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Paul Vang

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Paul Vang last won the day on October 18

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  1. Paul Vang

    FAMILY Act

    Mr. Speaker, I question the claim made by the gentleman from New York on the self funding nature of this bill. The cost of a paid family leave program depends primarily on how many workers actually take paid time off and for how long. According to the American Action Forum it would cost anywhere between $159.6 billion to $997.4 billion a year to provide 12 weeks of paid family leave nationwide. Additionally the funding mechanism of the bill would only generate around $30.6 billion in revenue. That's 19.2% of the lower bound estimate and just 3.1% of the upper bound estimate. Put another way, at a 16% take-up rate workers would only receive an average leave of only 2.3 weeks, much shorter than promised. Even with their lower bound estimate over the course of ten years the deficit increase would be some $1.3 trillion dollars and it could be potentially much greater. This new entitlement like most entitlements is going to be extremely costly and the gross burden of debt it would pass along to future generations does not justify it. I yield.
  2. Paul Vang

    Vang on Election Integrity Act

    Paul Vang From the Office of Representative Paul Vang 80% of Americans support requiring all Americans to provide photo identification at their voting place in order to vote. Broken down, that number is 95% of Republicans, 83% of independents, and 63% of Democrats. Giving peace of mind to the American public in the democratic process is long overdue and will be remedied by my bill, the Election Integrity Act which will institute voter ID laws nationally. This action is common sense and common place in modern democracies. Just look to our neighbors to the North and the South for that. The vocal partisan fringe opposition to what most Americans want will justify themselves by saying voter impersonation is rare, despite the caveat that as it stands there is no audit process that exists to catch cases of voter impersonation. They'll cry voter suppression despite the Supreme Court already ruling on the matter 6-3 with a decision written by liberal favorite John Paul Stevens. In that decision, it was declared voter ID laws do not constitute an undue burden on people attempting to vote. They'll never listen to the people they claim to serve, but we shouldn't listen to them and instead work to give our elections needed integrity ahead of the 2020 elections. I hope that the next Speaker of the House strongly considered listening to what the public wants and puts the Election Integrity Act up for debate on the House floor. View full PR
  3. From the Office of Representative Paul Vang 80% of Americans support requiring all Americans to provide photo identification at their voting place in order to vote. Broken down, that number is 95% of Republicans, 83% of independents, and 63% of Democrats. Giving peace of mind to the American public in the democratic process is long overdue and will be remedied by my bill, the Election Integrity Act which will institute voter ID laws nationally. This action is common sense and common place in modern democracies. Just look to our neighbors to the North and the South for that. The vocal partisan fringe opposition to what most Americans want will justify themselves by saying voter impersonation is rare, despite the caveat that as it stands there is no audit process that exists to catch cases of voter impersonation. They'll cry voter suppression despite the Supreme Court already ruling on the matter 6-3 with a decision written by liberal favorite John Paul Stevens. In that decision, it was declared voter ID laws do not constitute an undue burden on people attempting to vote. They'll never listen to the people they claim to serve, but we shouldn't listen to them and instead work to give our elections needed integrity ahead of the 2020 elections. I hope that the next Speaker of the House strongly considered listening to what the public wants and puts the Election Integrity Act up for debate on the House floor.
  4. Paul Vang

