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Mike Solin - Southern Tour - Orlando, Florida

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Mike Solin continues Southern Tour in Orlando, Florida.

     According to a study done by the Federal Department of Education, released this week, 94 percent of public school teachers in the United States reported paying for supplies without reimbursement.  The teachers who reported spending their own money on supplies shelled out $479 each on average, according to the survey. Seven percent reported spending more than $1,000.  Why is it that our schools are so underfunded that the employees who work there, for low pay mind you, have to spend their own money to help their students?  There are crowdsource funding websites geared to helping classes acquire the funding they need for basic school supplies, desks, and school trips.  Under my education and economic plan, we will fight to make sure that our teachers salaries go up and that the schools have the money they need to have everything their students need in order to be successful in their developmental years.  Our opponents want school choice; however, school choice doesn't matter if all the options are underfunded.  We will not leave students behind in a Solin Administration.

I would gladly take questions about this topic or any other questions you might have about this campaign.

 

OOC:

https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2018097

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9 hours ago, Phillip Huffines said:

Mr. Solin,

Isn't the money teachers spend on supplies already tax deductible?

      I think it’s unfortunate that teachers have to pay for school supplies period.   Teachers shouldn't have to pay up front for school supplies only to get a deduction later in the year.  We could just as easily fund the schools in the first place making lives easier for the teachers and the accountants filing their taxes.  We learn in economic basics that the value of money is greater now than it is in a year.  What our school system has become is teachers being forced to provide interest free loans to the school so that they can function properly.  Even then, it isn't enough.  

       Thus, my plan is to make people's lives easier.  Specifically, in this instance, our school teachers, our students, and education system.  Teachers are some of the biggest heroes operating within the country as they shape the character and ability of our next generation.  I want to help them do their jobs even better than they already are by equipping them with the support and funding they deserve.

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Given any thought to perhaps giving teachers less money (they are already horribly overpaid relative to the marketplace), and to put those dollars directly in to the kinds of school programs that have actually shown to increase school achievement? In other words, as teacher pay has risen, relative to the market, our scores are going down and kids are far less well educated than in generations past. If we cared about kids, why are do we continue to cave to a teachers union that simply doesn't care about kids anymore?

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13 hours ago, Pizzuto said:

Given any thought to perhaps giving teachers less money (they are already horribly overpaid relative to the marketplace), and to put those dollars directly in to the kinds of school programs that have actually shown to increase school achievement? In other words, as teacher pay has risen, relative to the market, our scores are going down and kids are far less well educated than in generations past. If we cared about kids, why are do we continue to cave to a teachers union that simply doesn't care about kids anymore?

     Giving teachers less money is definitely the wrong way to go.  I agree that we should be investing dollars into school programs and investing in our schools via designated funding that can be used for specific purposes.  I believe many concerns from the Republicans about education funding is that it is often poorly spent or used inefficiently.  If the funding given to schools are intended for specific programs, educational opportunities, supplies, and learning materials, that might make a bipartisan deal more likely to succeed. 

      In Ohio, teachers earn about $56,000 per year, which is not unreasonable; however, teachers with no experience in Europe start out earning about $79,000 per year with veteran teachers earning about $137,000.  When you talk about "results" this is why they are beating us.  Teachers are empowered in Europe while in America they are degraded and undermined.  I will not entertain plans that cut teacher pay.  We will work on improving it and improving our educational opportunities for our youth. 

     Your comment about unions is understandable.  Unions are key in giving people a voice; however, they are accountable to public and their members.  We will need to work alongside the teacher's unions and find ways to reward and empower good teachers and either remove or retrain poor teachers.

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22 minutes ago, Doomhammer said:

     Giving teachers less money is definitely the wrong way to go.  I agree that we should be investing dollars into school programs and investing in our schools via designated funding that can be used for specific purposes.  I believe many concerns from the Republicans about education funding is that it is often poorly spent or used inefficiently.  If the funding given to schools are intended for specific programs, educational opportunities, supplies, and learning materials, that might make a bipartisan deal more likely to succeed. 

