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Vermont Resolution Act

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1st Congress

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES

Mr. Owens, for himself, introduced,

A BILL,

An Act appointing a delegation to negotiate a compromise of between New York and Vermont.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

Section. 1 - Title

(A) This act shall be known as the Vermont Resolution Act

Section. 2 - Delegation

(A) There shall be a delegation consisting of two Representative, two Senators, and a member of the Executive branch

(1) Delegation shall be chosen by the Speaker of the House, President Pro Tempore of the Senate, and President of the United States.

Section 3. - Authority

(A) The delegation created in this act shall have the authority to negotiate and present to Congress a compromise between the State of New York and the Vermont Territory.

Section 4. - Expiration

(A) This act shall expire when an adequate compromise is made between the parties.

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GAVEL

The House is now in session. The following bill will be debated for no more than 72 hours.

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Mr. Speaker,

I object to the motion for unanimous consent.  I'm not sure it is the role of the federal government to intervene in this matter, as the land claims in dispute are between the state of New York and the Vermont Republic.  If the government of New York feels this is an appropriate course for the federal government to intervene upon, let their state legislature or similar representatives indicate such; but it is not our place to supercede their authority on the matter without that state's consent.  Further, the stipulations for negotiations presented in this act are vague and uncertain.  As many members of the New York state legislature are reported to have favored utilizing their state militia to outright annex the disputed lands, it seems hard to imagine they wish to negotiate any sort of settlement or compromise.  Better at this juncture to accept that New York's state government committed a diplomatic blunder, rather than compound that blunder with further federal escalation.

I yield.

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While our governor has committed the blunder of acting aggressively, many New Yorkers would be happy with Vermont simply buying off the claims, which is why, as my constituents have asked of me,  I support this bill to remedy the failure of our Republican governor.

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10 hours ago, LM32 said:

Mr. Speaker, 

I motion for unanimous approval.

 

2 hours ago, Magenta said:

Mr. Speaker,

I object to the motion for unanimous consent.  I'm not sure it is the role of the federal government to intervene in this matter, as the land claims in dispute are between the state of New York and the Vermont Republic.  If the government of New York feels this is an appropriate course for the federal government to intervene upon, let their state legislature or similar representatives indicate such; but it is not our place to supercede their authority on the matter without that state's consent.  Further, the stipulations for negotiations presented in this act are vague and uncertain.  As many members of the New York state legislature are reported to have favored utilizing their state militia to outright annex the disputed lands, it seems hard to imagine they wish to negotiate any sort of settlement or compromise.  Better at this juncture to accept that New York's state government committed a diplomatic blunder, rather than compound that blunder with further federal escalation.

I yield.

 

Motion recognized. 

 

Objection Noted. 

 

Debate continues.

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Hands off Gavel

 

Mr. Speaker, 

 

The states do not have the unilateral authority to negotiate with foreign powers. Only Congress or the president  could authorize such a negotiation under the constitution and the separation of powers. The proposal fro the gentleman from North Carolina is unconstitutional and nonsensical. 

 

I yield

 

Takes back gavel

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Mr. Speaker,

I am not suggesting the state of New York should negotiate this matter, nor would I want them to do so.  That would likely lead to war, if their aggressive and belligerent tendencies were to be continued were they to negotiate.

Yet, there is nothing nonsensical about following proper procedure and adhering to the rule of law.  Hasty, excessive, and ill-considered actions has led to this situation wherein the Vermont Republic now seems opposed to joining this new nation, whereas it was assumed to be a forgone conclusion that they would join this nation and its government just a couple of years ago.  We must not confound the situation by repeating the mistakes of the New York state government.

To wit, as of now, I am unaware of the state of New York ceding its land claims to this federal government, it makes no sense to attempt to negotiate a compromise on behalf of a state government which has shown no inclination to compromise on the matter of their claims at this time.  To send a delegation with the purpose of compromise, when such negotiations could be thwarted due to intransigence of the New York assembly seems to be an exercise in time-wasting.  If the state of New York cedes their claims, if they are to recognize the bellicosity of their prior rhetoric, then perhaps we can pass an act more specific to this matter; but for now this proposed act of negotiation is too vague and possibly countermanded by the state of New York to be fruitful.