    @PaulVang

    @realDonaldTrump has called for addressing America's infrastructure time and time again. I agree, we need to act now and the Rebuilding America's Infrastructure Act will get that done big league.
  5. Paul Vang From the Office of Representative Paul Vang Infrastructure is the backbone of the U.S. economy and a necessary input to every economic output. It is critical to the nation’s prosperity and the public’s health and welfare. Infrastructure’s condition has a cascading impact on our nation’s economy, impacting business productivity, gross domestic product, employment, personal income, and international competitiveness. According to the experts at the American Society of Civil Engineers, America has been neglecting the needed investment in infrastructure spending only half of what's needed to maintain a state of good repair. This investment gap has grave consequences outlined very starkly in their Failure to Act 2016 study. If the investment is not resolved soon then by 2025 the US economy will lost roughly $4 trillion in GDP, $7 trillion in lost business sales, and some 2.5 million jobs. By 2040 those numbers rise to $14.2 trillion lost in GDP, $29.2 trillion in business sales, and 5.8 million jobs if current trends continue. The impact will be felt by American families greatly to the tune of roughly $3,400 a year. That's felt in many different ways too. Poor roads and airports mean travel times increase. An aging electrical grid and inadequate water distribution makes utilities unreliable. Problems like these translate into higher costs for businesses to manufacture and distribute goods and provide services which is passed along to workers and families. The infrastructure investment gap cannot be another can kicked down the road and my bill the Rebuilding America's Infrastructure Act closes that gap across all aspects of infrastructure in the country. The bill gives expert recommended levels of funding in almost every different aspect of American infrastructure. It addresses aviation, dams, energy, inland waterways, ports, rail, schools, solid waste, bridges, drinking water, hazardous waste, levees, public parks, roads, transit, and waste water all with the needed nuance to each individual category to get our infrastructure back on track. We shouldn't be tolerating year after year D+ grades when the public deserves the very best. The best part of all though is that the bill will not have an impact on the deficit. It's paid for by going after the leeches in our American system. Big companies like Amazon and Walmart are making more money than ever since the tax cuts but they still have far too many employees receiving public assistance. It's time they made a positive contribution to society that will benefit us all rather than exploit the public forcing them to subsidizing their low wages. They'll benefit from the infrastructure improvements in business activity anyways. It's also paid for by going after tax haven cheats and eliminating the widely exploited carried interest loophole. Cronyism needs to end, and it's going to be made to pay for our brighter future in the form of this bill. With $11 trillion in economic activity on the line we cannot afford to let such an opportunity to pass such groundbreaking legislation such as the Rebuilding America's Infrastructure Act go by. I hope whoever it is that is the next Speaker of the House strongly consider putting the bill on their first House docket and we can make history together. View full PR
  6. From the Office of Representative Paul Vang Infrastructure is the backbone of the U.S. economy and a necessary input to every economic output. It is critical to the nation’s prosperity and the public’s health and welfare. Infrastructure’s condition has a cascading impact on our nation’s economy, impacting business productivity, gross domestic product, employment, personal income, and international competitiveness. According to the experts at the American Society of Civil Engineers, America has been neglecting the needed investment in infrastructure spending only half of what's needed to maintain a state of good repair. This investment gap has grave consequences outlined very starkly in their Failure to Act 2016 study. If the investment is not resolved soon then by 2025 the US economy will lost roughly $4 trillion in GDP, $7 trillion in lost business sales, and some 2.5 million jobs. By 2040 those numbers rise to $14.2 trillion lost in GDP, $29.2 trillion in business sales, and 5.8 million jobs if current trends continue. The impact will be felt by American families greatly to the tune of roughly $3,400 a year. That's felt in many different ways too. Poor roads and airports mean travel times increase. An aging electrical grid and inadequate water distribution makes utilities unreliable. Problems like these translate into higher costs for businesses to manufacture and distribute goods and provide services which is passed along to workers and families. The infrastructure investment gap cannot be another can kicked down the road and my bill the Rebuilding America's Infrastructure Act closes that gap across all aspects of infrastructure in the country. The bill gives expert recommended levels of funding in almost every different aspect of American infrastructure. It addresses aviation, dams, energy, inland waterways, ports, rail, schools, solid waste, bridges, drinking water, hazardous waste, levees, public parks, roads, transit, and waste water all with the needed nuance to each individual category to get our infrastructure back on track. We shouldn't be tolerating year after year D+ grades when the public deserves the very best. The best part of all though is that the bill will not have an impact on the deficit. It's paid for by going after the leeches in our American system. Big companies like Amazon and Walmart are making more money than ever since the tax cuts but they still have far too many employees receiving public assistance. It's time they made a positive contribution to society that will benefit us all rather than exploit the public forcing them to subsidizing their low wages. They'll benefit from the infrastructure improvements in business activity anyways. It's also paid for by going after tax haven cheats and eliminating the widely exploited carried interest loophole. Cronyism needs to end, and it's going to be made to pay for our brighter future in the form of this bill. With $11 trillion in economic activity on the line we cannot afford to let such an opportunity to pass such groundbreaking legislation such as the Rebuilding America's Infrastructure Act go by. I hope whoever it is that is the next Speaker of the House strongly consider putting the bill on their first House docket and we can make history together.
  7. Mr. Vang, for himself, submits A BILL To rebuild America's infrastructure. SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. (a) This act shall be cited as the Rebuilding America's Infrastructure Act SECTION 2. FINDINGS. (a) The ASCE Foundation which has given infrastructure report cards since 1988 has given the United States a grade of D+ as of 2017. (b) According to ASCE's 2016 Failure to Act study, failing to close the infrastructure investment gap will result in $3.9 trillion in losses to the U.S. GDP, $7 trillion in lost business sales, and 2.5 million lost American jobs by the year 2025. (c) Additionally the study found that due to funding gaps in infrastructure American families will lose upwards of $3,400 in disposable income each year, or $9 each day. SECTION 3. AVIATION. (a) $42 billion is appropriated to the Airport Improvement Program through the Airport and Airway Trust Fund. SECTION 4. DAMS. (a) $4 billion is appropriated to the National Dam Rehabilitation and Repair Funding Program to cost-share repairs to publicly owned, non-federal, and high-hazard potential dams. (b) The Federal Emergency Management Agency is tasked with developing emergency action plans for every high-hazard potential dam by 2021 SECTION 5. ELECTRICITY (a) $177 billion is appropriated to the Department of Energy to be granted out to the states on a per capita basis for electrical infrastructure improvements, repairs, and maintenance. SECTION 6. INLAND WATERWAYS (a) $5 billion is appropriated to the Inland Waterways Trust Fund. (b) The United States Army Corps of Engineers is given contract authority for inland waterway projects. SECTION 7. PORTS. (a) $10 billion is appropriated to the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery competitive grant program to be used exclusively for federal port investment. (b) $5 billion is appropriated to the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund. (c) All funds in the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund shall be limited exclusively for the dredging of harbors. SECTION 8. RAIL. (a) $20 billion is appropriated to the FASTLANE grant program exclusively to be used for freight rail infrastructure improvement with priority towards Class I railroads, upgrading tracks to support 286,000 pound cars, and repairing and replacing aging bridges. (b) The Railroad Track Maintenance Tax Credit is indefinitely extended. (c) $28 billion is appropriated to the Department of Transportation to be loaned to Amtrak for the purpose of infrastructure repairs needed for the Northeast Corridor. SECTION 9. SCHOOLS. (a) $662 billion shall be appropriated to the Department of Education to be granted on to the states on a per capita basis to be used towards school infrastructure improvement, repairs, and maintenance. SECTION 10. BRIDGES. (a) $123 billion is appropriated to the Department of Transportation to be granted out to the states on a per capita basis for the purpose of bridge rehabilitation. (b) Full funding for the Fixing America's Surface Transportation Act is indefinitely extended. SECTION 11. DRINKING WATER. (a) $105 billion is appropriated to the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund. (b) Full funding for the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act is indefinitely extended. (c) The state cap on private activity bonds for water infrastructure projects is eliminated. SECTION 12. HAZARDOUS WASTE. (a) $3 billion is appropriated to the Environmental Protection Agency Superfund. SECTION 13. LEVEES (a) $40 billion is appropriated to the US Army Corps of Engineers for the maintenance and improvement of USACE-owned levees. (b) $40 billion is appropriated to the Department of the Interior to grant out on a per capita basis to the states for the purpose of maintenance and improvement of non-USACE levees. (b) Full funding for the National Levee Safety Initiative under the Water Resources Reform and Development Act that is indefinitely extended. (c) The Federal Emergency Management Agency is tasked with completing the National Levee Inventory for both federal and non-federal levees by 2020. (d) The Federal Emergency Management Agency is tasked with adopting a levee hazard classification system. SECTION 14. PUBLIC PARKS. (a) $11.9 billion is appropriated to the National Park Service to address deferred maintenance. (b) $5.1 billion is appropriated to the United States Forest Service to address deferred maintenance. (c) $95.3 billion is appropriated to the Department of the Interior to grant out to the states on a per capita basis for the purpose of addressing deferred maintenance on state owned parks. (b) The US Army Corps of Engineers are permitted to retain all collected recreation fees for use at its facilities. (c) Reauthorize and fully fund indefinitely the Land and Water Conservation Fund. SECTION 15. ROADS. (a) $836 billion is appropriated to the Federal Highway Trust Fund. (b) To ensure solvency of the Federal Highway Trust Fund, the taxes on gasoline and diesel are indexed to inflation, from 18.4 cents per gallon of gasoline to 25.76 cents and 24.4 cents per gallon of diesel to 34.16 cents. SECTION 16. TRANSIT. (a) $90 billion is appropriated to the Department of Transportation to address the current transit maintenance backlog needed to attain “state of good repair” status. SECTION 17. WASTERWATER. (a) Reauthorize at minimum federal funding of $20 billion over five years for the State Revolving Loan Fund under the Clean Water Act. (b) Fully fund indefinitely the Water Infrastructure Financing and Innovation Act. SECTION 18. TAX-EXEMPT BONDS. (c) The status of tax-exempt bonds are preserved. SECTION 19. APPROPRIATION DISBURSEMENT. (a) All stated amounts above of appropriation shall be disbursed equally over the course of the next ten fiscal years. SECTION. 