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Kurt Faulhammer

Faulhammer on Republican Educational Initiative

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Kurt Faulhammer

 

 

From the Office of Speaker Kurt Faulhammer

 

 

A recent report by OECD has shown that the United States has continued to decline academically compared to other countries in the world. Instead of ignoring this reality like some have suggested, we in the Republican majority in the House of Representatives have put forth a docket that seeks to correct this issue. Instead of increasing federal government intervention in education like we saw much of under the Obama administration that did not stop the trend of American educational decline relative to other countries we are looking to empower state and local governments to have greater control over education.

Two bills in particular help achieve this: the Make Education Local Act and Ending Common Core Act. The first of which, the Make Education Local Act, allows states to set their own individual education policy. It takes the federal government out of the classroom, reduces the regulatory burden placed on schools by Washington bureaucracy, and lets local leaders more flexibly and efficiently distribute funds of education. The bill increases transparency by requiring states in their State Management Decision to outline their plan for using educational funds and how they will inform parents of student achievement. Additionally the bill ensures  accountability by requiring the states to publish a yearly report of student performance, a description of how funds are being used to improve academic achievement, and information for the public regarding other high-quality school options and choices.

The second bill the reduces federal government in education is the Ending Common Core Act. Recent Gallup Polls have shown teachers in the country oppose Common Core 51-41, so we are responding to that criticism and putting forth legislation that ends Common Core altogether. Common Core puts distrust in our teachers and is just more evidence that one-size-fits-all educational policy doesn't work. Having a strong nationalized education system is not indicative of improved academic performance. For example, Canada which is more than 20 places ahead of the United States on the PISA scale despite not having a centralized education department. Rather funds are allocated to the provinces and territories themselves to decide on their implementation. Additionally the United States spends more than $11,000 per student yet scores similarly on the PISA scale as Slovak Republic which only spends roughly $5,000 per student. For all that we spend on education the tangible benefits are minimal. Federal educational monitoring programs can only guarantee one result: a large sum of taxpayer dollars will be consumed and that is what we have seen with Common Core. Our founders never envisioned the federal government dictating to teachers how to teach and we should get the federal government out of their way.

There are three more bills that are apart of the Republican majority in the House of Representative's initiative on education. They are the High Poverty School Teacher Tax Credit Act, STOP School Violence Act, and Go to High School, Go to College Act. First, let's talk about the High Poverty School Teacher Tax Credit Act. Schools that have a population of students in greater poverty struggle to attract and retain teachers. This is both costly in terms of finances for districts in finding new teachers and costly in terms of student outcomes with instability that comes from an insecure teaching staff. Additionally between schools with high poverty and low poverty there is both a quality gap in teachers and a pay gap between teachers. This bill creates an after-tax income tax credit for teachers in schools with 75% or more of their students on free or reduced-price lunch of $10,000 that will eliminate the gap in pay and create incentive for teachers to teach in these schools. Additionally for teachers in schools with 50%-74% of their students on free or reduced-price lunch there is a progressively reduced tax credit so that if the population of a school significantly improves in relations to their socio-economic status there isn't a gigantic drop off for teachers. All this additionally doesn't interfere with the teaching going on in the classroom it just aids the teachers. Teachers that serve our poorest of students deserve support and this bill will do just that. Increasing teacher pay for schools with high poverty will make teaching there more attractive and entice effective candidates to enter and remain in the profession thereby increasing positive student outcomes.

Secondly there is the STOP School Violence Act. This bill establishes a grant program for school security through the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968. These grants will be given out by the Bureau of Justice to the state and local governments for many safety measures including: metal detectors and other deterrent measures, emergency notification and response technologies, training for law enforcement personal, school officials, and students to prevent violence, specialized mental health training, security training, the development of anonymous reporting systems, development and operation of school threat assessment and intervention teams, and any other measure determined by the director of the Bureau of Justice that may provide significant security improvements for schools. Student safety is a top priority and this bill will help everyone have more peace of mind in schools.

Lastly there is the Go to High School, Go to College Act. This bill amends the Higher Education Act of 1965 to allow the Secretary of Education to award Early College Federal Pell Grants. This will allow eligible high school students to earn transferable college credits up to an associates degree tuition-free in an early college program offered by an accredited institution of higher learning. Studies have shown that by increasing access to early college programs will bring about an increase in college completion and ultimately reduce the time and cost of earning a college degree. This bill will increase opportunities for low-income students and help them get a head start on college so that they can find greater success in adulthood.

All these measures put forth by the Republican majority in the House of Representatives will help our country rebound academically and I hope to see them on the President's desk as soon as possible.