I yield.

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1 minute ago, Magenta said:

Mr. Speaker,

I am not suggesting the state of New York should negotiate this matter, nor would I want them to do so.  That would likely lead to war, if their aggressive and belligerent tendencies were to be continued were they to negotiate.

Yet, there is nothing nonsensical about following proper procedure and adhering to the rule of law.  Hasty, excessive, and ill-considered actions has led to this situation wherein the Vermont Republic now seems opposed to joining this new nation, whereas it was assumed to be a forgone conclusion that they would join this nation and its government just a couple of years ago.  We must not confound the situation by repeating the mistakes of the New York state government.

To wit, as of now, I am unaware of the state of New York ceding its land claims to this federal government, it makes no sense to attempt to negotiate a compromise on behalf of a state government which has shown no inclination to compromise on the matter of their claims at this time.  To send a delegation with the purpose of compromise, when such negotiations could be thwarted due to intransigence of the New York assembly seems to be an exercise in time-wasting.  If the state of New York cedes their claims, if they are to recognize the bellicosity of their prior rhetoric, then perhaps we can pass an act more specific to this matter; but for now this proposed act of negotiation is too vague and possibly countermanded by the state of New York to be fruitful.

I yield.

 

Hands off gavel

 

Mr. Speaker, 

 

The State of New York is not a sovereign country. No state is a sovereign country. We are no longer a confederation of private republics.......nay.....we are now the United States of America.....the constitution of which would forbid one state from negotiating on behalf of the federal government. 

 

I yield

 

Takes gavel once again

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Hands off gavel

 

Mr. Speaker, 

 

I move to table this unconstitutional bill

 

I yield

 

 

Takes gavel once again

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Mr. Speaker,

Perhaps the Speaker needs to acquaint himself with a hearing trumpet or bone conduction device.  I am going to reiterate: I am not suggesting, nor have I suggested, that the state of New York should negotiate with the Vermont Republic at any point in time.  I am stating that the federal government engaging in negotiations on matters related to New York's claims upon disputed lands when New York itself has not ceded such claims, nor shown any inclination towards ceding those claims, to the federal government, or any other entity, is unlikely to be beneficial.  If New York were to cede their claims, as was recently done in certain territories held by North Carolina, then perhaps, perhaps, a delegation would have the possibility of being fruitful.

As it stands, this act would treat New York as the quasi-sovereign nation (which the Speaker purports to object to) with the federal government negotiating a compromise between it and the Vermont Republic.  Let New York cede their claims of territory to the federal government, and then we can have a proper negotiation between the federal government and the government of the Vermont Republic regarding those claims.

I yield.

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Hands off gavel

 

Mr. Speaker, 

 

I thank the gentleman for clarifying. 

 

I yield

 

 

Takes gavel once again

Edited by Shiggy

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Hands off gavel

 

Mr. Speaker, 

 

For the record I agree that the matter and the land disputed should be handed over to the federal government in order to allow the federal government to negotiate with the sovereign republic of Vermont.

 

I yield

 

 

Takes gavel once again

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Mr. Speaker,

Does this act not allow for the Federal Government to negotiate with the sovereign Republic of Vermont? Section 2 of this bill clearly states that, therefore I see no problem with the bill being unconstitutional, as the Federal Government would be negotiating. 

I yield.

 

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Mr. Speaker,

I do not know if I would go so far as to say this bill is unconstitutional.  Certainly, the federal government can negotiate with the Vermont Republic about any number of issues, but I would reiterate my previous assertions that creating a diplomatic delegation and attempting any negotiations at this time is rather pointless due to New York's history and claims on the matter.  

I yield.

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Mr. Speaker, 

Currently a bill is being discussed in the New York Legislature considering releasing the claims to the US Government for financial compensation and a representative in the negotiations. I motion that this bill be put on hold until New York votes one way or the other.

I yield.

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