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Kurt Faulhammer

Stronger Americas Joint Security and Institutional Reform Act

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Stronger Americas Joint Security and Institutional Reform Act

 

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Mr. Faulhammer (For himself, on behalf of President Macmillan) introduced the following bill;

 

A Bill

 

To create a joint security and institutional reform agreement between the United States, Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, and Colombia

 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

 

SECTION 1: SHORT TITLE

This act may be cited as the “Stronger Americas Joint Security and Institutional Reform Act”

 

SECTION 2: FINDINGS

 

  1. Crime in Central America has cost Central Americans collectively 3.5% GDP or $261 billion, $300 per person.

  2. Latin American investments in public security are often inefficient and focused in the wrong areas.

  3. Courts in developing nations lack trust in the rule of law.

  4. The current Central America Regional Security Initiative has shown successful results.

  5. Problem oriented policing has a large record of success.

  6. Partnership for Growth agreements have shown to be productive.

  7. Investment in regional security could unlock economic potential, make travel for American citizens safer, and lower the need for migrants to illegal immigrate to the United States.

 

SECTION 3: ACTIONS

 

(a) Increase funding for Central America Regional Security Initiative from $250 million a year to $1.5 billion a year

 

(b) Alliance for Prosperity funding increased from $750 million to $1.250 billion

 

(c) United States Department of Justice will coordinate with cooperating nations judiciary to facilitate training assistance and assist in the facilitation of protection programs for judges, witnesses, and prosecutors.

 

(d) The United States will fund match cooperating nation governments for protection programs for judges, witnesses, and prosecutors expenses one dollar for every two the cooperating government invests. (Capped at $500 million per nation)

 

(e) The United States will fund match funding increases for secondary and tertiary schools one dollar for every two dollars a cooperating government invests (capped at $350 million per nation)

 

(f)The United States will match funding for digital monitoring technology one dollar for every two dollars the cooperating government invests (Capped at $200 million per nation)

 

(g) Enhance information sharing on criminal deportees and support American reintegration programs for returning migrants (Capped at $150 million per nation)

 

(h) All cooperating nations must agree to a full extradition agreement with the United States

 

(i) The State Department’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement will coordinate with national police force of cooperating nation

 

(j) Strengthen frameworks for trilateral information sharing on trans-national criminal groups among all nations

 

(h) Advisory support from the United States for police forces, judiciaries, and security forces with the creation of an exchange program for law enforcement and judiciaries.

 

(i) Joint training missions between the US CBP and cooperation nation’s equivalent counterpart

 

(j) Collaboration between United States IRS and cooperation nation equivalent counterpart to enhance tax collection efforts and strengthen institutional capacity

 

(l) All cooperating nations are expected to adopt the creation of a commission similar in nature to the International Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala

 

(m) Grant temporary protected status for Guatemalans and extend protections for Hondurans and Salvadorans another four years

 

(n) Allocate new special temporary work visas to the United States for cooperating nations (70k per country)

 

(o) US Peace Corps increase in cooperating nations

 

(p) Establish problem-oriented policing programs in cooperating nations police departments based on findings from Boston’s Operation Ceasefire, Belo Horizonte’s Staying Alive program, and Colombia’s cuadrantes plan.

 

(q) Cooperating nations will enter into a Partnership for Growth agreement with the United States with the following five components

  1. Constraints Analysis (CA): rigorous, jointly conducted analysis and identification of the principle constraints to economic growth in cooperating nation.

  2. Joint Country Action Plan (JCAP): a mutually developed agreement between the United States government and cooperating nation’s governments that includes 20 goals to alleviate the 2 principle constraints to growth identified by the CA.

  3. Whole-of-Government Approach (WGA): joint decision-making to target resources, based on transparency and accountability among all cooperating institutions.

  4. Twice-Year Scorecards: meeting every six months within and between the United States government and the cooperating nation’s government to assess progress on meeting the 20 JCAP goals.

  5. Non-Program Assistance: a broad range of tools that do not carry a program-specific funding, including interorganizational resource sharing, institutional reform, diplomatic engagement, and other “non-assistance” policy tool.

 

Under the Partnership for Growth agreement the cooperating nation will be expected to already have or to looking to pass legislation in regards to:

  1. Civil asset forfeiture

  2. Access to public information

  3. Public-private partnership

  4. Tax law revision

  5. Promote investment and facilitate commerce

 

Under the Partnership for Growth agreement the cooperating nation will be expected to already have or looking to establish the following institutions:

  1. An export and investment promotion agency

  2. An institute for access to public Information

  3. A national growth council

 

SECTION 5: EFFECTIVE DATE

 

The bill should go into effect upon its Constitutional passage.

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11 minutes ago, Jsawrie said:

Mr. Speaker, parliamentary inquiry. 

Is this a treaty?

Mr. Ward,

Yes this is a treaty the White House has already presented to the listed governments.

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Mr. Speaker, 

 

I applaud the efforts of the President on this treaty, however this needs to go to the Senate for advice and consent under Article II of the Constitution.

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Mr. Speaker, 

I agree with my colleague. Per the constitution, this belongs in the Senate, though we appreciate the President’s willingness to let us see it. 

I yield

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Mr. Speaker,

 

I object. A treaty such as this should be given the full discussion it deserves.

