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Phillip Huffines

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Everything posted by Phillip Huffines

  1. Phillip Huffines

    @Huffines

    So Solin is corrupt, go figure. He won't be pulled from the ticket through because that's the real way ForWard.
  2. Phillip Huffines

    @Huffines

    Welcome to the official social media outlet of Texas 13th district representative, house majority leader, and Nationalist Caucus leader Phillip Huffines
  3. Phillip Huffines

    Comprehensive Educational Reform Act

    Plain English Summary: The bill does the following: Provide school choice for children of families 150% and below of the federal poverty line with an appropriated $3,000,000,000 to cover public schools for loss of students Reauthorize funding for armed security in public schools Allocates $5,000,000,000 for an Early College Federal Pell Grant program for high school students to earn college credit in early college high schools, community colleges, or online college courses Allocates $1,000,000,000 in grants for the preparation of career and technical educators Allocates $3,000,000,000 for the creation of career/technical/vocational education, work experience, and apprenticeship programs in public high schools Guarantees loans for school food facility expenses in excess of $500 Provides fund matching for the training of school food service personnel Allows individuals with college debts to voluntarily delay social security benefits in exchange for college debt forgiveness Enacts a pilot program for the formerly incarcerated to attend college at up to 25 different historically black colleges upon re-entry into the general public Allows Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 funding to be used on violence prevention and mental health initiatives Ends and prevents future federal control of specific instructional content, academic standards and assessments, curricula, accountability systems, or programs of instruction. Ending Common Core, federal testing requirements, and allowing local governments to set their own standards as they see best fit. The creation of a 10% tax on remittances to fund public school teacher pay raises giving roughly an increase of $4,317 per teacher in the United States The ending of federal Marijuana prohibition and the establishment of a 21% federal Marijuana sales tax to fund all appropriated funds in the bill and lend excess funds the Department of Education to appropriate at their own discretion. The creation of at least 300,000 jobs with the allowed expansion of the legal Marijuana industry IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Mr. Huffines (For himself, Mr. King, Mr. Garrett, Ms. Gabbard, Mr. Taylor, Mr. Rogers, Mr. Barletta, Mr. Faso, Mr. Hill, Mr. Alexander, and Mr. Biggs) introduced the following bill; A BILL To comprehensively reform K-12 education and higher learning in the United States. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Comprehensive Educational Reform Act”. SECTION 2. Table of Contents. Section 1: Short Title Section 2: Table of Contents Section 3: State Educational Agency Grants to Eligible Children Section 4: Grant Program for School Security Section 5: Early College Federal Pell Grant Section 6: Partnership Grants for the Preparation of Career and Technical Education Teachers Section 7: Loan Guarantees and Grants to Finance Certain Improvements to School Lunch Facilities Section 8: Training and Technical Assistance For Food Service Personnel Section 9: Student Security Loan Forgiveness Program Section 10: Optional Delayed Eligibility For Old Age Insurance Benefits Sections 11: Offender Education Re-Entry Pilot Program Section 12: Violence Prevention and Mental Health Support Section 13: Decentralization in Academic Standards Section 14: Remittance Fees For Teacher Pay Raise Section 15: Application of the Controlled Substances Act to Marijuana Section 16: Marijuana Sales Fees For Funding Education Section 17: Constitutional Passage SECTION. 3. STATE EDUCATIONAL AGENCY GRANTS TO ELIGIBLE CHILDREN. (a) In General.—Part A of title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6311 et seq.) is amended to read as follows: “PART A—STATE EDUCATIONAL AGENCY GRANTS TO ELIGIBLE CHILDREN “SEC. 1111. ALLOCATIONS TO STATES. “(a) In General.—For each fiscal year, the Secretary shall allocate the amount appropriated to carry out this part among State education agencies based on the number of eligible children residing in each State. “(b) Eligible Child.—In this section, the term ‘eligible child’ means a child aged 5 to 18, inclusive, from a family with an income at or below 150 percent of the poverty level on the basis of the most recent satisfactory data published by the Department of Commerce. “(c) Criteria Of Poverty.—In determining the families with incomes at or below 150 percent of the poverty level for the purposes of this section, a State educational agency shall use the criteria of poverty used by the Census Bureau in compiling the most recent decennial census, as the criteria have been updated by increases in the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers, published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. “SEC. 1112. FUNDS FOLLOWING ELIGIBLE CHILDREN. “(a) Calculation Of Per Pupil Amount.—For each fiscal year, the State educational agency shall calculate the per pupil amount by dividing the amount made available to the agency under section 1111 by the number of eligible children (as defined in section 1111(b)) residing in the State. “(b) Use Of Funds.—Each State educational agency shall use each per pupil amount calculated under subsection (a) for qualified elementary, secondary education, or home schooling expenses and in a manner directed by State law. “(c) Funds Distributed To Parents.—In a case in which State law directs a State educational agency to distribute all or a portion of a per pupil amount to a parent of an eligible child, the agency also shall determine, consistent with State law, how the agency will verify that funds are being used in accordance with this section and whether to require the parent to establish an educational savings account or other dedicated account to maintain such funds. “(d) Definition.—In this section, the term ‘qualified elementary and secondary education expenses’, when used with respect to a child, means any of the following: “(1) Expenses within the budget of the local educational agency having jurisdiction over the geographic area in which the child resides. “(2) Expenses within the budget of the public or charter school the child may attend without paying tuition or fees. “(3) Tuition and fees required to be paid in order for the child to attend a public or charter school in the State in which the child resides. “(4) Tuition and fees required to be paid in order for the child to attend an accredited or otherwise State-approved private school in the State in which the child resides. “(5) Fees required to be paid for the child to participate in a State-approved supplemental educational services program. SECTION. 4. GRANT PROGRAM FOR SCHOOL SECURITY. Part AA of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. 10551 et seq.) is amended— (1) in section 2701 (34 U.S.C. 10551)— (A) in subsection (a), by striking “, including the placement and use of metal detectors and other deterrent measures, ” and inserting “through evidence-based training, technology, and equipment and technical assistance to prevent violence”; (B) in subsection (b)— (i) by striking paragraphs (2) and (3); (ii) by redesignating paragraph (1) as paragraph (2); (iii) by inserting before paragraph (2), as so redesignated, the following: “(1) Evidence-based training to prevent student violence against others and self, including training for local law enforcement officers, school personnel, and students.”; (iv) in paragraph (2), as so redesignated, by striking “Placement” and inserting the following: “Evidence-based technology and equipment to improve school security and prevent school violence, including— “(i) the development and operation of anonymous reporting systems for threats of school violence, including mobile telephone applications, hotlines, and Internet websites; and “(ii) placement”; (v) by redesignating paragraphs (4) and (5) as paragraphs (3) and (4), respectively; (vi) in paragraph (3), as so redesignated— (I) by inserting “evidence-based school threat assessment and” after “operation of”; (II) by inserting “and school personnel,” after “law enforcement agencies”; and (III) by striking “specialized” and inserting “evidence-based”; and (vii) by striking paragraph (6); (C) by redesignating subsections (c) through (f) as subsections (d) through (g), respectively; (D) by inserting after subsection (b) the following: “(c) Contracts And Subawards.—A State, unit of local government, or Indian tribe may, in using a grant under this part for purposes authorized under subsection (b), use the grant to contract with or make one or more subawards to one or more— “(1) schools or local education agencies; “(2) nonprofit organizations; or “(3) units of local government or tribal organizations.”; (E) in subsection (e), as so redesignated— (i) in paragraph (1), by striking “50 percent” and inserting “75 percent”; and (ii) by striking paragraph (3); and (F) in subsection (f), as so redesignated, by adding at the end the following: “In awarding grants under this part, the Director shall also ensure, to the extent practicable and consistent with the individualized needs of each school at which improvements are to be made, an equitable distribution, in the aggregate, of funds among the uses specified in subsection (b).”; (2) in section 2702 (34 U.S.C. 10552)— (A) in subsection (a)— (i) in paragraph (1)— (I) in subparagraph (A), by inserting “, including the process used by the applicant to identify and assess evidence-based programs, practices, technology, or equipment to be funded under the grant” after “grant”; and (II) in subparagraph (B), by striking “and” at the end; (ii) in paragraph (2)— (I) in the matter preceding subparagraph (A)— (aa) by striking “individuals not limited to”; (bb) by inserting “and other relevant individuals” after “officers”; and (cc) by striking “child psychologists” and inserting “licensed mental health professionals”; and (II) in subparagraph (B), by striking the period at the end and inserting a semicolon; and (iii) by adding at the end the following: “(3) include an assurance that the applicant shall maintain and report such data, records, and information (programmatic and financial) as the Director may reasonably require; and “(4) include a certification, made in a form acceptable to the Director, that— “(A) the programs to be funded by the grant meet all the requirements of this part; “(B) all the information contained in the application is correct; and “(C) the applicant will comply with all provisions of this part and all other applicable Federal laws.”; and (B) in subsection (b), by striking “this part” and inserting “the STOP School Violence Act of 2018”; (3) in section 2703 (34 U.S.C. 10553)— (A) in the section heading, by inserting “; GRANT ACCOUNTABILITY” after “CONGRESS”; (B) by striking “Not later” and inserting the following: “(a) Annual Report.—Not later”; and (C) by adding at the end the following: “(b) Grant Accountability.—Section 3026 (relating to grant accountability) shall apply to grants awarded by the Director under this part. For purposes of the preceding sentence, any references in section 3026 to the Attorney General shall be considered references to the Director and any references in that section to part LL shall be considered references to part AA.”; (4) in section 2704 (34 U.S.C. 10554)— (A) in paragraph (1)— (i) by striking “a public” and inserting “an”; and (ii) by inserting “, including a Bureau-funded school (as defined in section 1141 of the Education Amendments of 1978 (25 U.S.C. 2021))” after “secondary school”; (B) in paragraph (2), by striking “and” at the end; (C) in paragraph (3), by striking the period at the end and inserting a semicolon; and (D) by adding at the end the following: “(4) the term ‘evidence-based’ means a program, practice, technology, or equipment that— “(A) demonstrates a statistically significant effect on relevant outcomes based on— “(i) strong evidence from not less than 1 well-designed and well-implemented experimental study; “(ii) moderate evidence from not less than 1 well-designed and well-implemented quasi-experimental study; or “(iii) promising evidence from not less than 1 well-designed and well-implemented correlational study with statistical controls for selection bias; “(B) demonstrates a rationale based on high-quality research findings or positive evaluation that such program, practice, technology, or equipment is likely to improve relevant outcomes, and includes ongoing efforts to examine the effects of the program, practice, technology, or equipment; or “(C) in the case of technology or equipment, demonstrates that use of the technology or equipment is— “(i) consistent with best practices for school security, including— “(I) applicable standards for school security established by a Federal or State government agency; and “(II) findings and recommendations of public commissions and task forces established to make recommendations or set standards for school security; and “(ii) compliant with all applicable codes, including building and life safety codes; and “(5) the term ‘tribal organization’ has the same meaning given the term in section 4(l) of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 5304(l)).”; and (5) in section 2705— (A) by striking “There are” and inserting the following: “(a) In General.—There are”; (B) by striking “part $30,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2001 through 2009” and inserting the following: “part— “(1) $75,000,000 for fiscal year 2019; and “(2) $100,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2028.”; and (C) by adding at the end the following: “(b) Offset.—Any funds appropriated under this section may be offset by an equal reduction in the funds appropriated, if any, for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative of the National Institute of Justice. “(c) Rules Of Construction.— “(1) None of the funds appropriated to carry out this part may be used to provide firearms or training in the use of firearms. “(2) Nothing in this part shall be construed to prohibit any other existing or future law from permitting or funding the provision of firearms or training in the use of firearms.”. SECTION. 5. EARLY COLLEGE FEDERAL PELL GRANT. Section 401 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1070a) is amended by adding at the end the following: “(k) Early College Federal Pell Grants.