 

 

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Edited by Kurt Faulhammer

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3 hours ago, Kurt Faulhammer said:

Kurt Faulhammer

 

 

From the Office of Speaker Kurt Faulhammer

 

 

A recent report by OECD has shown that the United States has continued to decline academically compared to other countries in the world. Instead of ignoring this reality like some have suggested, we in the Republican majority in the House of Representatives have put forth a docket that seeks to correct this issue. Instead of increasing federal government intervention in education like we saw much of under the Obama administration that did not stop the trend of American educational decline relative to other countries we are looking to empower state and local governments to have greater control over education.

Two bills in particular help achieve this: the Make Education Local Act and Ending Common Core Act. The first of which, the Make Education Local Act, allows states to set their own individual education policy. It takes the federal government out of the classroom, reduces the regulatory burden placed on schools by Washington bureaucracy, and lets local leaders more flexibly and efficiently distribute funds of education. The bill increases transparency by requiring states in their State Management Decision to outline their plan for using educational funds and how they will inform parents of student achievement. Additionally the bill ensures  accountability by requiring the states to publish a yearly report of student performance, a description of how funds are being used to improve academic achievement, and information for the public regarding other high-quality school options and choices.

The second bill the reduces federal government in education is the Ending Common Core Act. Recent Gallup Polls have shown teachers in the country oppose Common Core 51-41, so we are responding to that criticism and putting forth legislation that ends Common Core altogether. Common Core puts distrust in our teachers and is just more evidence that one-size-fits-all educational policy doesn't work. Having a strong nationalized education system is not indicative of improved academic performance. For example, Canada which is more than 20 places ahead of the United States on the PISA scale despite not having a centralized education department. Rather funds are allocated to the provinces and territories themselves to decide on their implementation. Additionally the United States spends more than $11,000 per student yet scores similarly on the PISA scale as Slovak Republic which only spends roughly $5,000 per student. For all that we spend on education the tangible benefits are minimal. Federal educational monitoring programs can only guarantee one result: a large sum on taxpayer dollars will be consumed and that is what we have seen with Common Core. Our founders never envisioned the federal government dictating to teachers how to teach and we should get the federal government out of their way.

There are three more bills that are apart of the Republican majority in the House of Representative's initiative on education. They are the High Poverty School Teacher Tax Credit Act, STOP School Violence Act, and Go to High School, Go to College Act. First, let's talk about the High Poverty School Teacher Tax Credit Act. Schools that have a population of students in greater poverty struggle to attract and retain teachers. This is both costly in terms of finances for districts in finding new teachers and costly in terms of student outcomes with instability that comes from an insecure teaching staff. Additionally between schools with high poverty and low poverty there is both a quality gap in teachers and a pay gap between teachers. This bill creates an after-tax income tax credit for teachers in schools with 75% or more of their students on free or reduced-price lunch of $10,000 that will eliminate the gap in pay and create incentive for teachers to teach in these schools. Additionally for teachers in schools with 50%-74% of their students on free or reduced-price lunch there is a progressively reduced tax credit so that if the population of a school significantly improves in relations to their socio-economic status there isn't a gigantic drop off for teachers. All this additionally doesn't interfere with the teaching going on in the classroom it just aids the teachers. Teachers that serve our poorest of students deserve support and this bill will do just that. Increasing teacher pay for schools with high poverty will make teaching there more attractive and entice effective candidates to enter and remain in the profession thereby increasing positive student outcomes.

Secondly there is the STOP School Violence Act. This bill establishes a grant program for school security through the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968. These grants will be given out by the Bureau of Justice to the state and local governments for many safety measures including: metal detectors and other deterrent measures, emergency notification and response technologies, training for law enforcement personal, school officials, and students to prevent violence, specialized mental health training, security training, the development of anonymous reporting systems, development and operation of school threat assessment and intervention teams, and any other measure determined by the director of the Bureau of Justice that may provide significant security improvements for schools. Student safety is a top priority and this bill will help everyone have more peace of mind in schools.

Lastly there is the Go to High School, Go to College Act. This bill amends the Higher Education Act of 1965 to allow the Secretary of Education to award Early College Federal Pell Grants. This will allow eligible high school students to earn transferable college credits up to an associates degree tuition-free in an early college program offered by an accredited institution of higher learning. Studies have shown that by increasing access to early college programs will bring about an increase in college completion and ultimately reduce the time and cost of earning a college degree. This bill will increase opportunities for low-income students and help them get a head start on college so that they can find greater success in adulthood.

All these measures put forth by the Republican majority in the House of Representatives will help our country rebound academically and I hope to see them on the President's desk as soon as possible.

 

 

View full PR

 

Momentum: 5

One of the best PRs I've seen in awhile.

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PLAYER NAME
Republicans Democrats
NAT EV BUS MR ML SJW  PRO GLO
Change 2 4 4 5 2 0 0 0
Edited by Jonathan

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