      In Ohio, teachers earn about $56,000 per year, which is not unreasonable; however, teachers with no experience in Europe start out earning about $79,000 per year with veteran teachers earning about $137,000.  When you talk about "results" this is why they are beating us.  Teachers are empowered in Europe while in America they are degraded and undermined.  I will not entertain plans that cut teacher pay.  We will work on improving it and improving our educational opportunities for our youth. 

     Your comment about unions is understandable.  Unions are key in giving people a voice; however, they are accountable to public and their members.  We will need to work alongside the teacher's unions and find ways to reward and empower good teachers and either remove or retrain poor teachers.

Mr. Solin,

The biggest opponents to rewarding good teachers and punishing bad teachers has been teacher unions. How can we work alongside the biggest defenders of a broken system to reform the system? By rewarding them with more money?

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14 hours ago, Phillip Huffines said:

Mr. Solin,

The biggest opponents to rewarding good teachers and punishing bad teachers has been teacher unions. How can we work alongside the biggest defenders of a broken system to reform the system? By rewarding them with more money?

Using three different kinds of survey data from the National Center for Education Statistics, it was confirmed that unionized districts dismiss more low-quality teachers than those with weak unions or no unions. Unionized districts also retain more high-quality teachers relative to district with weak unionism.  Unions do need to hold their members accountable.  There are some instances where unions may protect specific, poor performing teachers that people may not like just like any organization might protect some of their members or employees; however, it is a myth that the teacher's union opposes punishing bad teachers.  They do dismiss poor teachers quite often and reward high performing teachers.

 

OOC:

http://haveyouheardblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Han_Teacher_dismissal_Feb_16.pdf

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5 hours ago, TexAgRepublican said:

Do you support our troops and their mission against ISIS?

     I absolutely support our troops.  I agree with President Fitzgerald that America has to provide assistance in this fight against ISIS.  By providing our Air Force and Naval Assets, we are able to combat ISIS with fewer American casualties than putting soldiers on the grounds of Syria and Iraq.  With Russia and Kurdish support, I would also call for our European allies and Canadian friends to contribute to a coalition effort to root out ISIS from the middle east.  America should not intervene alone; however, as a conductor of a global alliance to demolish the evil that has perverted Islam and caused great harm to the safety and stability of the world, America has to lead.

     Additionally, we should go farther to combat ISIS’s propaganda and recruitment.  I do not believe ISIS’s ground forces are half as powerful as their ability to infiltrate the minds of young people all over the globe by using the internet.  We need to find ways to damage, take down, and prevent ISIS from having recruitment websites and silence their propaganda.  One of their greatest tools is to manipulate a young person into doing a heinous act against their own country.   

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4 hours ago, Jonathan said:

Senator Solin,

What is your opinion of the Bipartisan Healthcare Act that was just announced by President Fitzgerald and Chairman Doyle?

I think it is a wonderful example of our elected officials putting aside partisan politics and doing right by the American people.  I support this bill. 

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On 5/21/2018 at 11:48 AM, Doomhammer said:

Using three different kinds of survey data from the National Center for Education Statistics, it was confirmed that unionized districts dismiss more low-quality teachers than those with weak unions or no unions. Unionized districts also retain more high-quality teachers relative to district with weak unionism.  Unions do need to hold their members accountable.  There are some instances where unions may protect specific, poor performing teachers that people may not like just like any organization might protect some of their members or employees; however, it is a myth that the teacher's union opposes punishing bad teachers.  They do dismiss poor teachers quite often and reward high performing teachers.

 

OOC:

http://haveyouheardblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Han_Teacher_dismissal_Feb_16.pdf

 

@Doomhammer What about rubber room teachers? You say you are pro union but not necessarily pro-bad teachers...........but unions are the ones protecting teachers who are bad teachers and should be fired.

