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Kurt Faulhammer

VOTE: H 1-2. Tariff Act of 1789

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Mr. Lloyd presented the following;

An Act for laying a Duty on Goods, Wares, and Merchandises imported into the United States.

Sec. 1. Whereas it is necessary for the support of government, for the discharge of the debts of the United States, and the encouragement and protection of manufactures, that duties be laid on goods, wares and merchandises imported:

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That from and after the first day of August next ensuing, the several duties hereinafter mentioned shall be laid on the following goods, wares and merchandises imported into the United States from any foreign port or place, that is to say:

On all distilled spirits of Jamaica proof, imported from any kingdom or country whatsoever, per gallon, ten cents.

On all other distilled spirits, per gallon, eight cents.

On molasses, per gallon, two and a half cents.

On Madeira wine, per gallon, eighteen cents.

On all other wines, per gallon, ten cents.

On every gallon of beer, ale or porter in casks, five cents.

On all cider, beer, ale or porter in bottles, per dozen, twenty cents.

On malt, per bushel, ten cents.

On brown sugars, per pound, one cent.

On loaf sugars, per pound, three cents.

On all other sugars, per pound, one and a half cents.

On coffee, per pound, two and a half cents.

On cocoa, per pound, one cent.

On all candles of tallow, per pound, two cents.

On all candles of wax or spermaceti, per pound, six cents.

On cheese, per pound, four cents.

On soap, per pound, two cents.

On boots, per pair, fifty cents.

On all shoes, slippers or goloshoes made of leather, per pair, seven cents.

On all shoes or slippers made of silk or stuff; per pair, ten cents.

On cables, for every one hundred and twelve pounds, seventy-five cents.

On tarred cordage, for every one hundred and twelve pounds, seventy-five cents.

On untarred ditto, and yarn, for every one hundred and twelve pounds, ninety cents.

On twine or packthread, for every one hundred and twelve pounds, two hundred cents.

On all steel unwrought, for every one hundred and twelve pounds, fifty-six cents.

On all nails and spikes, per pound, one cent two cents.

On salt, per bushel, six cents ten cents.

On manufactured tobacco, per pound, six cents fifteen cents.

On snuff, per pound, ten cents twenty cents.

On indigo, per pound, sixteen cents. thirty cents.

On wool and cotton cards, per dozen, fifty cents seventy-five cents.

On coal, per bushel, two cents four cents.

On pickled fish, per barrel, seventy-five ninety-five cents.

On dried fish, per quintal, fifty ninety-five cents.

On all teas imported from China or India, in ships built in the United States, and belonging to a citizen or citizens thereof, or in ships or vessels built in foreign countries, and on the sixteenth day of May last wholly the property of a citizen or citizens of the United States, and so continuing until the time of importation, as follows:

On bohea tea, per pound, six cents.

On all souchong, or other black teas, per pound, ten cents.

On all hyson teas, per pound, twenty cents.

On all other green teas, per pound, twelve cents.

On all teas imported from Europe in ships or vessels built in the United States, and belonging wholly to a citizen or citizens thereof, orin ships or vessels built in foreign countries, and on the sixteenth day of May last wholly the property of a citizen or citizens of the United States, and so continuing until the time of importation, as follows:

On bohea tea, per pound, eight cents.

On all souchong, and other black teas, per pound, thirteen cents.

On all hyson teas, per pound, twenty-six cents.

On all other green teas, per pound, sixteen cents.

On all teas imported, in any other manner than as above mentioned, as follows:—

On bohea tea, per pound, fifteen cents.

On all souchong, or other black teas, per pound, twenty-two cents.

On all hyson teas, per pound, forty-five cents.

On all other green teas, per pound, twenty-seven cents.

On all goods, wares and merchandises, other than teas, imported from China or India, in ships not built in the United States, and not wholly the property of a citizen or citizens thereof, nor in vessels built in foreign countries, and on the sixteenth day of May last wholly the property of a citizen or citizens of the United States, and so continuing until the time of importation, twelve and a half per centum ad valorem.