20. TAX ON EMPLOYERS WITH EMPLOYEES RECEIVING CERTAIN FEDERAL BENEFITS. (a) In General.—The Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by inserting after chapter 36 the following new chapter: “CHAPTER 37—EMPLOYERS WITH EMPLOYEES RECEIVING CERTAIN FEDERAL BENEFITS “SEC. 4501. EMPLOYERS WITH EMPLOYEES RECEIVING CERTAIN FEDERAL BENEFITS. “(a) Imposition Of Corporate Welfare Tax.—There is hereby imposed on each large employer a tax equal to 100 percent of the qualified employee benefits with respect to such employer for the taxable year. “(b) Large Employer.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—For purposes of this section, the term ‘large employer’ means, with respect to a calendar year, an employer who employed an average of at least 500 employees on business days during the preceding calendar year. “(2) RULES FOR DETERMINING EMPLOYER SIZE.—For purposes of this subsection: “(A) APPLICATION OF AGGREGATION RULE FOR EMPLOYERS.—All persons treated as a single employer under subsection (b), (c), (m), or (o) of section 414 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 shall be treated as 1 employer. “(B) EMPLOYERS NOT IN EXISTENCE IN PRECEDING YEAR.—In the case of an employer which was not in existence throughout the preceding calendar year, the determination of whether such employer is a large employer shall be based on the average number of employees that it is reasonably expected such employer will employ on business days in the current calendar year. “(C) PREDECESSORS.—Any reference in this subsection to an employer shall include a reference to any predecessor of such employer. “(c) Qualified Employee Benefits.—For purposes of this section: “(1) IN GENERAL.—The term ‘qualified employee benefits’ means, with respect to a person for a taxable year, the sum of the qualified Federal benefits received by individuals who are employees of such person for such taxable year. “(2) QUALIFIED FEDERAL BENEFITS.—The term ‘qualified Federal benefits’ means, with respect to an individual, the following: “(A) The dollar value of supplemental nutrition assistance for which the household (as defined in section 3(m) of the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008) that includes such individual is eligible. “(B) The dollar value of meals that such individual or dependents of such individual are eligible for under the school lunch program under the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act and the school breakfast program under section 4 of the Child Nutrition Act of 1966. “(C) The aggregate amount of the monthly assistance payments for rental of a dwelling unit that the household of such individual is a member of is eligible to have made on its behalf pursuant to section 8 of the United States Housing Act of 1937. “(D) The amount of payments made under section 1903 of the Social Security Act with respect to expenditures made by a State under a State Medicaid plan under title XIX of such Act (or a waiver of such plan) for medical assistance for such individual or for dependents of such individual. “(d) Employee.—For purposes of this section, the term ‘employee’ means— “(1) any full-time or part-time employee, “(2) any individual who is a full-time or part-time independent contractor (including any employee of such independent contractor) and provides services to the employer, unless— “(A) the individual is free from control and direction in connection with the performance of the service, both under the contract for the performance of service and in fact, “(B) the service is performed outside the usual course of the business of the employer, and “(C) the individual is customarily engaged in an independently established trade, occupation, profession, or business of the same nature as that involved in the service performed, and “(3) any individual who is a full-time or part-time joint employee, provided that the employer possess, reserves, or exercises sufficient direct or indirect control over the essential terms and conditions of employment of such employee. “(e) Regulations.—The Secretary, in consultation with the Secretary of Agriculture, the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, and the Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, shall prescribe such regulations as may be necessary or appropriate to carry out this chapter.”. (b) Clerical Amendments.—The table of chapters for subtitle D of such Code is amended by inserting after the item relating to chapter 36 the following new item: “CHAPTER 37—EMPLOYERS WITH EMPLOYEES RECEIVING CERTAIN FEDERAL BENEFITS”. (c) Effective Date.—The amendments made by this Act apply with respect to taxable years beginning after December 31, 2018. SEC. 3. UNLAWFUL EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES RELATED TO FEDERAL BENEFITS OF APPLICANTS. (a) In General.—It shall be an unlawful employment practice for any large employer (as defined in section 4501(b) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986) to make inquiries of an applicant for employment, or otherwise seek information about such an applicant (including through the use of any form or application), relating to whether such applicant receives Federal benefits. (b) Enforcement.—A violation of subsection (a) shall be treated as, and enforced by the Secretary of Labor in the same manner as, a violation of section 6 of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (29 U.S.C. 206), except that for purposes of section 15(b) of such Act (29 U.S.C. 215(b)), the employer shall be liable to the individual alleging the violation for any lost wages due the individual and an additional equal amount of liquidated damages. SECTION. 22. ENDING TAX HAVEN ABUSE. (a) The Department of the Treasury shall be authorized to impose restrictions on foreign jurisdictions or financial institutions operating in the United States that are of primary money laundering concern or that significantly impede U.S. tax enforcement. (b) Title 26 of the United States Code (the Internal Revenue Code) shall be amended to: (1) Authorize the Department of the Treasury to expand reporting requirements for U.S. persons who hold an interest in a passive foreign investment company; (2) establish a rebuttable presumption against the validity of transactions by institutions that do not comply with reporting requirements under the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act; (3) treat foreign corporations managed and controlled primarily in the United States as domestic corporations for tax purposes; (4) require tax withholding agents and financial institutions to report certain information about beneficial owners of foreign-owned financial accounts; (5) treat swap payments sent offshore as taxable U.S. source income; and (6) Authorize the Department of the Treasury to impose additional requirements for third party summonses used to obtain information in tax investigations that do not identify the person with respect to whose liability the summons is issued (i.e., John Doe summons). (c) The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 shall be amended to: (1) require corporations registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission to report annually, on a country-by country basis, on employees, gross revenues, payments made to governments, and other financial information; and (2) impose a fine for failure to disclose any holdings or transactions involving equity or debt instruments known to involve a foreign entity that would otherwise be subject to disclosure requirements. (d) Investment advisers and persons engaged in forming new business entities shall hereby subject to all current anti-money laundering requirements and laws. (e) The Department of the Treasury shall be authorized to impose new restrictions on U.S. corporations and other entities with foreign income with respect to: (1) tax deductions allocable to deferred foreign income, (2) the recalculation of foreign income taxes, (3) intangible property transferred overseas, (4) tax evasion activities by U.S. corporations reincorporating in a foreign country, and (5) the interest expense tax deduction of certain subsidiaries of foreign corporations with excess domestic indebtedness in order to prevent such deductions from being considered to drastically reduce tax income owed to the United States. (f) The rules on taxation of inverted entities (i.e., U.S. corporations that acquire foreign companies to reincorporate in a foreign jurisdiction with income tax rates lower than the United States) shall be amended to provide that a foreign corporation that acquires the properties of a U.S. corporation or partnership after the date of passage of this Act shall be treated as an inverted corporation and thus subject to U.S. taxation if, after such acquisition: (1) it holds more than 50% of the stock of the new entity (expanded affiliated group), or (2) the management or control of the new entity occurs primarily within the United States and the new entity has significant domestic business activities. SECTION 23. CLOSING CARRIED INTEREST LOOPHOLE. (a) Beginning in the year following the enactment of this act, carried interest shall be taxed according to existing laws pertaining to income taxation SECTION 24. ENACTMENT. (a) Unless otherwise stated, this act shall take effect immediately.
  8. Paul Vang