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—Notwithstanding the requirement under section 484(a)(1) that a student not been enrolled in an elementary or secondary school to be eligible to receive a Federal Pell Grant under this section, for the award years beginning on July 1, 2020, and ending on June 30, 2028, the Secretary shall carry out a program to award Early College Federal Pell Grants to eligible students to support enrollment in, and completion of, postsecondary courses offered through an early college high school, community college, or online college course. “(2) MAXIMUM PERIOD FOR EARLY COLLEGE FEDERAL PELL GRANTS.—An eligible student may receive an Early College Federal Pell Grant under this subsection in an amount equal to the cost of not more than 4 full-time postsecondary semesters, or the equivalent of 4 full-time postsecondary semesters, as determined by the Secretary by regulation, while enrolled in postsecondary courses offered by an early college high school, community college, or online college course. “(3) COUNTING OF AWARDS FOR PURPOSES OF FEDERAL PELL GRANTS.— “(A) IN GENERAL.—An Early College Federal Pell Grant received under this subsection shall be counted toward the maximum period for which a student may receive Federal Pell Grants under this section, as provided under subsection (c)(5). “(B) WAIVER.—The Secretary may waive the requirement under subparagraph (A) on a case-by-case basis for any student demonstrating evidence of a credible disruption or redirection in course of study necessitating additional time to complete a postsecondary degree or credential. “(4) TERMS AND CONDITIONS.— “(A) IN GENERAL.—Except as provided in this subsection, an Early College Federal Pell Grant received under this subsection shall have the same terms and conditions, and be awarded in the same manner, as Federal Pell Grants awarded under this section. “(B) AMOUNT.—The Secretary shall pay an eligible institution that is engaged in a partnership as part of an early college high school, community college, or online college course an amount equal to the cost of tuition, fees, and books for each “(C) ELIGIBLE STUDENT.—The term ‘eligible student’ means a student enrolled at an early college high school, community college, or with an online college course who, if such student met the requirements of section 484 for eligibility for a Federal Pell Grant, would be awarded a Federal Pell Grant after the determination of the expected family contribution for such student. SECTION. 6. PARTNERSHIP GRANTS FOR THE PREPARATION OF CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION TEACHERS. Section 202 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1022a) is amended— (1) by redesignating subsections (f) through (k) as subsections (g) through (l), respectively; (2) in subsection (b)— (A) in paragraph (1), by inserting “and career and technical education teachers” after “early childhood educators”; and (B) in paragraph (6)(C), by striking “subsection (f) or (g)” and inserting “subsection (g) or (h)”; (3) in subsection (c)— (A) in paragraph (1), by inserting “a program for the preparation of career and technical education teachers under subsection (f),” after “subsection (e),”; and (B) in paragraph (2), by striking “subsection (f)” and inserting “subsection (g)”; and (4) by inserting after subsection (e) the following: “(f) Partnership Grants For The Preparation Of Career And Technical Education Teachers.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—An eligible partnership that receives a grant under this section to carry out a program for the preparation of career and technical education teachers shall establish an effective secondary school career and technical education teacher preparation program that shall be— “(A) available to mid-career professionals or recent graduates of an institution of higher education, who have expertise in a program area in which a skilled career and technical education teacher shortage has been identified through a needs assessment described in paragraph (2); “(B) an opportunity for program participants to obtain initial licensure based on State requirements and the basic skills required for entry into the education profession, and the option of earning a bachelor’s degree or a master’s degree; and “(C) an opportunity for program participants who are current educators and who do not have subject matter expertise in a career and technical education field identified through the needs assessment under paragraph (2) to receive technical skills training to be able to effectively teach in a classroom setting the career and technical skills identified in such assessment based on industry standards. “(2) NEEDS ASSESSMENT.—Each of the partners in an eligible partnership that receives a grant under this section to carry out a program for the preparation of career and technical education teachers shall conduct a needs assessment— “(A) with respect to the preparation, ongoing training, professional development, and retention of career and technical education teachers in program areas linked to the education and skill needs of the local or regional economy; and “(B) that takes into account the current needs of a State, local, or regional market, as well as trends identified in section 102(b)(1)(B) of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. “(3) PARTICIPANT ELIGIBILITY, APPLICATION, AND SELECTION.— “(A) PARTICIPANT ELIGIBILITY.—In order to be eligible to participate in a career and technical education teacher preparation program under this subsection, an individual— “(i) shall— “(I) have at least a bachelor's degree; “(II) have an active industry-recognized credential in a technical profession if the eligible partnership determines that the program leading to the credential is of high quality, and meets the State’s minimum requirements for career and technical education teachers in the field, based either on years of related work experience or a number of specified hours in the field; or “(III) be a former member of the Armed Forces with a Department of Defense recognized active technical credential; and “(ii) may be a licensed teacher with a need for technical skills training. “(B) APPLICATION AND SELECTION.— “(i) APPLICATION.—Each eligible individual described in subparagraph (A) who desires to participate in the career and technical education teacher preparation program under this subsection shall submit an application to the eligible partnership. “(ii) SELECTION.— “(I) IN GENERAL.—Each eligible partnership shall select applicants for participation in the career and technical education teacher preparation program based on the career and technical education program needs of any high-need local educational agencies in the partnership. “(II) REQUIREMENT FOR VACANT POSITIONS.—Any vacant career and technical educator positions or positions with a demonstrated connection to the needs assessment described in paragraph (2) within the high-need local educational agency in an eligible partnership that receives a grant under this section to carry out a program for the preparation of career and technical education teachers shall be filled with career and technical education teacher preparation program participants. “(iii) RECRUITMENT.—An eligible partnership may develop and implement a teacher recruitment program to invite eligible individuals to participate in the career and technical education program. “(4) REQUIRED CLINICAL EXPERIENCE COMPONENTS.—Each career and technical education teacher preparation program carried out under this subsection shall include the following program components: “(A) Training in pedagogy, including classroom management, lesson planning, student learning methods, and academic and career and technical education content integration. “(B) Training in using empirically based practice and scientifically valid research in classroom instruction. “(C) Necessary preparation to obtain a teaching license based on State licensing requirements in the State in which the partnership operates, prior to entering the classroom. “(D) Literacy training for incorporating technical texts into the classroom. “(E) At least 1 year of clinical experience concurrent with the pre-classroom training program. “(F) Training to effectively teach technical skills to industry standards in a classroom setting. “(G) For licensed teachers, technical skills and pedagogical training related to the career and technical education program they are intending to teach. “(5) REQUIRED PRE-SERVICE COMPONENTS.—Each career and technical education teacher preparation program carried out under this subsection shall require— “(A) program participants, after completing pre-classroom training and who have at least State recognized provisional licensure to teach, to be paired with a mentor teacher with expertise in teaching the same or similar content for a period of not less than 2 years within the same school or school district, if available, and, if not available, the program shall specify how the program participant will be mentored; and “(B) continuing professional development coursework for such program participants over the course of 3 years to ensure that such teachers— “(i) are able to understand and implement research-based teaching practices in classroom instruction; “(ii) have knowledge of student learning methods; “(iii) are data-literate to continuously, effectively, and ethically access, interpret, act on, and communicate multiple types of data from State, local, classroom, and other sources to improve outcomes for students in a manner appropriate to educators’ professional roles and responsibilities; “(iv) possess skills to analyze student academic and technical achievement data and other measures of student learning, and use such data and measures to improve classroom instruction; “(v) possess the skills to develop, implement, and utilize interim and formative assessments to improve classroom instruction; “(vi) possess teaching skills and an understanding of effective instructional strategies across the technical and all applicable academic content areas that enable such teachers to— “(I) meet the specific learning needs of all students, including students with disabilities, students who are limited English proficient, students who are gifted and talented, and students with low literacy levels; and “(II) differentiate instruction for such students; “(vii) possess strategies for incorporating content from non-career and technical education courses and standards for college and career into career and technical education courses; “(viii) are able to effectively participate as a member of an individualized education program team, as defined in section 614(d)(1)(B) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act; and “(ix) are able to successfully employ effective strategies for literacy instruction in technical coursework. “(6) AGREEMENT TO SERVE.— “(A) IN GENERAL.—Except as provided in subparagraph (B), each career and technical education teacher preparation program carried out under this subsection shall require program participants to serve as a full-time career and technical education teacher in a high-need local educational agency that is a part of the eligible partnership for a total of not less than 3 academic years immediately after successfully completing the pre-classroom training program component. “(B) SERVING LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCIES OUTSIDE OF THE PARTNERSHIP.—If there are no full-time career and technical education teacher positions in a high-need local educational agency that is a part of the eligible partnership, a program participant may fulfill the service requirement under subparagraph (A) through serving as a full-time career and technical education teacher in a high-need local educational agency that is not a part of the eligible partnership. “(C) CERTIFICATION OF EMPLOYMENT.—A program participant under this subsection shall provide the eligible partnership with certification of the employment that is required under this paragraph. “(7) STIPENDS OR SALARIES; APPLICATIONS; REPAYMENTS.— “(A) STIPENDS OR SALARIES.—A career and technical education teacher preparation program under this subsection shall provide a one-year living stipend or salary to program participants during the pre-classroom training program component. “(B) APPLICATIONS FOR STIPENDS OR SALARIES.—Each career and technical education teacher preparation program participant desiring a stipend or salary during the pre-classroom training program component shall submit an application to the eligible partnership at such time, and containing such information and assurances, as the eligible partnership may require. “(C) REPAYMENTS.— “(i) IN GENERAL.—A grantee carrying out a career and technical education teacher preparation program under this subsection shall require a recipient of a stipend or salary under subparagraph (A) who does not complete, or who notifies the partnership that the recipient intends not to complete, the service obligation required by paragraph (6) to repay such stipend or salary to the eligible partnership, together with interest, at a rate specified by the partnership in the agreement, and in accordance with such other terms and conditions specified by the eligible partnership, as necessary. “(ii) OTHER TERMS AND CONDITIONS.—Any other terms and conditions specified by the eligible partnership may include reasonable provisions for pro rata repayment of the stipend or salary described in subparagraph (A) or for deferral of a program participant's service obligation required by paragraph (6), on grounds of health, incapacitation, inability to secure employment as a full-time career and technical education teacher, being called to active duty in the Armed Forces of the United States, or other extraordinary circumstances. “(iii) USE OF REPAYMENTS.—An eligible partnership shall use any repayment received under this subparagraph to carry out additional activities that are consistent with the purposes of this subsection. “(8) REPORTS; PARENTS RIGHT-TO-KNOW; DEVELOPMENT OF PERFORMANCE MEASURES.— “(A) ANNUAL REPORT.—An eligible partnership that receives a grant under this section to carry out a program for the preparation of career and technical education teachers shall submit to the Secretary and make publicly available, at such time and in such manner as the Secretary may require, an annual report that includes— “(i) data on the eligible partnership’s progress on the performance measures described in section 204(a); and “(ii) a description of the challenges the eligible partnership has faced in implementing the grant and how the eligible partnership has addressed or plans to address such challenges. “(B) PUBLICLY AVAILABLE.—Each eligible partnership that receives a grant under this section to carry out a program for the preparation of career and technical education teachers shall complete and make publicly available, not later than 90 days after the grant period for such eligible partnership ends, an evaluation based on the evaluation plan described in section 204(a). “(C) PARENTS RIGHT-TO-KNOW.