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CVAS Act

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Comprehensive Voter Accessibility and Security Act

Mr. Travere, for himself and others, submits the following bill

A BILL

To require a photo ID to vote and to provide citizens the means to obtain a valid ID and to register voters automatically

 

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE

This bill shall be cited as the Comprehensive Voter Accessibility and Security Act (CVAS Act)

 

SECTION 2. REQUIREMENT OF VOTER ID TO VOTE

  1. Except as otherwise provided in subsection (2), at each election, before being given a ballot, each registered elector offering to vote must identify himself or herself by presenting identification for election purposes, and by executing an application, on a form prescribed by the secretary of state, in the presence of an election official that includes all of the following:

    (a) The name of the elector.

    (b) The elector's address of residence.

    (c) The elector's date of birth.

    (d) An affirmative statement by the elector that is included in the signature statement indicating that he or she is a citizen of the United States.

    (e) The elector's signature or mark.

    2. If an elector's signature contained in the qualified voter file is available in the polling place, the election official shall compare the signature upon the application with the digitized signature provided by the qualified voter file. If an elector's signature is not contained in the qualified voter file, the election official shall process the application in the same manner as applications are processed when a voter registration list is used in the polling place. If voter registration lists are used in the precinct, the election inspector shall determine if the name on the application to vote appears on the voter registration list. If the name appears on the voter registration list, the elector shall provide further identification or other information stated upon the voter registration list. If the signature or an item of information does not correspond, the vote of the person must be challenged, and the same procedure must be followed as provided in this act for the challenging of an elector. If the elector does not have identification for election purposes as required under this section, the individual shall sign an affidavit to that effect before an election inspector and be allowed to vote as otherwise provided in this act. However, an elector being allowed to vote without identification for election purposes as required under this section is subject to challenge as provided in section 727.

    (3) If, upon a comparison of the signature or other identification as required in this section, it is found that the applicant is entitled to vote, the election officer having charge of the registration list shall approve the application and write his or her initials on the application, after which the number on the ballot issued must be noted on the application. The application serves as 1 of the 2 poll lists required to be kept as a record of a person who has voted. The application must be filed with the township, city, or village clerk. If voter registration cards are used in the precinct, the date of the election must be noted by 1 of the election officials upon the precinct registration card of each elector voting at an election. If voter registration lists are used in the precinct, the election official shall clearly indicate upon the list each elector voting at that election. The clerk of a city, village, or township shall maintain a record of voting participation for each registered elector.

 

SECTION 3. PROVIDING ID

  1. All department of motor vehicles locations within the region shall provide the proper facilities to issue government voter ID’s compliant with requirements stated in section

  2. The secretary of region’s office shall confirm the identity of an elector when issuing a government voter ID

  3. Government Voter ID’s shall be of no charge to an elector.

    1. The price of printing and issuing government voter ID’s shall be taken from the secretary of regions office

  4. All registered electors shall be eligible for a government voter ID

  5. Government Voter ID’s will be valid identifications for each general and primary election

 

SECTION 4. AUTOMATIC VOTER REGISTRATION

 The midwestern motor vehicle authority, shall transmit the identifying information to the appropriate Regional election official.

“(1) IDENTIFYING INFORMATION DESCRIBED.—The identifying information described in this paragraph with respect to any individual is as follows:

“(A) The individual’s legal name.

“(B) The individual’s age.

“(C) The individual’s residence.

 “(D) The individual’s citizenship status.

 “(E) The individual’s electronic signature.

“(2) RESTRICTION ON USE OF INFORMATION ON CITIZENSHIP STATUS.—The Midwest may not use any identifying information regarding an individual’s citizenship status which is transmitted under this subsection for any purpose other than determining whether the individual is eligible to vote in elections for Federal office.

“(b) Notification To Individuals.—Upon receiving the identifying information with respect to an individual under subsection (a), the appropriate State election official shall issue a notification to the individual containing—

“(1) a statement that, unless the individual notifies the election official prior to the expiration of the 21-calendar day period which begins on the date the official issued the notification that the individual declines to be registered to vote in elections for Federal office held in the State, the individual shall be considered to have completed and submitted a voter registration application for purposes of this Act; and

“(2) a description of the process by which the individual may decline to be registered to vote in elections for Federal office in this region.