    Experience 1

  9. Paul Vang

    Name Recognition 2

  10. Paul Vang

    @PaulVang

    Official social media of Representative Paul Vang
  11. Paul Vang

    Name Recognition 1

    Updated it
  12. Paul Vang

    Ending Family Separations Act

    IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Mr. Vang (For himself, with thanks to Mr. Cruz) introduced the following bill; A BILL To limit the separation of families seeking asylum in the United States and expedite the asylum process for individuals arriving in the United States with children Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Ending Family Separations Act”. SEC. 2. ENSURING FAMILIES REMAIN TOGETHER. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, judicial determination, consent decree, or settlement agreement: (a) A child shall remain in the custody of and be detained in the same facility as the Asylum Applicant who is the child’s parent or legal guardian during the pendency of the Asylum Applicant’s asylum or withholding of removal proceedings. (b) If a child has multiple parents or legal guardians who are Asylum Applicants, that child shall remain in the custody of and be detained in the same facility as all of the child’s parents and legal guardians during the pendency of the Asylum Applicants’ asylum or withholding of removal proceedings; unless one of the child’s parents or legal guardians is present in the United States and not in any form of detention, in which case the child shall be placed in the custody of that parent or legal guardian. SEC. 3. FACILITIES FOR ASYLUM APPLICANTS WHO RETAIN CUSTODY OF A CHILD. (a) The designated agencies shall maintain facilities for the joint detention of Asylum Applicants who retain custody of a child and the child. These facilities shall only contain individuals who are under the age of 18 or are the parents or legal guardians of individuals under the age of 18. (b) Funding.—There are authorized to be appropriated for each of fiscal years 2017, 2018, 2019, and 2020 such sums as may be necessary to carry out this section. SEC. 4. INCREASING THE NUMBER OF AUTHORIZED IMMIGRATION JUDGES. (a) Increase In Immigration Judges.—The Attorney General of the United States shall increase the total number of immigration judges to adjudicate pending cases and efficiently process future cases by 375 judges. (b) Necessary Support Staff For Immigration Judges.—To address the shortage of support staff for immigration judges, the Attorney General shall ensure that each immigration judge has sufficient support staff, adequate technological and security resources, and appropriate courtroom facilities. (c) Increase In Board Of Immigration Appeals Attorneys.—The Attorney General shall increase the number of Board of Immigration Appeals staff attorneys by sixty attorneys. (d) Necessary Support Staff For Board Of Immigration Appeals.—To address the shortage of support staff for the Board of Immigration appeals, the Attorney General shall ensure that the Board of Immigration Appeals and its staff attorneys has sufficient support staff and adequate technological and security resources. (e) Prioritization Of Asylum Applicants.—Any immigration judges, Board of Immigration Appeals staff attorneys, and support staff hired under the authority of this section shall prioritize asylum applications that are filed by Asylum Applicants. (f) Funding.—There are authorized to be appropriated for each of fiscal years 2019, 2020, and 2021 such sums as may be necessary to carry out this section. SEC. 5. INCREASING THE NUMBER OF AVAILABLE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY EMPLOYEES. (a) Increase In Department Of Homeland Security Personnel.—The Secretary of Homeland Security shall increase the total number of Department personnel that are responsible for processing asylum applications filed by Asylum Applicants by 200 individuals. Positions authorized before the date of the enactment of this Act and any existing officer vacancies within the Department of Homeland Security on such date of enactment shall not count towards the increase mandated by this paragraph. (b) Increase In Department Of Homeland Security Personnel.—The Secretary is authorized to procure space, temporary facilities, and to hire the required administrative and legal support staff, on an expedited basis, to accommodate the additional positions authorized under this section. (c) Funding.—There are authorized to be appropriated for each of fiscal years 2019, 2020, and 2021 such sums as may be necessary to carry out this section. SEC. 6. ESTABLISHING DEADLINES FOR PROCESSING OF ASYLUM APPLICANTS. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, judicial determination, consent decree, or settlement agreement: (a) In General.— (1) The Attorney General and Secretary of Homeland Security shall establish within 60 days of the enactment of this Act procedures for the expedited consideration of asylum applications filed by Asylum Applicants, pursuant to the guidelines set forth in this Act. (2) An asylum application filed by Asylum Applicants must be governed by the expedited procedures set forth by this Act, as opposed to existing asylum law, procedures, regulations, and timelines. But unless modified by this Act or the procedures set forth in, regulations promulgated pursuant to, and timelines established by this Act, the standards, procedures, and burdens of proof established by existing law and regulations for asylum applications shall apply to an asylum application filed by an Asylum Applicant. (3) Until the Attorney General and Secretary of Homeland Security have established procedures for expedited consideration of asylum applications under this section, any asylum application filed by an Asylum Applicant shall be reviewed under existing law, regulations, and procedures for the evaluation of an asylum claim. Other sections of this Act, including sections 2, 3, and 8, will nonetheless begin to apply to Asylum Applicants upon enactment of this Act. (b) Asylum Interviews.— (1) Within 24 hours of an initial referral from immigration officials of an asylum application by an Asylum Applicant, an asylum officer shall conduct an asylum interview of the Asylum Applicant. (2) The Attorney General shall provide information concerning the asylum interview described in this section to Asylum Applicants at least twelve hours prior to the asylum interview. An Asylum Applicant may consult with a person or persons of the Asylum Applicant’s choosing prior to the interview or any review thereof, according to regulations prescribed by the Attorney General. Such consultation shall be at no expense to the Government and shall not unreasonably delay the process. (3) Within 24 hours of the start of an asylum interview, the asylum officer must make a determination of whether the Asylum Application has a credible fear of persecution. (4) If the officer determines that the Asylum Applicant has a credible fear of persecution, the Asylum Applicant shall be detained for further consideration of the application for asylum and referred for an asylum determination consistent with subsection (d). (5) If the officer determines that the Asylum Applicant does not have a credible fear of persecution, the Asylum Applicant has 24 hours to request review by an Immigration Judge. If the Asylum Applicant does not request review of the determination within that time period, a Final Order of Removal shall be issued. (6) The asylum officer shall prepare a written record of a determination that the Asylum Applicant does not have a credible fear of persecution. Such record shall include a summary of the material facts as stated by the Asylum Applicant, such additional facts (if any) relied upon by the officer, and the officer’s analysis of why, in the light of such facts, the Asylum Applicant has not established a credible fear of persecution. A copy of the officer’s interview notes shall be attached to the written summary. (c) Appearance Before Immigration Judge.