—At the beginning of each school year, a high-need local educational agency that receives funds under this subsection shall— “(i) notify the parents of each student attending any school receiving funds under this subsection that the parents may request, and the agency will provide the parents on request (and in a timely manner), the information described in section 1111(h)(6)(A) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965; and “(ii) provide to each such parent the information and notice described in section 1111(h)(6)(B) of such Act. “(D) DEVELOPMENT OF PERFORMANCE MEASURES.—The Secretary shall develop performance measures prior to awarding grants under this section, with input and consultation of schools of education, school administrators, teachers, professional nonprofit technical and career organizations, and the opportunity for a 60-day public comment period. The Secretary shall ensure that such measures are made available to potential applicants prior to seeking applications for such grants.”. SECTION. 7. LOAN GUARANTEES AND GRANTS TO FINANCE CERTAIN IMPROVEMENTS TO SCHOOL LUNCH FACILITIES. The Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act is amended by inserting after section 26 (42 U.S.C. 1769g) the following: “SEC. 27. LOAN GUARANTEES AND GRANTS TO FINANCE CERTAIN IMPROVEMENTS TO SCHOOL LUNCH FACILITIES. “(a) Definitions.—In this section: “(1) DURABLE EQUIPMENT.—The term ‘durable equipment’ means durable food preparation, handling, cooking, serving, and storage equipment greater than $500 in value. “(2) ELIGIBLE ENTITY.—The term ‘eligible entity’ means— “(A) a local educational agency or a school food authority administering or operating a school lunch program; “(B) a tribal organization; or “(C) a consortium that includes a local educational agency or school food authority described in subparagraph (A), a tribal organization, or both. “(3) INFRASTRUCTURE.—The term ‘infrastructure’ means a food storage facility, kitchen, food service facility, cafeteria, dining room, or food preparation facility. “(4) LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY.—The term ‘local educational agency’ has the meaning given the term in section 8101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801). “(5) SCHOOL FOOD AUTHORITY.—The term ‘school food authority’ has the meaning given the term in section 210.2 of title 7, Code of Federal Regulations (or any successor regulation). “(6) TRIBAL ORGANIZATION.—The term ‘tribal organization’ has the meaning given the term in section 4 of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 5304). “(b) Loan Guarantees For Assistance To Schools For Infrastructure Improvements And Durable Equipment Necessary To Provide Healthy Meals Through School Lunch Programs.— “(1) AUTHORITY TO GUARANTEE LOANS.—The Secretary shall issue a loan guarantee to an eligible entity for purposes of financing the construction, remodeling, or expansion of infrastructure or the purchase of durable equipment that the Secretary determines will assist the eligible entity in providing healthy meals through a school lunch program. “(2) COMPETITIVE BASIS.—Subject to paragraph (3), the Secretary shall select eligible entities to receive a loan guarantee under this subsection on a competitive basis. “(3) PREFERENCES.—In issuing a loan guarantee under this subsection, the Secretary shall give a preference to an eligible entity that, as compared with other eligible entities seeking a loan guarantee under this subsection, the Secretary determines demonstrates substantial or disproportionate— “(A) need for infrastructure improvement; or “(B) durable equipment need or impairment. “(4) OVERSIGHT.—The Secretary shall establish procedures to enable the Secretary to oversee the construction, remodeling, or expansion of infrastructure or the purchase of durable equipment for which a loan guarantee is issued under this subsection. “(5) GUARANTEE AMOUNT.—A loan guarantee issued under this subsection may not guarantee more than 80 percent of the principal amount of the loan. “(6) FEES.—The Secretary shall establish fees with respect to loan guarantees under this subsection that, as determined by the Secretary— “(A) are sufficient to cover all the administrative costs to the Federal Government for the operation of the program; “(B) may be in the form of an application or transaction fee, or interest rate adjustment; and “(C) may be based on the risk premium associated with the loan or loan guarantee, taking into consideration— “(i) the price of Treasury obligations of a similar maturity; “(ii) prevailing market conditions; “(iii) the ability of the eligible infrastructure project to support the loan guarantee; and “(iv) the total amount of the loan guarantee. “(7) FUNDING.— “(A) IN GENERAL.—To provide loan guarantees under this subsection, the Secretary shall reserve $300,000,000 of the loan guarantee authority remaining and unobligated as of the date of enactment of the Comprehensive Educational Reform Act under the program of community facility guaranteed loans under section 306(a) of the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act (7 U.S.C. 1926(a)). “(B) TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE.—The Secretary may use not more than 5 percent of the amount made available to carry out this subsection for each fiscal year to provide technical assistance to applicants and prospective applicants in preparing applications and creating financing packages that leverage a mix of public and private funding sources. “(c) Equipment Grants.— “(1) AUTHORITY TO MAKE GRANTS.—Beginning in fiscal year 2020 and subject to the availability of appropriations, the Secretary shall make grants, on a competitive basis, to eligible entities to assist the eligible entities in purchasing the durable equipment and infrastructure needed to serve healthier meals and improve food safety. “(2) PRIORITY.—In awarding grants under this subsection, the Secretary shall give priority to— “(A) eligible entities in States that have enacted comparable statutory grant funding mechanisms or that have otherwise appropriated funds to assist eligible entities in purchasing the durable equipment and infrastructure needed to serve healthier meals and improve food safety, as determined by the Secretary; and “(B) eligible entities that have identified and are reasonably expected to meet an unmet local or community need, including through— “(i) a public-private partnership or partnership with a food pantry or other low-income assistance agency; or “(ii) the provision for or allowance of kitchen or cafeteria usage by related or outside community organizations. “(3) FEDERAL SHARE.— “(A) IN GENERAL.—The Federal share of costs for assistance funded through a grant awarded under this subsection shall not exceed 80 percent of the total cost of the durable equipment or infrastructure. “(B) MATCHING.—As a condition on receiving a grant under this subsection, an eligible entity shall provide matching support in the form of cash or in-kind contributions. “(C) WAIVER.—The Secretary may waive or vary the requirements of subparagraphs (A) and (B) if the Secretary determines that undue hardship or effective exclusion from participation in the grant program under this subsection would otherwise result. “(4) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.— “(A) IN GENERAL.—There are authorized to be appropriated $25,000,000 to carry out this subsection for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2028. “(B) TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE.—The Secretary may use not more than 5 percent of the amount made available to carry out this subsection for each fiscal year to provide technical assistance to applicants and prospective applicants in preparing applications and creating financing packages that leverage a mix of public and private funding sources.”. SECTION. 8. TRAINING AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE FOR SCHOOL FOOD SERVICE PERSONNEL. The Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act is amended by inserting after section 21 (42 U.S.C. 1769b–1) the following: “SEC. 21A. TRAINING AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE FOR SCHOOL FOOD SERVICE PERSONNEL. “(a) In General.—The Secretary shall carry out a grant program under which the Secretary shall award grants, on a competitive basis, to provide support to eligible third-party training institutions described in subsection (b) to develop and administer training and technical assistance for school food service personnel to meet nutrition standards under section 4(b)(3) and improve efficacy and efficiency of the school lunch program under this Act and the school breakfast program established by section 4 of the Child Nutrition Act of 1966 (42 U.S.C. 1773). “(b) Eligible Third-Party Institutions Defined.—For purposes of this section, the term ‘eligible third-party institution’ means— “(1) a nonprofit organization with demonstrated experience in food or nutrition services training and technical assistance; “(2) an institution of higher education as defined in section 102 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1002); “(3) an area career and technical education school as defined in section 3 of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 (20 U.S.C. 2302); or “(4) a consortium of entities described in paragraphs (1), (2), and (3). “(c) Criteria For Eligible Third-Party Institutions.—The Secretary shall establish specific criteria that eligible third-party training institutions shall meet to qualify to receive grants under this section, which shall include— “(1) a demonstrated capacity to administer effective training and technical assistance programming to school food service personnel; “(2) prior, successful experience in providing or engaging in training and technical assistance programming or applied research activities involving eligible entities, school food service administrators, or directors; “(3) prior, successful experience in developing relevant educational training tools or course materials or curricula on topics addressing child and school nutrition or the updated nutrition standards under section 4(b)(3); and “(4) the ability to deliver effective and cost-efficient training and technical assistance programming to school food service personnel— “(A) at training sites that are located within a proximate geographic distance to schools, central kitchens, or other worksites; or “(B) through an online training and assistance program on topics that do not require in-person attendance. “(d) Program Assistance.—The Secretary shall assist the institutions receiving grants under this section in publicizing and disseminating training and other project materials and online tools to the maximum extent practicable. “(e) Federal Share.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—The Federal share of costs for training and technical assistance funded through a grant awarded under this section shall not exceed 80 percent of the total cost of the training and technical assistance. “(2) MATCHING.—As a condition of receiving a grant under this section, the eligible third-party training institution shall provide matching support in the form of cash or in-kind contributions. “(f) Oversight.—The Secretary shall establish procedures to enable the Secretary— “(1) to oversee the administration and operation of training and technical assistance funded through grants awarded under this section; and “(2) to ensure that the training and assistance is operated consistent with the goals and requirements of this Act. “(g) Authorization Of Appropriations.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—There are authorized to be appropriated $10,000,000 to carry out this section for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2028. “(2) TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE.—The Secretary may use not more than 5 percent of the amount made available to carry out this section for each fiscal year to provide technical assistance to applicants and prospective applicants in preparing applications and creating financing packages that leverage a mix of public and private funding sources.”. SECTION. 9. STUDENT SECURITY LOAN FORGIVENESS PROGRAM. Section 455 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1087e) is amended by adding at the end the following: “(r) Student Security Loan Forgiveness Program.— “(1) PROGRAM AUTHORIZED.—Beginning not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of the Comprehensive Educational Reform Act the Secretary of Education, jointly with the Commissioner of Social Security, shall carry out a program under which the Secretary shall issue student loan forgiveness credits to qualified borrowers of eligible Federal Direct loans in exchange for delayed eligibility for old-age insurance benefits under title II of the Social Security Act (as amended by the Comprehensive Educational Reform Act) in accordance with this subsection. “(2) AGREEMENT REQUIRED.—To be eligible to participate in the program, a qualified borrower shall enter into a written agreement with the Secretary of Education and the Commissioner of Social Security under which the borrower— “(A) elects to receive a specified number of student loan forgiveness credits not greater than 73; and “(B) acknowledges the extent of the borrower’s delayed eligibility for old-age insurance benefits under title II of the Social Security Act (as amended by the Comprehensive Educational Reform Act) as a result of receiving such credits. “(3) TERMINATION.—No borrower may enter into an agreement under paragraph (2) unless such borrower was a qualified borrower on or before the date that is 15 years after the date of the enactment of the Comprehensive Educational Reform Act. “(4) COMBINATION WITH OTHER FORGIVENESS PROGRAMS.—Unless otherwise provided by law, a qualified borrower may combine forgiveness under this subsection with other forgiveness programs under this Act, except in no case shall the total amount of forgiveness received by a borrower under all such programs exceed the amount of Federal student loans owed by such borrower. “(5) DEFINITIONS.—In this section: “(A) DEFAULT.—The term ‘default’ has the meaning given the term in section 435(l). “(B) ELIGIBLE FEDERAL DIRECT LOAN.—The term ‘eligible Federal Direct loan’ means any loan made under this part, including any such loan on which the borrower has defaulted. “(C) INITIAL QUALIFYING DATE.—The term ‘initial qualifying date’ means the date that is 6 months after the date of the enactment of the Comprehenseive Educational Reform Act. “(D) QUALIFIED BORROWER.