“(c) Automatic Registration Of Eligible Individuals.—Upon the expiration of the 21-calendar day period which begins on the date the appropriate regional election official issues a notification to an individual under subsection (b)(1), the official shall ensure that the individual is registered to vote in elections for Federal and regional office held in the region unless—

“(1) the official determines that the individual does not meet the eligibility requirements for registering to vote in such elections;

“(2) prior to the expiration of such 21-calendar day period, the individual notifies the official that the individual declines to be registered to vote in such elections; or

“(3) the individual is already registered to vote in such elections.”.

 

SECTION 5. ENACTMENT

  1. This bill shall go into effect upon its passage

  2. This bill shall be in place for the 2020 general and primary elections

Edited by Magenta
Section 4 amended out

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(House Speaker)

Having been properly motioned and being within the three bills per week limit, this bill shall be immediately forward to the Floor for consideration. 

A reminder as we are at the being of the session: minimum of 72 hours shall be given for debate on a proposed bill, which may be extended by a majority vote via a motion in the legislature. A maximum of 48 hours, after the minimum amount of time for debate has passed, shall be given for the Governor and Regional Leader to submit the respective whips for their parties for any vote on a motion, bill, etc.

 

Please commence debate.

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Mr. Speaker, 

I object to  UC.

I also ask that estimated cost of printing these ID's before the majority takes the bill into consideration. If we are going to print free ID's for everyone who want's to vote, who doesn't already have one, it virtually means that a regional ID is free of charge to anyone here in the Midwest. I am not opposed to the idea of requiring ID's to vote, however I am concerned with the cost of free identification and I do not support automatic registration. There is nothing wrong with our current system of voter registration. It is free of charge and anyone who is eligible can register. There is no need for it. After receiving the costs, we will be offering an amendment to the bill, removing automatic registration. 

I yield. 

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Mr. Speaker,

Does the gentleman have a cost or is he going to ramble on? I want the cost. Period. 

I yield. 

  • Like 1

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Mr. Speaker,

This bill should have bi-partisan support. 80% of voters want voter ID, especially conservatives. And 65% want automatic registration, that includes 52% of republicans. The people want this bill and we should give it to them.

I yield

Edited by Dogslife

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Patricia Vanderbeak (R-MI)

Mr. Speaker,

There is merit in this legislation and there are some dismerits. On the whole, I am inclined to weigh the whole favorable. However, my deep reservations about the prospects of automatic registration. I agree with the notion of letting more people vote, yet we must be certain they are the ones actually voting. Automatic registration is simply a bridge too far, I'm afraid. I hereby motion to amend the bill by striking Section 4 from the proposed bill.

I yield.

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Mr. Speaker,

I understand the complaints about security and protection against fraud. That is why we also have the Voter ID in this bill. It lets many more people vote and also keeps elections secure. 

I cannot support this ammendment because I want it to be easier to people to vote legally. And as I said before, the overwhelming majority of people want this bill. And that includes a majority of republicans. This is bi-partisan. We shouldn’t be gutting it from this bill if the people want it.

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I yield

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Mr. Speaker,

The benefits of AVR go beyond just higher voter turnout, which is a really great thing, it can also lower costs of elections through getting rid of more costly provisional ballots. It will also help to keep voting rolls accurate with up-to-date addresses and the like. And when Delaware switches to AVR it was estimated that in just one year, $200,000 was saved in labor costs.

But we also cannot ignore the increased turnout, the Brennan Center for Justice estimates that 50 million new eligible voters would be able to vote. More voters means better democracy. Plain and simple.

This policy is bipartisan. The majority of Americans on both sides of the aisle want it, it can save money, it keeps voter rolls accurate, and it makes our democracy better by letting more people vote. 

I will be suggesting a level 3 nay on this ammendment because I think the people should have their voice listened too as well.

I yield

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Mr. Speaker, 

Why would the gentleman think that more people would turn out to vote? They are already eligible to vote, they just have chose not to register. If they don't even want to register, why would they show up to the polls? Let the people do as they please. Level 3 Aye on the amendment. 

I yield. 

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Mr. Speaker,

This is a good question, first off, let’s put my answer shortly, more people able to vote means more voters. That’s just common sense.

There are also statistics to help back up automatic voter registration. According to Pew Research Trusts, 62% of unregistered voters have never been asked to register. So they don’t know how to register or what to do. With AVR this will eliminate that aspect and have more of those newly-registered voters come to the polls.