— (1) In the case of an Asylum Applicant referred to an Immigration Judge following a determination of credible fear of persecution by the asylum officer or an Asylum Applicant who requests review by an Immigration Judge of a determination that the Asylum Applicant does not have a credible fear of persecution, the Attorney General shall present the Asylum Applicant before an immigration judge for a hearing within 24 hours of the referral or request. (2) The Immigration Judge shall make a determination of asylum or withholding of removal eligibility within 120 hours of such a hearing. (3) If the Immigration Judge determines the Asylum Applicant is eligible for asylum or withholding of removal, the judge will order that asylum or withholding of removal be granted. (4) If the Immigration Judge determines that the Asylum Applicant is not eligible for asylum or withholding of removal, the Asylum Applicant has 24 hours to request review by the Board of Immigration Appeals. If the Asylum Applicant does not request review of the determination within that time period, a Final Order of Removal will be issued. (5) The Immigration Judge shall prepare a written record of a determination that the Asylum Applicant is not eligible for asylum or withholding of removal. Such record shall include a summary of the material facts as stated by the Asylum Applicant, such additional facts (if any) relied upon by the Immigration Judge, and the Immigration Judge’s analysis of why, in the light of such facts, the Asylum Applicant has not established eligibility for asylum or withholding of removal. (d) Review By Board Of Immigration Appeals.— (1) In the case of an Asylum Applicant who requests review by the Board of Immigration Appeals of a determination by an Immigration Judge that he or she is not eligible for asylum or withholding of removal, the Attorney General shall present the request for review to the Board of Immigration Appeals within 24 hours of the request. (2) The Board of Immigration Appeals shall make a determination of asylum or withholding of removal eligibility within 24 hours of receiving the request. (3) If the Board of Immigration Appeals determines the Asylum Applicant is eligible for asylum or withholding of removal, the Board of Immigration Appeals will order that asylum or withholding of removal be granted. (4) If the Board of Immigration Appeals determines that the Asylum Applicant is not eligible for asylum or withholding of removal, the Asylum Applicant has 24 hours to request review by the Attorney General. If the Asylum Applicant does not request review of the determination within that time period, a Final Order of Removal will be issued. (e) Review By Attorney General.— (1) In the case of an Asylum Applicant who requests review by the Attorney General of a determination by the Board of Immigration Appeals that he or she is not eligible for asylum or withholding of removal, the Attorney General shall make a determination of asylum or withholding of removal eligibility within 24 hours of receiving the request. (2) If the Attorney General determines the Asylum Applicant is eligible for asylum or withholding of removal, the Attorney General will order that asylum be granted. (3) If the Attorney General determines that the Asylum Applicant is not eligible for asylum or withholding of removal, a Final Order of Removal will be issued. (f) Issuance Of Final Order Of Removal.—Following a determination by the Attorney General that the Asylum Applicant is not eligible for asylum or withholding of removal, there shall be no additional review prior to the issuance of a Final Order of Removal. (g) Grant Of Asylum.—If asylum or withholding of removal is granted to an Asylum Applicant pursuant to these expedited procedures, the grant will be conditional and the Asylum Applicant shall remain in detention until the identity of the applicant has been checked against all appropriate records or databases maintained by the Attorney General and by the Secretary of State, including the Automated Visa Lookout System, to determine any grounds on which the alien may be inadmissible to, excludable from, removable from, or deportable from the United States, or ineligible to apply for or be granted asylum or withholding of removal. (h) Extensions Of Deadlines On Behalf Of Designated Agencies.—A designated agency may seek an extension of any of the deadlines set forth in this subsection by applying for an extension with an Immigration Judge. The Immigration Judge must issue an order stating that the designated agency has established that good cause warrants the granting of an extension. An extension may be granted for up to thirty days. Only two extensions may be granted, in total, to a designated agency during the entirety of an Asylum Applicant’s asylum application process. Any extensions of the deadlines shall not affect the detention of the Asylum Applicant. (i) Extensions Of Deadlines On Behalf Of Asylum Applicants.—An Asylum Applicant may seek an extension of any of the deadlines set forth in this subsection by applying for an extension with an Immigration Judge. The Immigration Judge must issue an order stating that the Asylum Applicant has established that good cause warrants the granting of an extension. An extension may be granted for up to thirty days. Only two extensions may be granted, in total, to an Asylum Applicant during the entirety of the Asylum Applicant’s asylum application process. Any extensions of the deadlines shall not affect the detention of the Asylum Applicant. SEC. 7. CONSEQUENCES OF DENIAL OF ASYLUM APPLICATION. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, judicial determination, consent decree, or settlement agreement: (a) Once a Final Order of Removal for an Asylum Applicant is issued, the designated agency shall remove from the United States within four days the Asylum Applicant and any child for whom the Asylum Applicant is the parent or legal guardian and has been detained with the Asylum Applicant. (1) EXCEPTION.—If the child has a parent or legal guardian who will be remaining physically present in the United States when the Asylum Applicant is removed, the child will remain in or be placed in the custody of that parent or legal guardian. (b) An Asylum Applicant whose asylum application is denied pursuant to the process outlined in this Act shall not be prosecuted for illegal entry as a result of the entry into the United States that led to the filing of the asylum application adjudicated under the process outlined in this Act, but will instead be removed from the United States. An Asylum Applicant may be prosecuted for any other violation of the law if and once their asylum application has been denied. If the Asylum Applicant is prosecuted for an immigration crime that is not a crime of violence, the provisions of this Act that require that a child shall remain in the custody of and be detained in the same facility as the Asylum Applicant, and any other exceptions and requirements thereof set forth in this Act, shall continue to apply. (c) A denial of an asylum application pursuant to the process outlined in this Act shall not prejudice a subsequent asylum application by the same Asylum Applicant on the same grounds if it is later filed after the Asylum Applicant arrives at a legal port of entry and files an asylum application, unless it is determined that the Asylum Applicant engaged in fraud during his prior asylum application that was denied pursuant to the process outlined in this Act. SEC. 8. EXCEPTIONS TO ENSURING FAMILIES REMAIN TOGETHER. (a) An agent or officer of a designated agency shall be permitted to remove a child from the custody of an Asylum Applicant that is the child’s parent or legal guardian with that Asylum Applicant’s consent. If a child has multiple parents or legal guardians in detention, all parents or legal guardians with custody of the child must consent to have the child removed from their custody before an agent or officer of a designated agency is permitted to remove the child; otherwise, the child will remain with the parent or legal guardian who does not wish for the child to be removed. (b) An agent or officer of a designated agency shall be permitted to remove a child from the custody of an Asylum Applicant without that Asylum Applicant’s consent if the following has occurred: (1) A State court, authorized under State law, terminates the rights of a parent or legal guardian, determines that it is in the best interests of the child to be removed from his or her parent or legal guardian, in accordance with the Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997 (Public Law 105–89), or makes any similar determination that is legally authorized under State law. (2) An official from the State or county child welfare agency with expertise in child trauma and development makes a best interests determination that it is in the best interests of the child to be removed from his or her parent or legal guardian because the child is in danger of abuse or neglect at the hands of the parent or legal guardian, or is a danger to herself or others. (3) The Chief Patrol Agent or the Area Port Director, or their designees, authorizes separation upon the recommendation by an agent or officer, based on a finding that— (A) the child is a victim of trafficking or is at significant risk of becoming a victim of trafficking; (B) there is a strong likelihood that the adult is not the parent or legal guardian of the child; or (C) the child is in danger of abuse or neglect at the hands of the parent or legal guardian, or is a danger to themselves or others. (c) Documentation Required.