—The term ‘qualified borrower’— “(i) with respect to a borrower who seeks to enter into an agreement under paragraph (2) on or before the initial qualifying date, means a borrower of an eligible Federal Direct loan who is not entitled to collect old-age insurance benefits under title II of the Social Security Act as of the date of the agreement under paragraph (2), including a borrower who is a defaulted borrower; and “(ii) with respect to a borrower who seeks to enter into an agreement under paragraph (2) after the initial qualifying date, means— “(I) a borrower of an eligible Federal Direct loan who is not entitled to collect old-age insurance benefits under title II of the Social Security Act as of the date of the agreement under paragraph (2), including a borrower who is a defaulted borrower; and “(II) who was eligible for a deferment under subsection (f)(2)(A) at any time during the five-year period preceding the date of the agreement under paragraph (2). “(E) STUDENT LOAN FORGIVENESS CREDIT.—The term ‘student loan forgiveness credit’ means the cancellation of the obligation of a qualified borrower to repay $550 in eligible Federal Direct loans in exchange for delayed eligibility for old-age insurance benefits as specified in title II of the Social Security Act (as amended by the Comprehensive Educational Reform Act).”. SECTION. 10. OPTIONAL DELAYED ELIGIBILITY FOR OLD-AGE INSURANCE BENEFITS. (a) Retirement Age; Early Retirement Age.—Section 216(l) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 416(l)) is amended by adding at the end the following: “(4) Notwithstanding the preceding paragraphs of this subsection, in the case of an individual who receives one or more student loan forgiveness credits under section 455(r) of the Higher Education Act of 1965— “(A) the retirement age with respect to such individual shall be deemed to be— “(i) the retirement age determined with respect to such individual under paragraph (1); plus “(ii) a number of additional months equal to the number of student loan forgiveness credits received by the individual under such section 455(r); and “(B) the early retirement age with respect to such individual shall be deemed to be— “(i) the early retirement age determined with respect to such individual under paragraph (2); plus “(ii) a number of additional months equal to the number of student loan forgiveness credits received by the individual under such section 455(r).”. (b) Delayed Retirement Credits.—Section 202(w) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 402(w)) is amended by inserting after “age 70” each place it appears the following: “(or, in the case of an individual described in paragraph (4) of section 216(l), age 70 plus the number of additional months determined under subparagraph (A)(ii) of such paragraph)”. (c) Voluntary Suspension Of Benefits.—Section 202(z) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 402(z)) is amended by inserting after “the age of 70” the following: “(or, in the case of an individual described in paragraph (4) of section 216(l), the age of 70 plus the number of additional months determined under subparagraph (A)(ii) of such paragraph)”. SECTION. 11. OFFENDER EDUCATION RE-ENTRY PILOT PROGRAM. (a) Authorization.—The Attorney General, in consultation with the Secretary of Education, shall establish a pilot program for 5 years which makes grants to not more than 25 historically Black colleges and universities to provide educational programming to eligible offenders in order to facilitate re-entry into the community. (b) Application.—The chief executive officer of a historically Black college or university seeking a grant under this section shall submit to the Attorney General an application at such time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Attorney General may reasonably require. (c) Matching Funds.—The portion of the costs of a program provided by a grant under subsection (a) may not exceed 50 percent. The recipient of a grant under this section may meet the matching requirement under this subsection by making in-kind contributions of goods or services that are directly related to the purpose for which such grant was awarded. (d) Definitions.—In this section: (1) The term “educational programming” means— (A) general education development (GED) programming; or (B) educational courses which are transferable for course credit at that historically Black college or university. (2) The term “eligible offender” means an individual who was convicted of a criminal offense and— (A) has been released from incarceration for not longer than one year; or (B) is scheduled to be released from incarceration in not longer than one year. (3) The term “historically Black college or university” has the meaning given the term “part B institution” under section 322(2) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1061(2)). (4) The term “institution of higher education” has the meaning given that term in section 101 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001). (e) Prohibition On New Authorization Of Funds.—This section shall be carried out using amounts otherwise appropriated or made available to the Department of Justice. No additional funds are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section. SECTION. 12. VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND MENTAL HEALTH SUPPORT. (a) State Uses Of Funds.—Section 2101(c)(4)(B) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6611(c)(4)(B)) is amended— (1) by redesignating clause (xxi) as clause (xxiv); and (2) by inserting after clause (xx) the following: “(xxi) Supporting efforts to increase the professional development that is evidence-based (to the extent the State, in consultation with local educational agencies in the State, determines that such evidence is reasonably available) for teachers, principals, school leaders, and other school personnel in mental health awareness, violence prevention, crisis response, de-escalation techniques and anger management techniques, positive behavioral interventions and supports, bullying and harassment prevention, and other similar programs designed to reduce and prevent school violence. “(xxii) Assisting local educational agencies in— “(I) developing and implementing professional development that is evidence-based (to the extent the State, in consultation with local educational agencies in the State, determines that such evidence is reasonably available) on violence prevention programs and emergency response and notification systems; and “(II) improving school climate. “(xxiii) Developing agreements between local educational agencies, law enforcement agencies, and health agencies, including nonprofit, public, and private mental health agencies and institutions, to improve coordination of services and to identify, respond to, and prevent threats to the safety of students and school personnel.”. (b) Local Uses Of Funds.—Section 2103(b)(3) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6613(b)(3)) is amended— (1) in subparagraph (I)— (A) in clause (ii), by inserting “, including mental health services,” after “services”; and (B) in clause (iii), by striking “and public or private mental health organizations” and inserting “, public or private mental health organizations, and local law enforcement agencies, to improve the coordination of services and to identify, respond to, and prevent threats to the safety of students and school personnel”; (2) in subparagraph (O), by striking “and” after the semicolon; (3) by redesignating subparagraph (P) as subparagraph (R); and (4) by inserting after subparagraph (O) the following: “(P) reducing the ratio of students to counselors to improve the ability of schools to address the academic and social and emotional needs of students and school personnel through the recruiting and hiring of school-based mental health services providers, as defined in section 4102(6); “(Q) developing and implementing professional development that is evidence-based (to the extent the State, in consultation with local educational agencies in the State, determines that such evidence is reasonably available) for teachers, specialized instructional support personnel, principals, school leaders, and other school personnel in violence prevention, mental health awareness, threat de-escalation methods, and positive behavioral interventions and supports, and supporting bullying and harassment prevention programs, and other similar programs designed to reduce and prevent school violence and improve the school climate for all students; and”. (c) Teacher And School Leader Incentive Fund Grants.—Section 2212(e)(2)(D) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6613(e)(2)(D)) is amended— (1) in clause (i)(III), by striking “or” after the semicolon; (2) in clause (ii), by striking the period at the end and inserting “; or”; and (3) by inserting after clause (ii) the following: “(iii) school-based mental health services providers (as defined in section 4102(6)) who improve the climate of the school.”. (d) Supporting Effective Educator Development.—Section 2242(a) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6672(a)) is amended— (1) in paragraph (1), by inserting “school-based mental health services providers (as defined in section 4102(6)),” after “teachers,”; and (2) in paragraph (5), by inserting “school-based mental health services providers (as defined in section 4102(6)),” after “teachers,”. “SECTION. 13. Decentralization IN ACADEMIC STANDARDS. “(a) In General.—No officer or employee of the Federal Government shall, through grants, contracts, or other cooperative agreements, mandate, direct, or control a State, local educational agency, or school’s specific instructional content, academic standards and assessments, curricula, or program of instruction (including any requirement, direction, or mandate to adopt the Common Core State Standards developed under the Common Core State Standards Initiative, any other academic standards common to a significant number of States, or any assessment, instructional content, or curriculum aligned to such standards), nor shall anything in this Act be construed to authorize such officer or employee to do so. “(b) No Requirement To Implement Assessments, Standards, Or Accountability Systems.—An officer or employee of the Federal Government shall not require a State educational agency, local educational agency, school, or Indian Tribe to implement an annual assessment, academic standard, or accountability system, or condition funds made available under this part upon such implementation.”. (b) Conforming Amendments.— (1) REPEAL OF STATE ASSESSMENT GRANTS.—Part B of title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1201 et seq.) is repealed. (2) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.—Section 1002 of such Act (20 U.S.C. 6302) is amended— (A) by striking the subsection heading for subsection (a) and inserting “State Educational Agency Grants For Eligible Children”; and (B) by striking subsection (b). SECTION. 14. REMITTANCE FEES FOR TEACHER PAY RAISE Section 920 of the Electronic Fund Transfer Act (relating to remittance transfers) (15 U.S.C. 1693o-1) is amended-- (1) by redesignating subsection (g) as subsection (h); and (2) by inserting after subsection (f) the following: ``(g) Teacher Pay Raise Remittance Fee Collection.-- ``(1) In general.-- ``(A) Fees.--If the designated recipient of a remittance transfer is located in a foreign country described in subparagraph (B), a remittance transfer provider shall collect from the sender of such remittance transfer a remittance fee equal to 10 percent of the United States dollar amount to be transferred (excluding any fees or other charges imposed by the remittance transfer provider). Except as provided in subparagraph (C), such remittance fees shall be submitted to the Treasury to be expended for the purpose of providing pay raises for public school teachers. ``(B) Foreign countries.--Subparagraph (A) shall apply to all foreign countries. ``(C) Costs.--For the 10-year period beginning on the date of the enactment of this subsection, a remittance transfer provider may retain up to 2 percent of any remittance fees collected by such remittance transfer provider pursuant to subparagraph (A) to cover the costs of collecting and submitting such remittance fees. ``(2) Fee collection system.--Not later than March 31st, 2020, the Bureau, in consultation with the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Secretary of the Treasury, and remittance transfer providers, shall develop and make available a system for remittance transfer providers to-- ``(A) submit the remittance fees collected in accordance with paragraph (1)(A) to the Treasury; and ``(B) retain a portion of such remittance fees in accordance with paragraph (1)(C). ``(3) Penalties.-- ``(A) Whoever, with the intent to evade a remittance fee to be collected in accordance with this subsection, and who has knowledge that, at the time of a remittance transfer, the value of the funds involved in the transfer will be further transferred to a recipient located in a country listed in paragraph (1)(B), requests or facilitates such remittance transfer to a designated recipient in a country that is not listed in paragraph (1)(B) shall be subject to a penalty of not more than $500,000 or twice the value of the funds involved in the remittance transfer, whichever is greater, or imprisonment for not more than 20 years, or both. ``(B) Any foreign country that, in the joint determination of the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Secretary of the Treasury, and the Secretary of State aids or harbors an individual conspiring to avoid the fee collected in accordance with this subsection shall be ineligible to receive foreign assistance and to participate in the visa waiver program or any other programs, at the discretion of the Secretaries described in this subparagraph.''. <all> SECTION. 15. REPEAL OF LIFO AND LOWER OF COST OR MARKET INVENTORY ACCOUNTING METHODS FOR FUNDING PURPOSES (a) LIFO and lower of cost or market will be repealed to appropriate increased revenue for the funding of the Comprehensive Educational Reform Act. (b) Additional revenue raised beyond the guidelines of the Comprehensive Educational Reform Act will be appropriated to the Department of Education to be spent at their discretion. SECTION. 16. INCREASE THE EXCISE TAX ON CIGARETTES BY FIFTY CENTS PER PACK FOR FUNDING PURPOSES (a) Federal excise tax on cigarettes will be increased by fifty cents per pack to appropriate increased revenue for the funding of the Comprehensive Educational Reform Act. (b) Additional revenue raised beyond the guidelines of the Comprehensive Educational Reform Act will be appropriated to the Department of Education to be spent at their discretion. SECTION. 17. GUIDELINES OF REVENUE APPRORIATIONS (a) Appropriations guidelines: (1) Section 3: $3,500,000,000 (2) Section 4: $200,000,000 (3) Section 5: $5,000,000,000 (4) Section 6: $1,000,000,000 (5) Section 7: $50,000,000 (6) Section 8: $25,000,000 (7) Section 11: $300,000,000 (b) Additionally $3,000,000,000 will be devoted to the creation of career/technical/vocational education, work experience, and apprenticeship programs in public high schools. (c) All funds raised by the bill will be granted out by the Department of Education to the states based on student population. SECTION. 18. CONSTITUTIONAL PASSAGE. The bill shall go into effect upon its constitutional passage.
  4. Phillip Huffines

