does not require the posting of a separate notice. (Sec. 15) Prohibits this Act from invalidating or limiting the rights, remedies, or procedures available to an individual claiming discrimination prohibited under any other federal, state, or political subdivision laws.
  21. TexAgRepublican

    Swanner Announces Governor Campaign

    Jack Swanner Swanner for Governor ‘19 For Immediate Release College Station, TX - Speaking in his hometown, former Rep. Jack Swanner (R-TX) announced his campaign for Plains Governor. “Howdy! Thank you all for being here today. I have to say, being retired was nice for a few weeks, but it got old real fast. There’s only so many rounds of golf you can play. My wife predicted that this would happen when I announced my retirement, and as usual she was right and I was wrong. I just couldn’t stay out of the arena, and that’s why I am announcing my candidacy for Governor of the Plains Region! “This region needs solid conservative leadership. I’m running because we need to keep taxes low, stop illegal immigration, protect our Second Amendment rights, value the sanctity of life, and improve education. These are all issues that will be the focus of my campaign, and I look forward to meeting with the great people of this region as we begin our journey. Thank you, and God bless America!” View full PR
  22. Swanner for Governor ‘19 For Immediate Release College Station, TX - Speaking in his hometown, former Rep. Jack Swanner (R-TX) announced his campaign for Plains Governor. “Howdy! Thank you all for being here today. I have to say, being retired was nice for a few weeks, but it got old real fast. There’s only so many rounds of golf you can play. My wife predicted that this would happen when I announced my retirement, and as usual she was right and I was wrong. I just couldn’t stay out of the arena, and that’s why I am announcing my candidacy for Governor of the Plains Region! “This region needs solid conservative leadership. I’m running because we need to keep taxes low, stop illegal immigration, protect our Second Amendment rights, value the sanctity of life, and improve education. These are all issues that will be the focus of my campaign, and I look forward to meeting with the great people of this region as we begin our journey. Thank you, and God bless America!”
  23. Calvin Ward

    ForWardAR

    The GOP is going to tell you that cuts to housing and interior aren’t REALLY cuts. Also water isn’t wet, Mexico’s paying for the wall, and the President didn’t commit adultery with a porn star then bribe her. It’s all just a fantasy.
  24. Nubbie

    @RickSharpFL

    Perhaps if ForWardAR engaged us on the budget instead of grandstanding, he'd find out that no money would be diverted from housing and the environment. Stay tuned and I'll spell it out all for the American People.
  25. Northeast Gubernatorial candidate Sergey Lewinsky (R-MA) spoke in Arlington, VA about his plan to fix the DC Metro "It is an embarrassment that in our National Capital Region, we have one of the least functional public transit systems in the United States. Millions of people in Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia rely on the Metro to commute to school or work. Yet the Metro is in a death spiral. There are constant track fires, as in literally the tracks frequently light on fire and fill the tunnels with smoke. Poor service leads to fewer people using the Metro. Then, WMATA uses fewer people riding the metro as an excuse to cut service. Then, more people stop using it, and you can see where this ends up if we don't stop it. The DMV region needs a public transit system that works and provides good service, and you shouldn't take any Governor candidate seriously unless they have a plan to stop it." "For a long time, we were told that more funding was the magic bullet. If only we could get dedicated funding, they said, then all of Metro's problems would be fixed. Well, in 2017 dedicated funding finally happened. Virginia, Maryland, and DC all agreed to give more taxpayer money to Metro each year. And the result? Still a ton of delays, still poor maintenance, still declining ridership. And meanwhile, there is less money for other public works projects in this region. Arlington, for example, will be unable to build a much-needed fourth high school because a lot of that money went to Metro instead. And Metro didn't have the courtesy to use that money effectively." "No, throwing money at the problem won't work. We need real reform at Metro, and as your next Governor that is what I will fight to do." "Here's a dirty little secret: 77% of Metro's operating budget, which should be used for improving the tracks and buying new trains, actually goes to paying pensions for workers. This is unsustainable. We need to realign the pension plan to make it more in line with what is realistic and practical. We need to look at what roles and responsibilities we can shift to contractors that do no have a pension cost for the taxpayer. And we need to reform rules that allow Metro employees to shirk their duties. For example, current rules allow the union to reinstate workers who have been fired for glaring safety mistakes, which can lead to the deaths of dozens if a train derails or catches fire. Current rules allow senior, experienced escalator repairmen to pick which stations they work at, which means the escalators that need the most work end up being worked on by the least experienced workers. These rules need to change. We need to make the rules more merit-based, making it easier to promote or give raises to good workers and easier to demote or fire bac workers. Metro workers have the right to unionize and negotiate better pay and benefits, but they do not have the right to endanger or bankrupt the public." "Democrats might call me anti-labor. But what does that word mean? Is it anti-labor to say that millions of workers in the DC area deserve a clean, safe, and timely ride to work? What about all of the restaurant and retail workers who get fired if they arrive late to work: is it anti-labor to say that they deserve a train that gets them to work on time? We can't put the interests of a small group of union bosses ahead of the interests of all of this region's workers." "As your next Governor, I will put the region's workers and commuters first. I will fix the reasons that Metro can't effectively get any value for taxpayer dollars. And by fixing that problem, I will allow Metro to actually move ahead with track work and improvements. We will repair the tracks and make the constant fires go way. We will expand service and reduce the amount of time you spend waiting for a train. And we'll also have money left over to improve bus service, such as by adding dedicated bus lanes on major transit corridors like the Columbia Pike in Arlington or 16th Street and Georgia Avenue in the District." "Want a better transit system? Elect a better Governor."
  26. LM32

    ALERT Act

    CS
  27. LM32

    Thin Blue Line Act

    CS
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