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Attorney General Nomination

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Mr. President,

Would Mr. Williams like to give an opening statement explaining why he is the best choice for Attorney General?

I yield.

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Mr. President,

If the nominee will not speak, answer questions, or advocate for why he is the best choice for Attorney General, I do not see how we can confirm him.

I yield.

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(Could have tagged me)

Williams appears and talks briefly about is family and how happy he is to be appointed Attorney General.

 

"Thank you. Being Attorney General is all about following and executing the laws passed by the United States Congress. To which I will do to the best of my ability. Having served both in a teaching role, prosecution role and private practice, I have a wealth of experience I can count on if I am fortunate enough to serve as Attorney General. I am happy to take any questions."

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Mr.Presiednt,

I'd like to ask Mr.Williams( @Conrad) what his view on the legalization of marijuana, and how to protect the youths of the country from the drug epidemic?

I yield.

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5 hours ago, Batman said:

Mr.Presiednt,

I'd like to ask Mr.Williams( @Conrad) what his view on the legalization of marijuana, and how to protect the youths of the country from the drug epidemic?

I yield.

Senator,

I don't think it would be appropriate for me to comment on what the Congress should do or pass. But I do think staying on a patchwork of different marijuana laws per state is wrong as there are question there were one would be guilty of a crime in Kansas but not in Colorado, for example. That being said if you folks here on the hill decide to change the law on marijuana I will enforce it just like any other law. 

Protecting the whole population from the drug epidemic is important but it should be a coordinated effort between the DoJ, HHS and the drug control center. There is also a very real endemic regarding opioid abuse among everyone in the United States and not just youths. Which I think could be addressed but thats more of a question for HHSand not DOJ.

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Very well, moving right along then what is your view of mandatory minimums, in general, do you believe them to be a helpful form of deterrence or not?

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1 minute ago, Batman said:

Very well, moving right along then what is your view of mandatory minimums, in general, do you believe them to be a helpful form of deterrence or not?

I think mandatory minimums have resulted in a reduction of serious crime because we have a system of harsh punishments here in the United States compared to other countries around the world. Keeping them in place would mean that a lot of the work that communities across the United States have done to keep them safe would be preserved. Is there anything specific you'd like to ask on them?

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Well, sir first I do have a couple questions,

1) Could you elaborate on what you mean by serious crime being brought down?

2) Also, what would you say to those who believe that they unfairly target minorities as minorities as more likely to go to prison then Caucasians?

3) There is also the question of whether or not these laws are just in one case there was a trial involving a mother of 4 was once paid USD100 to mail an unknown package to someone that contained hundreds of grams of crack cocaine, and the judge sentenced her to 10 years in prison, as the law dictated what had to be done even though the judge felt it unjust and irrational. Would you allow Judges to hand down decisions below the mandatory minimum in cases in which they deemed the mandatory minimum to be unjust and/or irrational?

(OOC: https://connectusfund.org/9-primary-pros-and-cons-of-mandatory-minimum-sentences for the case)

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1) The cost for doing the crime is a lot higher compared to actually following the law, leads to decreases in all types of crime. 

2) I can't really comment on past cases or future cases for that matter but a Justice Department led by me will enforce the law fairly.

3) I can't tell a judge what to do, Senator. But I do believe there is a safety valve to catch those who are first time non-violent offenders, which I believe works well for those who are genuinely sorry for what they did. In this specific case you refer to, I'm not sure of the circumstances surrounding this woman's case or how severe, or indeed her prior convictions. 

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Mr. Williams,

As I’m sure you know, the US has the highest rate of incarceration in the world, largely believed to be due to the policies my colleague has been asking you about, namely stringent marijuana enforcement and mandatory minimums.

Since you have come out in favor of these two policies, what do you believe the cause of high rates of incarceration are, and what do you intend to do to lower that rate?

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Also, similarly, high level financial crimes are extremely underpoliced, such as money laundering, insider trading, or market manipulation. I mean, very few of the culprits of the financial crisis of 2008 were prosecuted, and we knew who they were—James Comey even called them the “chickenshit club.” 

Do you intend to crack down on this type of crime? If so, how do you intend to do it?

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