    7th Docket Final Vote

    Does the house agree to the passage of these bills?
  5. Phillip Huffines

    2020 Campaign

    Huffines - 8 rallies in Maine for Macmillan 1 Business 2 Moderate Conservatives 1 Moderate Liberals 2 Progressives 2 Globalists 2 fundraisers in Texas King - 12 rallies in Pennsylvania for Macmillan 1 Nationalists 1 Evangelicals 1 Business 2 Moderate Conservatives 2 Moderate Liberals 2 SJW 2 Progressives 1 Globalists
  6. Shall the Senate agree to pass the Comprehensive Educational Reform Act?
  7. Phillip Huffines

    Fair Trade with China Enforcement Act

    Plain English summary: https://www.rubio.senate.gov/public/_cache/files/ef9a4b4e-d8f1-42c1-9518-f19dd655e2e2/CC3DCF9CF36386C313DDEF0F2BCDFDCA.one-pager-rubio-fair-trade-with-china-enforcement-act.pdf&amp;ved=2ahUKEwir4YL0ycLbAhUHWK0KHQUmA68QFjAAegQIBxAB&amp;usg=AOvVaw0vqP36vEzcNb8rdw85mXJt IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Mr. Huffines (for himself, Mr. Conaway, and Mr. Ryan) introduced the following bill; A BILL To safeguard certain technology and intellectual property in the United States from export to or influence by the People’s Republic of China and to protect United States industry from unfair competition by the People’s Republic of China, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS. (a) Short Title.—This Act may be cited as the “Fair Trade with China Enforcement Act”. (b) Table Of Contents.—The table of contents for this Act is as follows: Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents. Sec. 2. Sense of Congress. Sec. 3. Statement of policy. TITLE I—SAFEGUARDS AGAINST FOREIGN INFLUENCE IN UNITED STATES NATIONAL AND ECONOMIC SECURITY BY THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA Sec. 101. Establishment of list of certain products receiving support from Government of People’s Republic of China pursuant to Made in China 2025 policy. Sec. 102. Prohibition on export to People's Republic of China of national security sensitive technology and intellectual property. Sec. 103. Imposition of shareholder cap on Chinese investors in United States corporations. Sec. 104. Prohibition on use of certain telecommunications services or equipment. TITLE II—FAIR TRADE ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS WITH RESPECT TO THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA Sec. 201. Countervailing duties with respect to certain industries in the People's Republic of China. Sec. 202. Repeal of reduced withholding rates for residents of China. Sec. 203. Taxation of obligations of the United States held by the Government of the People’s Republic of China. Sec. 204. Surtax on certain income derived from China. SEC. 2. SENSE OF CONGRESS. It is the sense of Congress that— (1) since joining the World Trade Organization in 2001, the People’s Republic of China has offered the United States a contradictory bargain, which promised openness in the global trade order, but through state mercantilism delivered a severely imbalanced trading relationship; (2) it was erroneous for the United States Government to have ignored the contradictions and risks of free trade with the People’s Republic of China on the assumption that the People’s Republic of China would liberalize economically and politically; (3) benefitting enormously from a more open global economy to drive its own industries, the Government of the People’s Republic of China and the Communist Party of the People’s Republic of China have only tightened their grip on power, brutally suppressing dissent at home and pursuing policies abroad that are a far cry from being a responsible global stakeholder; (4) malevolent economic behavior by persons in the People’s Republic of China is made clear by the theft of intellectual property from the United States, as Chinese theft of United States intellectual property alone costs the United States nearly $600,000,000,000 annually, according to the United States Trade Representative; (5) stealing United States intellectual property advances the “Made in China 2025” initiative of the Government of the People’s Republic of China to eventually dominate global exports in 10 critical sectors, namely artificial intelligence and next-generation information technology, robotics, new-energy vehicles, biotechnology, energy and power generation, aerospace, high-tech shipping, advanced railway, new materials, and agricultural machinery, among others; (6) the targets of the Made in China 2025 initiative reveal the goal of the People’s Republic of China for the near-total displacement of advanced manufacturing in the United States; and (7) the United States Government should act to strengthen the position of the United States in its policy toward the People’s Republic of China in order to create a more balanced economic relationship by safeguarding strategic assets from Chinese influence, reducing Chinese involvement in the United States economy, and encouraging United States companies to produce domestically, instead of in the People’s Republic of China. SEC. 3. STATEMENT OF POLICY. It is the policy of the United States— (1) to impose restrictions on Chinese investment in the United States in strategic industries targeted by the Made in China 2025 initiative set forth by the Government of the People’s Republic of China; (2) to tax Chinese investment in the United States due to its negative effect on the United States trade deficit and wages of workers in the United States; (3) to increase the cost of transnational production operations in the People’s Republic of China in a manner consistent with the economic cost of the risk of loss of unique access by the United States to intellectual property, technology, and industrial base; and (4) to support democratization in and the human rights of the people of Hong Kong, including the findings and declarations set forth under section 2 of the United States-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992 (22 U.S.C. 5701). TITLE I—SAFEGUARDS AGAINST FOREIGN INFLUENCE IN UNITED STATES NATIONAL AND ECONOMIC SECURITY BY THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA SEC. 101. ESTABLISHMENT OF LIST OF CERTAIN PRODUCTS RECEIVING SUPPORT FROM GOVERNMENT OF PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA PURSUANT TO MADE IN CHINA 2025 POLICY. (a) In General.—Chapter 8 of title I of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2241 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following: “SEC. 183. LIST OF CERTAIN PRODUCTS RECEIVING SUPPORT FROM GOVERNMENT OF PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA. “(a) In General.—Not later than 120 days after the date of the enactment of the Fair Trade with China Enforcement Act, and every year thereafter, the United States Trade Representative shall set forth a list of products manufactured or produced in, or exported from, the People’s Republic of China that are determined by the Trade Representative to receive support from the Government of the People’s Republic of China pursuant to the Made in China 2025 industrial policy of that Government. “(b) Criteria For List.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—The Trade Representative shall include in the list required by subsection (a) the following products: “(A) Any product specified in the following documents set forth by the Government of the People’s Republic of China: “(i) Notice on Issuing Made in China 2025. “(ii) China Manufacturing 2025. “(iii) Notice on Issuing the 13th Five-year National Strategic Emerging Industries Development Plan. “(iv) Guiding Opinion on Promoting International Industrial Capacity and Equipment Manufacturing Cooperation. “(v) Any other document that expresses a national strategy or stated goal in connection with the Made in China 2025 industrial policy set forth by the Government of the People’s Republic of China, the Communist Party of China, or another entity or individual capable of impacting the national strategy of the People’s Republic of China. “(B) Any product receiving support from the Government of the People’s Republic of China that has or will in the future displace net exports of like products by the United States, as determined by the Trade Representative. “(2) INCLUDED PRODUCTS.—In addition to such products as the Trade Representative shall include pursuant to paragraph (1) in the list required by subsection (a), the Trade Representative shall include products in the following industries: “(A) Civil aircraft. “(B) Motor car and vehicle. “(C) Advanced medical equipment. “(D) Advanced construction equipment. “(E) Agricultural machinery. “(F) Railway equipment. “(G) Diesel locomotive. “(H) Moving freight. “(I) Semiconductor. “(J) Lithium battery manufacturing. “(K) Artificial intelligence. “(L) High-capacity computing. “(M) Quantum computing. “(N) Robotics. “(O) Biotechnology.”. (b) Clerical Amendment.—The table of contents for the Trade Act of 1974 is amended by inserting after the item relating to section 182 the following: “Sec. 183. List of certain products receiving support from Government of People’s Republic of China.”. SEC. 102. PROHIBITION ON EXPORT TO PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA OF NATIONAL SECURITY SENSITIVE TECHNOLOGY AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY. (a) In General.—The Secretary of Commerce shall prohibit the export to the People’s Republic of China of any national security sensitive technology or intellectual property subject to the jurisdiction of the United States or exported by any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. (b) Definitions.—In this section: (1) INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY.—The term “intellectual property” includes patents, copyrights, trademarks, or trade secrets. (2) NATIONAL SECURITY SENSITIVE TECHNOLOGY OR INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY.—The term “national security sensitive technology or intellectual property” includes the following: (A) Technology or intellectual property that would make a significant contribution to the military potential of the People’s Republic of China that would prove detrimental to the national security of the United States. (B) Technology or intellectual property necessary to protect the economy of the United States from the excessive drain of scarce materials and to reduce the serious inflationary impact of demand from the People’s Republic of China. (C) Technology or intellectual property that is a component of the production of products included in the most recent list required under section 183 of the Trade Act of 1974, as added by section 101(a), determined in consultation with the United States Trade Representative. (3) TECHNOLOGY.—The term “technology” includes goods or services relating to information systems, internet-based services, production-enhancing logistics, robotics, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, or computing. SEC. 103. IMPOSITION OF SHAREHOLDER CAP ON CHINESE INVESTORS IN UNITED STATES CORPORATIONS. Section 13(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78m(d)) is amended by adding at the end the following: “(7) (A) In this paragraph, the term ‘covered issuer’ means any issuer that produces components that may be used in the production of goods manufactured or produced in, or exported from, the People’s Republic of China and included in the most recent list required under section 183 of the Trade Act of 1974, determined in consultation with the United States Trade Representative. “(B) No covered issuer that is incorporated under the laws of a State, or whose principal place of business is within a State, may be majority-owned by a person whose principal place of business is in the People’s Republic of China. “(C) The prohibition in subparagraph (B) shall apply to any acquisition on or after the date of enactment of this paragraph.”. SEC. 104. PROHIBITION ON USE OF CERTAIN TELECOMMUNICATIONS SERVICES OR EQUIPMENT. (a) Findings.—Congress makes the following findings: (1) In its 2011 “Annual Report to Congress on Military and Security Developments Involving the People’s Republic of China”, the Department of Defense stated, “China’s defense industry has benefited from integration with a rapidly expanding civilian economy and science and technology sector, particularly elements that have access to foreign technology. Progress within individual defense sectors appears linked to the relative integration of each, through China’s civilian economy, into the global production and R&D chain … Information technology companies in particular, including Huawei, Datang, and Zhongxing, maintain close ties to the PLA.”