On all looking-glasses, window and other glass (except black quart bottles),

On all China, stone and earthen ware,
On gunpowder,
On all paints ground in oil,
On shoe and knee buckles,
On gold and silver lace, and

On gold and silver leaf,

On all blank books,

On all writing, printing or wrapping paper, paper-hangings and pasteboard,
On all cabinet wares,
On all buttons,
On all saddles,
On all gloves of leather,
On all hats of beaver, fur, wool, or mixture of either,
On all millinery ready made,
On all castings of iron, and upon slit and rolled iron,
On all leather tanned or tawed, and all manufacture of leather, except such as shall be otherwise rated,
On canes, walking sticks and whips,
On clothing ready made,
On all brushes,
On gold, silver, and plated ware, and on jewelry and paste work,
On anchors, and on all wrought, tin, and pewter ware,
On playing cards, per pack, ten cents.

On every coach, chariot or other four wheel carriage, and on every chaise, solo, or other two wheel carriage, or parts thereof

On all other goods, wares and merchandise, five per centum on the value thereof at the time and place of importation, except as follows: saltpetre, tin in pigs, tin plates, lead, old pewter, brass, iron and brass wire, copper in plates,[3] wool, cotton, dyeing woods and dyeing drugs, raw hides, beaver, and all other furs, and deer skins.

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That from and after the first day of December, which shall be in the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety, there shall be laid a duty on every one hundred and twelve pounds, weight of hemp imported as aforesaid, of sixty cents; and on cotton per pound, three six cents,

Sec. 3. And be it [further] enacted by the authority aforesaid, That all the duties paid, or secured to be paid upon any of the goods, wares and merchandises as aforesaid, except on distilled spirits, other than brandy and geneva, shall be returned or discharged upon such of the said goods, wares, or merchandises, as shall within twelve months after payment made, or security given, be exported to any country without the limits of the United States, as settled by the late treaty of peace; except one per centum on the amount of the said duties, in consideration of the expense which shall have accrued by the entry and safe-keeping thereof.

Sec. 4. And be it [further] enacted by the authority aforesaid, ThatAllowance in lieu of a drawback on dried and pickled fish and salted provisions exported. there shall be allowed and paid on every quintal of dried, and on every barrel of pickled fish, of the fisheries of the United States, and on every barrel of salted provision of the United States, exported to any country without the limits thereof, in lieu of a drawback of the duties imposed on the importation of the salt employed and expended therein, viz:

On every quintal of dried fish, five cents.

On every barrel of pickled fish, five cents.

On every barrel of salted provision, five cents.

Sec. 5. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That a discount of ten per cent. on all the duties imposed by this act, shall be allowed on such goods, wares and merchandises, as shall be imported in vessels built in the United States, and which shall be wholly the property of a citizen or citizens thereof, or in vessels built in foreign countries, and on the sixteenth day of May last, wholly the property of a citizen or citizens of the United States, and so continuing until the time of importation.

Sec. 6. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That this act shall continue and be in force until the first day of June, which shall be in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety-six, and from thence until the end of the next succeeding session of Congress which shall be held thereafter, and no longer.

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Mr. Tyson vocally disagrees: 

The good sir's bill would be akin to what the King did to us when we were all colonies! Did we not just fight a war against these injustices? How many good men died to overturn these unfair taxes? How much liberty would we be willing to give up for a little temporary money? I say that those who would sacrifice liberty for a few coins in their coffers deserve neither!

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Speaker Frederick Muhlenberg (I-PA)

This bill is brought up for debate by the House for no less than 72 hours.