—The Secretary shall ensure that a separation under subsection (a)(3) is documented in writing and includes, at a minimum, the reason for such separation, together with the stated evidence for such separation. SEC. 9. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SEPARATIONS BY AGENTS OR OFFICERS. (a) In General.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary, in consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human Services, shall develop training and guidance, with an emphasis on the best interests of the child, childhood trauma, attachment, and child development, for use by the agents and officers, in order to standardize the implementation of section 8(b)(3). (b) Annual Review.—Not less frequently than annually, the Secretary of Health and Human Services shall review the guidance developed under subsection (a) and make recommendations to the Secretary to ensure such guidance is in accordance with current evidence and best practices in child welfare, child development, and childhood trauma. (c) Requirement.—The guidance under subsection (a) shall incorporate the presumptions described in section 10. (d) Additional Requirements.— (1) EVIDENCE-BASED.—The guidance and training developed under this section shall incorporate evidence-based practices. (2) TRAINING REQUIRED.— (A) All agents and officers of designated agencies, upon hire, and annually thereafter, shall complete training on adherence to the guidance under this section. (B) All Chief Patrol Agents and Area Port Directors, upon hire, and annually thereafter, shall complete— (i) training on adherence to the guidance under this section; and (ii) 90 minutes of child welfare practice training that is evidence-based and trauma-informed. SEC. 10. PRESUMPTIONS. The presumptions described in this Act are the following: (1) FAMILY UNITY.—There shall be a strong presumption in favor of family unity. (2) SIBLINGS.—To the maximum extent practicable, the Secretary shall ensure that sibling groups remain intact. SEC. 11. REQUIRED POLICY FOR LOCATING SEPARATED CHILDREN. (a) In General.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall publish final public guidance that describes, with specificity, the manner in which an Asylum Applicant may locate a child they were the parent or legal guardian of that was separated from them prior to the enactment of this Act. In developing the public guidance, the Secretary shall consult with the Secretary of Health and Human Services. (b) Written Notification.—The Secretary shall provide each Asylum Applicant who was separated from a child they were the parent or legal guardian of with written notice of the public guidance to locate the separated child. (c) Language Access.—All guidance shall be available in English and Spanish, and at the request of the Asylum Applicant, in the language or manner that is understandable by the Asylum Applicant. SEC. 12. CLARIFICATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS. If a child is separated from a parent or legal guardian, and a State court has not made a determination that the parental rights have been terminated, there is a presumption that— (1) the parental rights remain intact; and (2) the separation does not constitute an affirmative determination of abuse or neglect under Federal or State law. SEC. 13. CLARIFICATION OF EXISTING LAW. (a) Nothing in this Act shall be interpreted to supersede or modify Federal child welfare law, where applicable, including the Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997 (Public Law 105–89). (b) Nothing in this Act shall be interpreted to supersede or modify State child welfare laws where applicable. (c) Nothing in this Act shall be interpreted to grant any due process rights to any individual who entered this country illegally. (d) Nothing in this act shall alter how an unaccompanied alien under the age of eighteen is treated under existing law. (2) ASYLUM APPLICANT.—The term “Asylum Applicant” means an alien who (a) has no permanent immigration status; (b) is detained by the United States government at or near a port of entry or within 100 miles of the border of the United States while having custody of and being in the presence of a child for whom the alien is a parent or legal guardian; and (c) seeks, within 48 hours of detention, asylum pursuant to section 208 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, withholding of removal pursuant to section 241(b)(3) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, or withholding of removal pursuant to the Convention Against Torture. (3) ASYLUM APPLICATION.—The term “asylum application” means an application for asylum pursuant to section 208 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, an application for withholding of removal under section 241(b)(3) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, and/or an application for withholding of removal pursuant to the Convention Against Torture. (4) CHILD.—The term “child” means an individual who— (A) has not reached the age of 18; (B) has no permanent immigration status; and (C) was in the custody and presence of a parent or legal guardian when the parent or legal guardian was detained for illegally entering into the United States at or near a port of entry or within 100 miles of the border of the United States. (5) COMMITTEES OF JURISDICTION.—The term “committees of jurisdiction” means— (A) the Committee on the Judiciary and the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate; and (B) the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives. (6) DANGER OF ABUSE OR NEGLECT AT THE HANDS OF THE PARENT OR LEGAL GUARDIAN.—The term “danger of abuse or neglect at the hands of the parent or legal guardian” shall not mean migrating to or crossing the United States border. (7) DESIGNATED AGENCY.—The term “designated agency” means— (A) the Department of Homeland Security; (B) the Department of Justice; and (C) the Department of Health and Human Services. (8) SECRETARY.—Unless otherwise specified, the term “Secretary” means the Secretary of Homeland Security. SECTION 14. EFFECTIVE DATE The bill shall go into effect upon its constitutional passage.
  13. IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Mr. Vang introduced the following bill; A BILL To incentivize teachers to teach in high poverty schools Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “High Poverty School Teacher Tax Credit Act”. SEC. 2. SENSE OF CONGRESS. (a) Findings.—Congress finds the following: (1) High-poverty schools struggle to attract and retain teachers. (2) A quality gap exists between teachers in high poverty and low poverty schools. (3) A significant gap in pay exists between teachers in high poverty and low poverty schools. (4) The proposed tax credit would have a similar cost to what the federal government spends on graduate medical education. (5) A tax credit could likely result in an even larger take home bonus than the proposed $10,000 since it is a tax credit on after-tax income. SEC. 3. Tax credit. (a) Teachers at schools with 75% or more of students on free or reduced-price lunch (FRPL) will receive a $10,000 refundable credit on their yearly income taxes. (b) Teachers at schools with 50% to 74% of students with FRPL will receive a refundable credit on their yearly incomes taxes that declines by $400 per percentage down from the full $10,000 credit at 75%. SEC. 4. Effective Date. The bill shall go into effect upon its constitutional passage.