. (2) In a 2011 report titled “The National Security Implications of Investments and Products from the People’s Republic of China in the Telecommunications Sector”, the United States China Economic and Security Review Commission stated that “[n]ational security concerns have accompanied the dramatic growth of China’s telecom sector. … Additionally, large Chinese companies—particularly those ‘national champions’ prominent in China’s ‘going out’ strategy of overseas expansion—are directly subject to direction by the Chinese Communist Party, to include support for PRC state policies and goals.”. (3) The Commission further stated in its report that “[f]rom this point of view, the clear economic benefits of foreign investment in the U.S. must be weighed against the potential security concerns related to infrastructure components coming under the control of foreign entities. This seems particularly applicable in the telecommunications industry, as Chinese companies continue systematically to acquire significant holdings in prominent global and U.S. telecommunications and information technology companies.”. (4) In its 2011 Annual Report to Congress, the United States China Economic and Security Review Commission stated that “[t]he extent of the state’s control of the Chinese economy is difficult to quantify … There is also a category of companies that, though claiming to be private, are subject to state influence. Such companies are often in new markets with no established SOE leaders and enjoy favorable government policies that support their development while posing obstacles to foreign competition. Examples include Chinese telecoms giant Huawei and such automotive companies as battery maker BYD and vehicle manufacturers Geely and Chery.”. (5) In the bipartisan “Investigative Report on the United States National Security Issues Posed by Chinese Telecommunication Companies Huawei and ZTE” released in 2012 by the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives, it was recommended that “U.S. government systems, particularly sensitive systems, should not include Huawei or ZTE equipment, including in component parts. Similarly, government contractors—particularly those working on contracts for sensitive U.S. programs—should exclude ZTE or Huawei equipment in their systems.”. (6) General Michael Hayden, who served as Director of the Central Intelligence Agency and Director of the National Security Agency, stated in July 2013 that Huawei had “shared with the Chinese state intimate and extensive knowledge of foreign telecommunications systems it is involved with”. (7) The Federal Bureau of Investigation, in a February 2015 Counterintelligence Strategy Partnership Intelligence Note stated that, “[w]ith the expanded use of Huawei Technologies Inc. equipment and services in U.S. telecommunications service provider networks, the Chinese Government’s potential access to U.S. business communications is dramatically increasing. Chinese Government-supported telecommunications equipment on U.S. networks may be exploited through Chinese cyber activity, with China’s intelligence services operating as an advanced persistent threat to U.S. networks.”. (8) The Federal Bureau of Investigation further stated in its February 2015 counterintelligence note that “China makes no secret that its cyber warfare strategy is predicated on controlling global communications network infrastructure”. (9) At a hearing before the Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives on September 30, 2015, Deputy Secretary of Defense Robert Work, responding to a question about the use of Huawei telecommunications equipment, stated, “In the Office of the Secretary of Defense, absolutely not. And I know of no other—I don't believe we operate in the Pentagon, any [Huawei] systems in the Pentagon.”. (10) At that hearing, the Commander of the United States Cyber Command, Admiral Mike Rogers, responding to a question about why such Huawei telecommunications equipment is not used, stated, “As we look at supply chain and we look at potential vulnerabilities within the system, that it is a risk we felt was unacceptable.”. (11) In March 2017, ZTE Corporation pled guilty to conspiring to violate the International Emergency Economic Powers Act by illegally shipping United States-origin items to Iran, paying the United States Government a penalty of $892,360,064 for activity between January 2010 and January 2016. (12) The Office of Foreign Assets Control of the Department of the Treasury issued a subpoena to Huawei as part of a Federal investigation of alleged violations of trade restrictions on Cuba, Iran, and Sudan. (b) Prohibition On Agency Use Or Procurement.—The head of an agency may not procure or obtain, may not extend or renew a contract to procure or obtain, and may not enter into a contract (or extend or renew a contract) with an entity that uses, or contracts with any other entity that uses, any equipment, system, or service that uses covered telecommunications equipment or services as a substantial or essential component of any system, or as critical technology as part of any system. (c) Report.—Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the Secretary of Commerce, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense and the United States Trade Representative, shall submit to Congress a report on sales by the Government of the People’s Republic of China of covered telecommunications equipment or services through partial ownership or any other methods. (d) Definitions.—In this section: (1) AGENCY.—The term “agency” has the meaning given that term in section 551 of title 5, United States Code. (2) COVERED TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT OR SERVICES.—The term “covered telecommunications equipment or services” means any of the following: (A) Telecommunications equipment produced by Huawei Technologies Company, ZTE Corporation, or any other Chinese telecom entity identified by the Director of National Intelligence, the Secretary of Defense, or the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation as a security concern (or any subsidiary or affiliate of any such entity). (B) Telecommunications services provided by such entities or using such equipment. (C) Telecommunications equipment or services produced or provided by an entity that the head of the relevant agency reasonably believes to be an entity owned or controlled by, or otherwise connected to, the Government of the People’s Republic of China. TITLE II—FAIR TRADE ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS WITH RESPECT TO THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA SEC. 201. COUNTERVAILING DUTIES WITH RESPECT TO CERTAIN INDUSTRIES IN THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA. (a) Policy.—It is the policy of the United States— (1) to reduce the import of finished goods from the People’s Republic of China relating to the Made in China 2025 plan set forth by the Government of the People’s Republic of China; and (2) to encourage allies of the United States to reduce the import of finished goods from the People’s Republic of China relating to the Made in China 2025 plan. (b) Inclusion Of Made In China 2025 Products In Definition Of Countervailable Subsidy.—Paragraph (5) of section 771 of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1677) is amended by adding at the end the following: “(G) TREATMENT OF CERTAIN CHINESE MERCHANDISE.—Notwithstanding any other provision of this title, if a person presents evidence in a petition filed under section 702(b) that merchandise covered by the petition is manufactured or produced in, or exported from, the People’s Republic of China and included in the most recent list required under section 183 of the Trade Act of 1974, determined in consultation with the United States Trade Representative, the administrating authority shall determine that a countervailable subsidy is being provided with respect to that merchandise.”. (c) Inclusion Of Made In China 2025 Products In Definition Of Material Injury.—Paragraph (7)(F) of such section is amended by adding at the end the following: “(iv) TREATMENT OF CERTAIN CHINESE MERCHANDISE.—Notwithstanding any other provision of this title, if a petition filed under section 702(b) alleges that an industry in the United States is materially injured or threatened with material injury or that the establishment of an industry in the United States is materially retarded by reason of imports of merchandise manufactured or produced in, or exported from, the People’s Republic of China and included in the most recent list required under section 183 of the Trade Act of 1974, determined in consultation with the United States Trade Representative, the Commission shall determine that material injury or such a threat exists.”. SEC. 202. REPEAL OF REDUCED WITHHOLDING RATES FOR RESIDENTS OF CHINA. (a) In General.—Section 894 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended— (1) by striking “The provisions of” in subsection (a) and inserting “Except as otherwise provided in this section, the provisions of”, and (2) by adding at the end the following new subsection: “(d) Exception For People’s Republic Of China.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—The rates of tax imposed under sections 871 and 881, and the rates of withholding tax imposed under chapter 3, with respect to any resident of the People’s Republic of China shall be determined without regard to any provision of the Agreement between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the People’s Republic of China for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and the Prevention of Tax Evasion with Respect to Taxes on Income, signed at Beijing on April 30, 1984. “(2) REGULATIONS.—The Secretary shall promulgate regulations to prevent the avoidance of the purposes of this subsection through the use of foreign entities.”. (b) Effective Date.—The amendments made by this section shall apply to income received after the date of the enactment of this Act. SEC. 203. TAXATION OF OBLIGATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES HELD BY THE GOVERNMENT OF THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA. (a) In General.—Section 892 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by redesignating subsection (c) as subsection (d) and by inserting after subsection (b) the following new subsection: “(c) Exception.—This section shall not apply to the Government of the People’s Republic of China.”. (b) Central Bank.—Section 895 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended— (1) by striking “Income” and inserting the following: “(a) In General.—Income”, and (2) by adding at the end the following new subsection: “(b) Exception.—This section shall not apply to the any central bank of the People's Republic of China.”. (c) Effective Date.—The amendments made by this section shall apply to income received or derived after the date of the enactment of this Act. SEC. 204. SURTAX ON CERTAIN INCOME DERIVED FROM CHINA. (a) In General.—Subpart D of part II of subchapter N of chapter 1 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by adding at the end the following new section: “SEC. 899. IMPOSITION OF SURTAX ON CERTAIN INCOME FROM CHINA. “(a) In General.—In addition to other taxes, there is imposed on the China source income of any applicable United States person a tax equal to 2 percent of such income. “(b) Applicable United States Person.—For purposes of this subsection, the term ‘applicable United States person’ means any United States person who— “(1) holds an investment through a partnership with a resident of the People’s Republic of China, or “(2) participates in a joint shareholding venture with a resident of the People’s Republic of China. “(c) China Source Income.—For purposes of this section, the term ‘China source income’ means any amount received from sources within the People’s Republic of China which is attributable to an investment described in subsection (b)(1) or a venture described in subsection (b)(2). Such amount shall be reduced so as to take into account deductions (including taxes) properly allocable to such income under rules similar to the rules of section 954(b)(5).”. (b) Tax Not Treated As Part Of Regular Tax Liability.—Section 26(b)(2) of such Code is amended by striking “and” at the end of subparagraph (X), by striking the period at the end of subparagraph (Y) and inserting “, and”, and by adding at the end the following new subparagraph: “(Z) section 899 (relating to surtax on certain income from China).”. (c) Clerical Amendment.—The table of sections for subpart D of part II of subchapter N of chapter 1 of such Code is amended by adding at the end the following new item: “Sec. 899. Imposition of surtax on certain income from China.”. (d) Effective Date.—The amendments made by this section shall apply to income received after the date of the enactment of this Act.
  8. Phillip Huffines