 

I yield

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Mr Speaker,

The Gentleman from Wisconsin wants discussion so let's have some. This bill is a terrific compliment to the Immigration bill also before this very house, it is if you will one half of a root and branch solution. By cleaning up the Central American countries that have such awful track records that they force illegal aliens to flee north of the border we will reduce the flow of illegal migrants complimenting the tough no exceptions policy we are instituting in the other bill.

I yield.

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Mr. Speaker,

 

I withdraw my objection and I second the motion for UC. I look forward to seeing these efforts to combat crime in Central America take place. 

 

I yield 

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9 hours ago, Kurt Faulhammer said:

Stronger Americas Joint Security and Institutional Reform Act

 

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Mr. Faulhammer (For himself, on behalf of President Macmillan) introduced the following bill;

 

A Bill

 

To create a joint security and institutional reform agreement between the United States, Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, and Colombia

 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

 

SECTION 1: SHORT TITLE

This act may be cited as the “Stronger Americas Joint Security and Institutional Reform Act”

 

SECTION 2: FINDINGS

 

  1. Crime in Central America has cost Central Americans collectively 3.5% GDP or $261 billion, $300 per person.

  2. Latin American investments in public security are often inefficient and focused in the wrong areas.

  3. Courts in developing nations lack trust in the rule of law.

  4. The current Central America Regional Security Initiative has shown successful results.

  5. Problem oriented policing has a large record of success.

  6. Partnership for Growth agreements have shown to be productive.

  7. Investment in regional security could unlock economic potential, make travel for American citizens safer, and lower the need for migrants to illegal immigrate to the United States.

 

SECTION 3: ACTIONS

 

(a) Increase funding for Central America Regional Security Initiative from $250 million a year to $1.5 billion a year

 

(b) Alliance for Prosperity funding increased from $750 million to $1.250 billion

 

(c) United States Department of Justice will coordinate with cooperating nations judiciary to facilitate training assistance and assist in the facilitation of protection programs for judges, witnesses, and prosecutors.

 

(d) The United States will fund match cooperating nation governments for protection programs for judges, witnesses, and prosecutors expenses one dollar for every two the cooperating government invests. (Capped at $500 million per nation)

 

(e) The United States will fund match funding increases for secondary and tertiary schools one dollar for every two dollars a cooperating government invests (capped at $350 million per nation)

 

(f)The United States will match funding for digital monitoring technology one dollar for every two dollars the cooperating government invests (Capped at $200 million per nation)

 

(g) Enhance information sharing on criminal deportees and support American reintegration programs for returning migrants (Capped at $150 million per nation)

 

(h) All cooperating nations must agree to a full extradition agreement with the United States

 

(i) The State Department’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement will coordinate with national police force of cooperating nation

 

(j) Strengthen frameworks for trilateral information sharing on trans-national criminal groups among all nations

 

(h) Advisory support from the United States for police forces, judiciaries, and security forces with the creation of an exchange program for law enforcement and judiciaries.

 

(i) Joint training missions between the US CBP and cooperation nation’s equivalent counterpart

 

(j) Collaboration between United States IRS and cooperation nation equivalent counterpart to enhance tax collection efforts and strengthen institutional capacity

 

(l) All cooperating nations are expected to adopt the creation of a commission similar in nature to the International Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala

 

(m) Grant temporary protected status for Guatemalans and extend protections for Hondurans and Salvadorans another four years

 

(n) Allocate new special temporary work visas to the United States for cooperating nations (70k per country)

 

(o) US Peace Corps increase in cooperating nations

 

(p) Establish problem-oriented policing programs in cooperating nations police departments based on findings from Boston’s Operation Ceasefire, Belo Horizonte’s Staying Alive program, and Colombia’s cuadrantes plan.

 

(q) Cooperating nations will enter into a Partnership for Growth agreement with the United States with the following five components

  1. Constraints Analysis (CA): rigorous, jointly conducted analysis and identification of the principle constraints to economic growth in cooperating nation.

  2. Joint Country Action Plan (JCAP): a mutually developed agreement between the United States government and cooperating nation’s governments that includes 20 goals to alleviate the 2 principle constraints to growth identified by the CA.

  3. Whole-of-Government Approach (WGA): joint decision-making to target resources, based on transparency and accountability among all cooperating institutions.

  4. Twice-Year Scorecards: meeting every six months within and between the United States government and the cooperating nation’s government to assess progress on meeting the 20 JCAP goals.

  5. Non-Program Assistance: a broad range of tools that do not carry a program-specific funding, including interorganizational resource sharing, institutional reform, diplomatic engagement, and other “non-assistance” policy tool.

 

Under the Partnership for Growth agreement the cooperating nation will be expected to already have or to looking to pass legislation in regards to:

  1. Civil asset forfeiture

  2. Access to public information

  3. Public-private partnership

  4. Tax law revision

  5. Promote investment and facilitate commerce

 

Under the Partnership for Growth agreement the cooperating nation will be expected to already have or looking to establish the following institutions:

  1. An export and investment promotion agency

  2. An institute for access to public Information

  3. A national growth council

 

SECTION 5: EFFECTIVE DATE

 

The bill should go into effect upon its Constitutional passage.

 

Faulhammer
Republicans Democrats
NAT EV BUS MR MD SJW PRO GL
Previous Rating 15 7 23 22 19 15 14 11
Change -2 1 2 5 3 2 -3 4
New Rating 13 8 25 27 22 17 11 15

Nationalists want Section 3n removed. Progressives think the money should be spent at home.

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