  14. IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Mr. Vang (for himself, Mr. Bilirakis, Ms. Kuster of New Hampshire, Mr. Arrington, Mr. Coffman, and Mr. Peters) introduced the following bill; A BILL To direct the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to carry out a demonstration program to provide expanded access to medical services through partnerships between Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers and Federally Qualified Health Centers, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “VA Community Care Enhancement Act”. SEC. 2. DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM ON EXPANDED AVAILABILITY OF MEDICAL SERVICES THROUGH CONTRACTS WITH FEDERALLY QUALIFIED HEALTH CENTERS. (a) Demonstration Program.—The Secretary of Veterans Affairs shall carry out a demonstration program under which the Secretary shall furnish certain medical services under chapter 17 of title 38, United States Code, through contracts between Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers and Federally Qualified Health Centers (hereinafter referred to as “FQHCs”). (b) Community-Care Collaborative Arrangements.—Under the demonstration program, the Secretary shall enter into contracts, on behalf of Department medical centers, with not less than five separate FQHCs that meet the selection criteria under subsection (c). Such a contract shall provide that— (1) a Department medical provider at the medical center may refer patients directly to the FQHC, without any requirement to consult with other agencies, offices, or units within the Department or with entities under contract with the Department; (2) all patient referrals to the FQHC are at the discretion of the Department medical provider, and the decision whether to accept such a referral will be at the discretion of the patient; (3) if a patient accepts such a referral, the FQHC agrees to accept the patient; (4) if the FQHC accepts the patient, the FQHC shall provide medical services to the patient only to the extent that such services are available from the FQHC pursuant to section 330 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 254b); (5) if a patient accepted by the FQHC is a veteran, the FQHC shall accept the family members of the veteran and shall provide care and services to such family members in accordance with chapter 17 of title 38, United States Code, if such family members are eligible for medical services under such chapter; (6) if a patient referred under the demonstration program is not eligible for a type of care or service needed by the patient under chapter 17 of title 38, United States Code, the FQHC agrees to provide such care or service to the patient, and accept payment for such care or service, in accordance with section 330 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 254b); (7) the FQHC agrees to provide to patients referred under the demonstration program— (A) in consultation with the Department medical center, appropriate education on what care and services may be provided to the patient under chapter 17 of title 38, United States Code, and what care and services may not be provided under such title; and (B) appropriate education on what care and services are provided under section 330 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 254b) and what care and services are not provided under such section; (8) the FQHC agrees to provide medical services to the veteran in a context that sufficiently takes into account the culture of members of the uniformed services, veterans, and family members and caregivers of members of the uniformed services and veterans, including the experience of combat and the experience of military sexual trauma; (9) the medical center and the FQHC agree to cooperate to ensure that patients referred under the demonstration program are patients of both the medical center and the FQHC and, for such purposes, to ensure interoperability, to the extent practicable, in terms of sharing the electronic health records of the patients; (10) the FQHC agrees to begin providing care and services to a referred patient promptly after receiving the referral, without regard to whether the patient has completed the process of enrolling in the patient enrollment system under section 1705 of title 38, United States Code; (11) with respect to a patient who is a veteran who has not completed such enrollment process as of the time the referral is made, the FQHC agrees to— (A) in coordination with the medical center, make available to the veteran assistance with the enrollment process; and (B) accept that reimbursement from the Secretary for providing care or services to the veteran will be delayed until after the enrollment process is completed; (12) the FQHC agrees to accept the financial risk that a patient referred under the demonstration program may not qualify for care or services furnished by the Secretary under title 38, United States Code; (13) the FQHC agrees to make available to referred patients, at one or more services sites of the FQHC and in accordance with the limitations on the scope of services applicable under section 330 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 245b)— (A) behavioral and mental health and substance abuse services; (B) women’s health services, including OBGYN services; (C) audiology; (D) HIV and hepatitis C treatment; (E) dental care; (F) optometry and ophthalmology; (G) pain management; (H) internal medicine; (I) cancer detection and screening; (J) podiatry; and (K) urgent care; (14) the FQHC agrees to provide additional services to referred patients to enable such patients to access medical services furnished under the demonstration program, including outreach and transportation services; (15) the Secretary agrees to provide timely reimbursement to the FQHC for medical services, provided to referred patients at the applicable rate for the State in which the FQHC is located under section 1902(bb) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1396a); (16) the FQHC agrees to undergo periodic audits in accordance with section 330 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 254b) and title XIX of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1396 et seq.); and (17) to the extent practicable, the medical center agrees to provide information to patients on the availability in such area of medical services through the participation of the FQHC in the demonstration program, including information on the particular services that are available from the FQHC and on the extent to which the patient will be required to make payments for such service. (c) Selection Criteria.— (1) IN GENERAL.—In order to select FQHCs with which to enter into contracts under subsection (b), the Secretary shall develop selection criteria. Such selection criteria shall— (A) take into account geographic and demographic differences across catchment areas, as defined by the Veterans Health Administration; (B) provide for the selection of one or more FQHCs that have not fewer than two service sites, including one service site in a highly rural area; (C) provide for the selection of one or more FQHCs that— (i) have a large number of service sites; (ii) have a service area— (I) in which a significant number of veterans reside; (II) that includes both rural and urban areas, and one or more Department medical centers; and (III) that is located within 100 miles of a military base; (iii) is participating in a network that— (I) provides connectivity with respect to electronic health records; and (II) includes one or more Department medical centers as participants; and (iv) has engaged in outreach to one or more Department medical centers toward collaborating on the provision of services to veterans; (D) require that a selected FQHC has the capability to assist veterans in navigating the benefits available to them under the laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs; and (E) require a selected FQHC to commit to establishing a program to educate health professionals employed by the FQHC on cultural competency in providing services to veterans. (2) APPROVAL OF CERTAIN FQHCS.—Each contract entered into under subsection (b) shall specify the date on which the FQHC agrees to begin providing medical services to patients referred by a medical provider at a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center under the contract. Such date may not be later than 180 days after the date on which the Secretary and the FQHC enter into the contract. (d) Coordination With Department Of Health And Human Services.