    Ending the Fentanyl Crisis Act

    N THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Mr. Huffines (For himself, Mr. Hill) introduced the following bill; A BILL To amend the Controlled Substances Act and the Controlled Substances Import and Export Act to modify the offenses relating to fentanyl, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Ending the Fentanyl Crisis Act”. SEC. 2. CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES ACT AMENDMENTS. Section 401(b)(1) of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 841(b)(1)) is amended— (1) in subparagraph (A)(vi)— (A) by striking “400” and inserting “20”; and (B) by striking “100” and inserting “5”; and (2) in subparagraph (B)(vi)— (A) by striking “40” and inserting “2”; and (B) by striking “10” and inserting “0.5”. SEC. 3. CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES IMPORT AND EXPORT ACT AMENDMENTS. Section 1010(b) of the Controlled Substances Import and Export Act (21 U.S.C. 960(b))— (1) in paragraph (1)(F)— (A) by striking “400” and inserting “20”; and (B) by striking “100” and inserting “5”; and (2) in paragraph (2)(F)— (A) by striking “40” and inserting “2”; and (B) by striking “10” and inserting “0.5”. SEC. 4. DIRECTIVE TO THE SENTENCING COMMISSION. (a) Definition.—In this section, the term the “Commission” means the United States Sentencing Commission. (b) Directive To The United States Sentencing Commission.—Pursuant to the authority of the Commission under section 994(p) of title 28, United States Code, and in accordance with this section, the Commission shall review and amend, if appropriate, the guidelines and policy statements of the Commission applicable to a person convicted of an offense under section 401 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 841) or section 1010 of the Controlled Substances Import and Export Act (21 U.S.C. 960) to ensure that the guidelines and policy statements are consistent with the amendments made by sections 2 and 3 of this Act. (c) Emergency Authority.—The Commission shall— (1) promulgate the guidelines, policy statements, or amendments provided for in this Act as soon as practicable, and in any event not later than 120 days after the date of enactment of this Act, in accordance with the procedure set forth in section 21(a) of the Sentencing Act of 1987 (28 U.S.C. 994 note), as though the authority under that Act had not expired; and (2) pursuant to the emergency authority provided under paragraph (1), make such conforming amendments to the Federal sentencing guidelines as the Commission determines necessary to achieve consistency with other guideline provisions and applicable law. SEC. 5. INTERDICTION OF FENTANYL, OTHER SYNTHETIC OPIOIDS, AND OTHER NARCOTICS AND PSYCHOACTIVE SUBSTANCES. (a) Definitions.—In this section— (1) the term “chemical screening device” means an immunoassay, narcotics field test kit, infrared spectrophotometer, mass spectrometer, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, Raman spec­tro­pho­to­me­ter, or other scientific instrumentation able to collect data that can be interpreted to determine the presence of fentanyl, other synthetic opioids, and other narcotics and psychoactive substances; (2) the term “express consignment operator or carrier” has the meaning given the term in section 128.1 of title 19, Code of Federal Regulations (or any successor regulation); and (3) the term “Postmaster General” means the Postmaster General of the United States Postal Service. (b) Interdiction Of Fentanyl, Other Synthetic Opioids, And Other Narcotics And Psychoactive Substances.— (1) CHEMICAL SCREENING DEVICES.—The Postmaster General shall— (A) increase the number of chemical screening devices that are available to the United States Postal Service; and (B) make additional chemical screening devices available to the United States Postal Service as the Postmaster General determines are necessary to interdict fentanyl, other synthetic opioids, and other narcotics and psychoactive substances that are illegally imported into the United States, including such substances that are imported through the mail or by an express consignment operator or carrier. (2) PERSONNEL TO INTERPRET DATA.—The Postmaster General shall dedicate the appropriate number of personnel of the United States Postal Service, including scientists, so that those personnel are available during all operational hours to interpret data collected by chemical screening devices. (c) Authorization Of Appropriations.—There is authorized to be appropriated to the Postmaster General $9,000,000 to ensure that the United States Postal Service has resources, including chemical screening devices, personnel, and scientists, available during all operational hours to prevent, detect, and interdict the unlawful importation of fentanyl, other synthetic opioids, and other narcotics and psychoactive substances.
  9. Phillip Huffines

    Military Pay Raise Act

    Mr. Huffines, for himself with thanks to Mr. McDaniel, introduced the following; A BILL To increase the pay rate for members of the United States Military. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. Short Title (a) From hereon out this bill shall be referred to as the "Military Pay Raise Act" SECTION 2. Findings (a) From 2011-2016 pay raises for members of the military did not increase by more that 2% per year, where every year from 1962-2011 saw raises of more then 2% each year [source]. (b) Real hourly earnings were up 2.2% in 2017 [source]. SECTION 3. Pay Raises (a) The basic pay shall be increased by 3% in FY 2019. SECTION 4. Effective Date The bill shall go into effect upon its constitutional passage.
  10. IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Mr. Huffines (For himself, Mr. Rokita) introduced the following bill; A BILL To amend title 18, United States Code, to provide penalties for certain obstructions of the enforcement of Federal immigration laws. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Stopping Lawless Actions of Politicians Act”. SEC. 2. CERTAIN OBSTRUCTIONS OF ENFORCEMENT OF IMMIGRATION LAWS. (a) Offense.—Chapter 73 of title 18, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following; “§ 1522. Certain obstructions of enforcement of immigration laws “Whoever, being a State or local official having custody of an individual, knowingly ignores a request from the Federal Government for the custody of that individual, if the requesting authority has designated that individual as a violator of the immigration laws, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than five years, or both”. (b) Clerical Amendment.—The table of sections at the beginning of chapter 73 is amended by adding at the end the following:
  11. Phillip Huffines