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Mr. Speaker,

It is well and good that some form of revenue generation be implemented by the new central government.  Certainly, if we are to make one nation, it is just and necessary that some manner of tariffs be implemented.  Yet it seems that the items these tariffs are being laid upon would necessarily favor certain regions of this new nation over other regions.  If we are to invite retaliatory tariffs, which these tariffs would surely engender, then surely it is right that we do not necessarily favor one region over any other.  If we are to implement tariffs, let us do so in an equitable manner, without regionalism or malice.  Unless these tariffs are balanced and made more equitable, I can not favor them at this time.

I yield.

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Mr. Tyson vocally disagrees: 

The good sir's bill would be akin to what the King did to us when we were all colonies! Did we not just fight a war against these injustices? How many good men died to overturn these unfair taxes? How much liberty would we be willing to give up for a little temporary money? I say that those who would sacrifice liberty for a few coins in their coffers deserve neither!

I yield.

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Mr. Speaker,

I can appreciate the passion of the gentleman from New York, but I don't believe that he means to seriously imply that no tariffs or taxes are necessary.  This newly formed nation must have a government which in turn must have revenues to perform its functions.  I simply believe it prudent to more equitably enforce such tariffs.

 

I propose the following be struck from the bill:

On malt, per bushel, ten cents.

On brown sugars, per pound, one cent.

On loaf sugars, per pound, three cents.

On all other sugars, per pound, one and a half cents.

On coffee, per pound, two and a half cents.

On cocoa, per pound, one cent.

On all candles of tallow, per pound, two cents.

On all candles of wax or spermaceti, per pound, six cents.

 

I would propose to increase the following tariffs:

On all nails and spikes, per pound, one cent two cents.

On salt, per bushel, six cents ten cents.

On manufactured tobacco, per pound, six cents fifteen cents.

On snuff, per pound, ten cents twenty cents.

On indigo, per pound, sixteen cents. thirty cents.

On wool and cotton cards, per dozen, fifty cents seventy-five cents.

On coal, per bushel, two cents four cents.

On pickled fish, per barrel, seventy-five ninety-five cents.

On dried fish, per quintal, fifty ninety-five cents.

on cotton per pound, three six cents,

 

I believe that increasing these tariffs would provide better revenues for our domestic industries, plantations, and fisheries, while also providing additional revenues to our new government.  I also believe that not implementing certain other tariffs would promote good will with other nations.  I hope this body approves of such changes.

 

I yield.

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Mr. Speaker, 

While I agree with the Gentleman from North Carolina, I would also request that the tariffs on walking assistants, playing cards, distilled spirits, and paper material also be lifted, as these would effect our poorest citizens the most. I yield.

Edited by LM32

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On 9/4/2018 at 12:34 AM, Magenta said:

On malt, per bushel, ten cents.

On brown sugars, per pound, one cent.

On loaf sugars, per pound, three cents.

On all other sugars, per pound, one and a half cents.

On coffee, per pound, two and a half cents.

On cocoa, per pound, one cent.

On all candles of tallow, per pound, two cents.

On all candles of wax or spermaceti, per pound, six cents.

 

I would propose to increase the following tariffs:

On all nails and spikes, per pound, one cent two cents.

On salt, per bushel, six cents ten cents.

On manufactured tobacco, per pound, six cents fifteen cents.

On snuff, per pound, ten cents twenty cents.

On indigo, per pound, sixteen cents. thirty cents.

On wool and cotton cards, per dozen, fifty cents seventy-five cents.

On coal, per bushel, two cents four cents.

On pickled fish, per barrel, seventy-five ninety-five cents.

On dried fish, per quintal, fifty ninety-five cents.

on cotton per pound, three six cents,

Having been properly seconded by Mr. Owens of Virginia, the Masterson Amendment is recognized for a 24 hour vote. Please vote by replying in this thread.

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Masterson Amendment
  Federalists Republicans Independents Total
Aye 18 11 30 59
Nay     5 5
Abstain     1 1
Total 18 11 36 65

 

The Amendment passes. The first post of this thread has been updated with the updated text of the bill.

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Time for debate has expired. We will now move to a 72 hour vote. Please cast your votes as a reply to this thread.

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