—In carrying out the demonstration program under this section, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs shall consult with the Secretary of Health and Human Services (acting through the Administrator of the Health Resources and Services Administration), who shall provide to the Secretary of Veterans Affairs information on the capacity of FQHCs to serve veterans. With respect to FQHCs that are participating in such demonstration program, the Secretary of Health and Human Services may, subject to that availability of appropriations for such purpose, make payments to such FQHCs to increase such capacity. (e) Patient Enrollment.— (1) NON-ENROLLED VETERANS.—Notwithstanding subsection (c) of section 1705 of title 38, United States Code, the Secretary shall develop a process to refer veterans who are not enrolled in the patient enrollment system of the Department of Veterans Affairs under such section to an FQHC for the provision of medical services to the veteran under the pilot program. (2) FACILITATION OF ENROLLMENT.—The Secretary shall develop a process by which FQHCs that have entered into a contract with the Secretary under subsection (b) are able to facilitate the enrollment of veterans referred to the FQHC under paragraph (1) in such patient enrollment system. (f) Electronic Health Records.—The Secretary of Veterans Affairs shall provide notice to any veteran accepting a referral to an FQHC under the demonstration program that such acceptance shall serve as consent for the Department medical center and the FQHC to share electronic health records unless the veteran elects not to authorize such sharing of records using a form provided by the Secretary for such purpose. (g) Rule Of Construction.—Nothing in this section shall be construed as affecting— (1) any authority or obligation of the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to furnish medical services under chapter 17 of title 38, United States Code, to a patient who is referred to an FQHC under the demonstration program; (2) the eligibility of any individual to receive medical services under chapter 17 of title 38, United States Code; or (3) section 330 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 254b). (h) Funding.—No additional amounts are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section. The Secretary shall carry out the demonstration program using amounts otherwise available to the Secretary for Medical Community Care for fiscal years 2018 through 2022. (i) Duration; Termination.— (1) DURATION.—The Secretary of Veterans Affairs may enter into contracts under the demonstration program during the three-year period beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act. Such period may be extended or made permanent at the discretion of the Secretary. (2) PROVISION OF CARE.—If the Secretary terminates the demonstration program under this section, the Secretary shall ensure that patients receiving care or services through a FQHC pursuant to a contract entered into under subsection (b) are able to receive medical services provided by the FQHC under such contract until the conclusion of the relevant episode of care. (j) Definition Of Federally Qualified Health Center.—The term “Federally Qualified Health Center” means an entity receiving a grant under section 330 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 254b) or any other entity described in section 1861(aa)(4) of the Social Security Act.
  15. IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES Mr. Vang (for himself, Mr. Wicker, Ms. Heitkamp, Mr. Boozman, Mr. Barrasso, Mr. Crapo, Mr. Franken, Ms. Hirono, Ms. Klobuchar, Mr. Manchin, Mr. Risch, Mr. Schatz, Mr. Tester, Mr. Enzi, and Mrs.Capito) introduced the following bill; A BILL To amend the Federal Water Pollution Control Act to provide for technical assistance for small treatment works. SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Small and Rural Community Clean Water Technical Assistance Act”. SEC. 2. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE FOR SMALL TREATMENT WORKS. (a) In General.—Title II of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1281 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following: “SEC. 222. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE FOR SMALL TREATMENT WORKS. “(a) Definitions.—In this section: “(1) QUALIFIED NONPROFIT SMALL TREATMENT WORKS TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE PROVIDER.—The term ‘qualified nonprofit small treatment works technical assistance provider’ means a nonprofit organization that, as determined by the Administrator— “(A) is qualified and experienced in providing training and technical assistance to small treatment works; and “(B) the small treatment works in the State finds to be the most beneficial and effective. “(2) SMALL TREATMENT WORKS.—The term ‘small treatment works’ means a publicly owned treatment works serving not more than 10,000 individuals. “(b) Technical Assistance.—The Administrator may use amounts made available to carry out this section to provide grants or cooperative agreements to qualified nonprofit small treatment works technical assistance providers to provide to owners and operators of small treatment works onsite technical assistance, circuit rider technical assistance programs, multi-State, regional technical assistance programs, and onsite and regional training, to assist the small treatment works in achieving compliance with this Act or obtaining financing under this Act for eligible projects. “(c) Authorization Of Appropriations.—There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section for grants for small treatment works technical assistance, $15,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2019 through 2023. “SEC. 223. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE FOR MEDIUM TREATMENT WORKS. “(a) Definitions.—In this section: “(1) MEDIUM TREATMENT WORKS.—The term ‘medium treatment works’ means a publicly owned treatment works serving not fewer than 10,001, and not more than 75,000, individuals. “(2) QUALIFIED NONPROFIT MEDIUM TREATMENT WORKS TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE PROVIDER.—The term ‘qualified nonprofit medium treatment works technical assistance provider’ means a qualified nonprofit technical assistance provider of water and wastewater services to medium-sized communities that provides technical assistance (including circuit rider technical assistance programs, multi-State, regional assistance programs, and training and preliminary engineering evaluations) to owners and operators of medium treatment works, which may include a State agency. “(b) Technical Assistance.—The Administrator may use amounts made available to carry out this section to provide grants or cooperative agreements to qualified nonprofit medium treatment works technical assistance providers to provide to owners and operators of medium treatment works onsite technical assistance, circuit-rider technical assistance programs, multi-State, regional technical assistance programs, and onsite and regional training to assist medium treatment works that are facing difficulty in achieving compliance with this Act or obtaining financing under this Act for eligible projects. “(c) Authorization Of Appropriations.—There is authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section $10,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2019 through 2023.”. (b) Water Pollution Control Revolving Loan Funds.— (1) IN GENERAL.—Section 603 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1383) is amended— (A) in subsection (d)— (i) in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by inserting “and as provided in subsection (e)” after “State law”; (ii) by redesignating subsections (e) through (i) as subsections (f) through (j), respectively; and (iii) by inserting after subsection (d) the following: “(e) Additional Use Of Funds.—A State may use an additional 2 percent of the funds annually allotted to the State under this section for qualified nonprofit small treatment works technical assistance providers (as the term is defined in section 222) and qualified nonprofit medium treatment works technical assistance providers (as the term in defined in section 223) to provide technical assistance to small treatment works (as the term is defined in section 222) and medium treatment works (as the term is defined in section 223) in the State.”. (2) CONFORMING AMENDMENT.—Section 221(d) of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1301(d)) is amended by striking “section 603(h)” and inserting “section 603(i)”.
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