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8 hours ago, Shiggy said:

 

@Doomhammer What about rubber room teachers? You say you are pro union but not necessarily pro-bad teachers...........but unions are the ones protecting teachers who are bad teachers and should be fired.

Basically, we should put pressure on unions to take more action against bad teachers.  The issue is what is propaganda and what is reality.  When school districts have a strong union presence, they tend to perform better and have higher quality results than less active union districts.   Perhaps there needs to be a better way to identify what is a "bad" teacher.

Edited by Doomhammer

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1 minute ago, Doomhammer said:

Basically, we should put pressure on unions to take more action against bad teachers

 

But obviously that is not happening.............You know sir what a rubber room is right? A room where teachers accused of misconduct or even just incompetence BY THE SCHOOL DISTRICT AND THE SCHOOLS go to work and sit around all day.......all while still being employed by the school district and receiving a paycheck. 

 

That is BECAUSE the teachers unions keep those teachers from being fired. These are teachers who are not just disliked by students......they are teachers who in any other job or any private school with performance and employee standards would be fired.

 

My simple question to you sir, is whether or not you would change the law in order to fire teachers who are payed to sit in a room and do crossword puzzles becuase they cannot be fired, but are so incompetent or unethical that they are not trusted to teach our youth?

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15 minutes ago, Shiggy said:

 

But obviously that is not happening.............You know sir what a rubber room is right? A room where teachers accused of misconduct or even just incompetence BY THE SCHOOL DISTRICT AND THE SCHOOLS go to work and sit around all day.......all while still being employed by the school district and receiving a paycheck. 

 

That is BECAUSE the teachers unions keep those teachers from being fired. These are teachers who are not just disliked by students......they are teachers who in any other job or any private school with performance and employee standards would be fired.

 

My simple question to you sir, is whether or not you would change the law in order to fire teachers who are payed to sit in a room and do crossword puzzles becuase they cannot be fired, but are so incompetent or unethical that they are not trusted to teach our youth?

     Yes, I am open to adapting the law.  Specifically, I want to fix the investigation duration of the process.

     I do know what a rubber room is.  And rubber rooms do not help anyone.  The school district, the tax payers, nor the teachers themselves.  First of all, teachers who are sent to the 'rubber room' are under investigation for misconduct regardless of the extent of the infraction.  They do collect a paycheck as they deserve the right to be innocent until proven guilty.  The person who started the rubber room thought that it would be best that teachers do not stay home while the investigation takes place but should be somewhere isolated from the students until the matter is resolved.  The issue in this case is the extensive process of the investigation which takes months or even years.  There have been various examples where teachers do go back to teaching after an extended period of time in the rubber room while others result in termination or early retirement.  I would definitely be for finding ways to shorten these investigations to get good teachers who are sent to the rubber room with minor infractions back into the classrooms with perhaps some better training and officially exterminate the contracts of teachers who committed misconduct or incompetence.

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9 hours ago, Doomhammer said:

     Yes, I am open to adapting the law.  Specifically, I want to fix the investigation duration of the process.

     I do know what a rubber room is.  And rubber rooms do not help anyone.  The school district, the tax payers, nor the teachers themselves.  First of all, teachers who are sent to the 'rubber room' are under investigation for misconduct regardless of the extent of the infraction.  They do collect a paycheck as they deserve the right to be innocent until proven guilty.  The person who started the rubber room thought that it would be best that teachers do not stay home while the investigation takes place but should be somewhere isolated from the students until the matter is resolved.  The issue in this case is the extensive process of the investigation which takes months or even years.  There have been various examples where teachers do go back to teaching after an extended period of time in the rubber room while others result in termination or early retirement.  I would definitely be for finding ways to shorten these investigations to get good teachers who are sent to the rubber room with minor infractions back into the classrooms with perhaps some better training and officially exterminate the contracts of teachers who committed misconduct or incompetence.

 

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