According to that same study, 27% of unregistered voters have wanted to register but just haven’t gotten around to it. With AVR it makes it automatic and lets that large portion of the population vote. 9% also said that they don’t want to register because it’s not convenient. What’s more convenient then something that’s automatic? Another 6% said they haven’t registered because they don’t know how. If it’s automatic then they don’t need to know how, they’ll automatically be in the system. 

There are people who want to get registered but just don’t know how. These newly registered people turn into voters at the polls. These new voters make it so our elections are more representative. And this bill doesn’t force anyone to get out and vote. No it just puts them in a system for if they want to vote. So we should not get rid of the AVR from this bill and we should vote no on the ammendment because it can truly only do good things. The facts support AVR. There is nothing that supports getting rid of it.

I yield

Edited by Dogslife

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Mr. Speaker,

To continue, I would like to focus on the fact that AVR could save over 2 million dollars in our region through labor costs. This policy lets more people vote and it saves millions of dollars. If you want to save money and spend it on other things like education and transportation, then vote against this amendment that strips AVR from this bill. AVR will save over 2 million dollars, let more people vote, and will make sure our voter rolls are up to date and accurate. There truly is no downside to AVR and no reason to get rid of it. If you are worried about security, that's why this same bill we are debating has Voter ID, to keep elections secure. We can have both secure elections and elections with high voter turnout, this bill gives us exactly that. That is why I ask you all to vote no on this amendment and listen to your people, your wallets, and your love of democracy.

I yield.

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Mr. Speaker, 

Does the gentleman think people are stupid? Does he think they couldn't google search "how to register to vote?" Of course they can. It's not our job to force people to the polls like the gentleman's party does in Chicago. He wants them eligible so he can bus them to vote for him and his party. Leave this decision up to the people. Don't shove things down there throat. 

I yield. 

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Mr. Speaker,

Last time I checked, no where in this bill does it say someone has to vote. In actuality, this bill makes it so people can opt out of registering to vote if they do please. The majority leader can continue to make up lies about the bills I Introduce, or he could read them and see that

1, Nobody is being forced to vote

2, There is a process given to opt out of AVR

3, This is not just registering democrats, this is registering literally everyone no matter their political party.

The gentleman can lie all he wants about this bill but at the end of the day we can see that this bill is good. This bill lets everyone who wants to vote with no compulsory voting and makes is a process to opt out of AVR. It also saves the region millions of dollars while letting more people vote. The majority leader is just plain wrong about this entire bill. He is trying to lie to you to make you vote for the ammendment, if you want to save money and let more people vote then vote against this amendment. Vote against this amendment if you can see past the lies that the gentleman is saying. 

I yield

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Mr. Speaker,

I'm aware the bill doesn't force people to vote. It automatically registers them against their will. Even if they can opt out, we shouldn't be tampering with people's voter registration. If they want to register they will register. Plain and simple. We don't need people feeling like they are being taken advantage of by the governor by automatically placing them on the voter registration lists so they can be identified, harassed, and pressured into voting by Democrats every election cycle. Some people just want to be left alone. They will register and vote on their own accord. 

I sincerely hope my republican colleagues vote for the amendment removing this section of the bill. I suppose the sponsor will the pull it from the floor after that happens. 

I yield. 

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Mr. speaker,

If they don’t want to be on the list, they don’t have to. For those people who haven’t had the time to register or don’t know how but they still want to vote, this bill is for them. It will let them get registered and let them vote. There are millions of people who want to register but haven’t gotten around to it. For those people who don’t want to register they truly just don’t have to. They can say, “no thank you I don’t want to be registered” and boom, they aren’t. There are more people that want to register that haven’t then there are people who just don’t want to register. This bill helps both of those groups. We should vote against the amendment because frankly, every argument in favor of it has been shut down by facts. The majority leader is trying to scare people into voting for the ammendment because he doesn’t want more people voting. If you vote against this amendment then you want more Americans voting securely, if you vote for it, you want to have a barricade in our fellow Americans path to democracy.

I yield

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Mr. Speaker. 

It is not giving people a choice when they have to opt OUT of something. The choice should be to opt in. We already have that. People can register during early voting, AND on election day. They don't even have to make two trips. They can do this if they so choose. I'm not going to force people into something and THEN give them a choice to opt OUT. That's asinine. 

I yield. 

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