    English Language Unity Act

    IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Mr. Huffines (for himself, Mr. King of Iowa, Mr. Collins of Georgia, Mr. Gohmert, Mr. Barletta, Mr.Duncan of South Carolina, and Mr. Franks of Arizona) introduced the following bill; A BILL To declare English as the official language of the United States, to establish a uniform English language rule for naturalization, and to avoid misconstructions of the English language texts of the laws of the United States, pursuant to Congress’ powers to provide for the general welfare of the United States and to establish a uniform rule of naturalization under article I, section 8, of the Constitution. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “English Language Unity Act”. SEC. 2. FINDINGS. The Congress finds and declares the following: (1) The United States is comprised of individuals from diverse ethnic, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds, and continues to benefit from this rich diversity. (2) Throughout the history of the United States, the common thread binding individuals of differing backgrounds has been the English language. (3) Among the powers reserved to the States respectively is the power to establish the English language as the official language of the respective States, and otherwise to promote the English language within the respective States, subject to the prohibitions enumerated in the Constitution of the United States and in laws of the respective States. SEC. 3. ENGLISH AS OFFICIAL LANGUAGE OF THE UNITED STATES. (a) In General.—Title 4, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following new chapter: “CHAPTER 6—OFFICIAL LANGUAGE “§ 161. Official language of the United States “The official language of the United States is English. “§ 162. Preserving and enhancing the role of the official language “Representatives of the Federal Government shall have an affirmative obligation to preserve and enhance the role of English as the official language of the Federal Government. Such obligation shall include encouraging greater opportunities for individuals to learn the English language. “§ 163. Official functions of Government to be conducted in English “(a) Official Functions.—The official functions of the Government of the United States shall be conducted in English. “(b) Scope.—For the purposes of this section, the term ‘United States’ means the several States and the District of Columbia, and the term ‘official’ refers to any function that (i) binds the Government, (ii) is required by law, or (iii) is otherwise subject to scrutiny by either the press or the public. “(c) Practical Effect.—This section shall apply to all laws, public proceedings, regulations, publications, orders, actions, programs, and policies, but does not apply to— “(1) teaching of languages; “(2) requirements under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act; “(3) actions, documents, or policies necessary for national security, international relations, trade, tourism, or commerce; “(4) actions or documents that protect the public health and safety; “(5) actions or documents that facilitate the activities of the Bureau of the Census in compiling any census of population; “(6) actions that protect the rights of victims of crimes or criminal defendants; or “(7) using terms of art or phrases from languages other than English. “§ 164. Uniform English language rule for naturalization “(a) Uniform Language Testing Standard.—All citizens should be able to read and understand generally the English language text of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the laws of the United States made in pursuance of the Constitution. “(b) Ceremonies.—All naturalization ceremonies shall be conducted in English. “§ 165. Rules of construction “Nothing in this chapter shall be construed— “(1) to prohibit a Member of Congress or any officer or agent of the Federal Government, while performing official functions, from communicating unofficially through any medium with another person in a language other than English (as long as official functions are performed in English); “(2) to limit the preservation or use of Native Alaskan or Native American languages (as defined in the Native American Languages Act); “(3) to disparage any language or to discourage any person from learning or using a language; or “(4) to be inconsistent with the Constitution of the United States. “§ 166. Standing “A person injured by a violation of this chapter may in a civil action (including an action under chapter 151 of title 28) obtain appropriate relief.”. (b) Clerical Amendment.—The table of chapters at the beginning of title 4, United States Code, is amended by inserting after the item relating to chapter 5 the following new item: “Chapter 6. Official Language”. SEC. 4. GENERAL RULES OF CONSTRUCTION FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEXTS OF THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES. (a) In General.—Chapter 1 of title 1, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following new section: “§ 9. General rules of construction for laws of the United States “(a) English language requirements and workplace policies, whether in the public or private sector, shall be presumptively consistent with the laws of the United States. “(b) Any ambiguity in the English language text of the laws of the United States shall be resolved, in accordance with the last two articles of the Bill of Rights, not to deny or disparage rights retained by the people, and to reserve powers to the States respectively, or to the people.”. (b) Clerical Amendment.—The table of sections at the beginning of chapter 1of title 1, is amended by inserting after the item relating to section 8 the following new item: “9. General rules of construction for laws of the United States.”. SEC. 5. IMPLEMENTING REGULATIONS. The Secretary of Homeland Security shall, within 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, issue for public notice and comment a proposed rule for uniform testing English language ability of candidates for naturalization, based upon the principles that— (1) all citizens should be able to read and understand generally the English language text of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the laws of the United States which are made in pursuance thereof; and (2) any exceptions to this standard should be limited to extraordinary circumstances, such as asylum. SEC. 6. EFFECTIVE DATE. The amendments made by sections 3 and 4 shall take effect on the date that is 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act.
  12. Phillip Huffines

    Bonus Savings Act

    IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Mr. Huffines (for himself, Mr. Rokita , Mr. Marino, and Mr. Babin) introduced the following bill; A BILL To provide further tax relief for Americans receiving bonuses. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Bonus Savings Act”. SEC. 2. TAX RELIEF FOR BONUSES. (a) In General.—In the case of a taxable year beginning after January 1, 2020— (1) If an employee receives a bonus, amounts not to exceed a total of $2,500 annually of bonus income shall not be considered taxable earnings for the purposes of the employee’s Federal tax liabilities. (b) Definitions.—For purposes of this paragraph— (1) BONUS.—The term “bonus” means wages paid in addition to the compensation ordinarily given, required, optioned, or obligated under an employment contract.
  13. Phillip Huffines

    Cloture Vote: Comprehensive Educational Reform Act

    By a vote of 67 aye and 33 nay the motion for cloture passes. Final passage vote shall begin shortly.
  14. Phillip Huffines

    Senate Debate: VA Community Care Enhancement Act

    Mr. President, I motion for uc I yield
  15. Phillip Huffines

    Senate Debate: Earned Income Credit Act

    Mr. President, I motion for uc I yield
  16. Phillip Huffines

    Senate Debate: School Safety Act

    Mr. President, I motion for uc I yield
  17. Phillip Huffines

    Senate Debate: Return Free Filing for Taxpayers Act

    Mr. President, I motion for uc I yield
  18. Mr. President, I motion for uc I yield
  19. Phillip Huffines

    What should I put tariffs on next?

    Put a tariff on Canadian lumber
  20. Phillip Huffines

    June-July Campaigning

    Phillip Huffines for Dylan Macmillan - 6 rallies in Iowa 1 Evangelicals 1 Moderate Conservatives 2 Moderate Liberals 1 SJW 1 Progressives Russell King for Dylan Macmillan - 6 rallies in Pennsylvania 1 Evangelicals 1 Business 1 Moderate Conservatives 1 Moderate Liberals 1 SJW 1 Progressives
  21. Phillip Huffines

    Comprehensive Educational Reform Act

    Mr. Speaker, I propose the following amendments Replace section 15 with the following: SECTION. 15. REPEAL OF LIFO AND LOWER OF COST OR MARKET INVENTORY ACCOUNTING METHODS FOR FUNDING PURPOSES (a) LIFO and lower of cost or market will be repealed to appropriate increased revenue for the funding of the Comprehensive Educational Reform Act. (b) Additional revenue raised beyond the guidelines of the Comprehensive Educational Reform Act will be appropriated to the Department of Education to be spent at their discretion. Replace section 16 with the following SECTION. 16. INCREASE THE EXCISE TAX ON CIGARETTES BY FIFTY CENTS PER PACK FOR FUNDING PURPOSES (a) Federal excise tax on cigarettes will be increased by fifty cents per pack to appropriate increased revenue for the funding of the Comprehensive Educational Reform Act. (b) Additional revenue raised beyond the guidelines of the Comprehensive Educational Reform Act will be appropriated to the Department of Education to be spent at their discretion. Replace section 17 with the following SECTION. 17. GUIDELINES OF REVENUE APPRORIATIONS (a) Appropriations guidelines: (1) Section 3: $3,500,000,000 (2) Section 4: $200,000,000 (3) Section 5: $5,000,000,000 (4) Section 6: $1,000,000,000 (5) Section 7: $50,000,000 (6) Section 8: $25,000,000 (7) Section 11: $300,000,000 (b) Additionally $3,000,000,000 will be devoted to the creation of career/technical/vocational education, work experience, and apprenticeship programs in public high schools. (c) All funds raised by the bill will be granted out by the Department of Education to the states based on student population. Place the following after section 17 SECTION. 18. CONSTITUTIONAL PASSAGE. The bill shall go into effect upon its constitutional passage. I yield
  22. Phillip Huffines

    @Huffines

    Congratulations @CongressMac on winning the Republican Presidential nomination. I knew you had it in you when I endorsed you. This has been a hard fought victory. Now it's time to unite as a party and retain the White House in November.
  23. Phillip Huffines

    2020 Primary Donations

    Phillip Huffines $2.5 million Justin Amash $2.5 million Ron Ryckman Russell King $2.5 million Scott Pruitt $2.5 million Stacey Pickering
  24. Phillip Huffines

    Player Warchests

    Huffines donates $33 million to Dylan Macmillan
  25. Phillip Huffines

    VA Community Care Enhancement Act

    IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Mr. Huffines (for himself, Mr. Bilirakis, Ms. Kuster of New Hampshire, Mr. Arrington, Mr. Coffman, and Mr. Peters) introduced the following bill; A BILL To direct the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to carry out a demonstration program to provide expanded access to medical services through partnerships between Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers and Federally Qualified Health Centers, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “VA Community Care Enhancement Act”. SEC. 2. DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM ON EXPANDED AVAILABILITY OF MEDICAL SERVICES THROUGH CONTRACTS WITH FEDERALLY QUALIFIED HEALTH CENTERS. (a) Demonstration Program.—The Secretary of Veterans Affairs shall carry out a demonstration program under which the Secretary shall furnish certain medical services under chapter 17 of title 38, United States Code, through contracts between Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers and Federally Qualified Health Centers (hereinafter referred to as “FQHCs”). (b) Community-Care Collaborative Arrangements.—Under the demonstration program, the Secretary shall enter into contracts, on behalf of Department medical centers, with not less than five separate FQHCs that meet the selection criteria under subsection (c). Such a contract shall provide that— (1) a Department medical provider at the medical center may refer patients directly to the FQHC, without any requirement to consult with other agencies, offices, or units within the Department or with entities under contract with the Department; (2) all patient referrals to the FQHC are at the discretion of the Department medical provider, and the decision whether to accept such a referral will be at the discretion of the patient; (3) if a patient accepts such a referral, the FQHC agrees to accept the patient; (4) if the FQHC accepts the patient, the FQHC shall provide medical services to the patient only to the extent that such services are available from the FQHC pursuant to section 330 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 254b); (5) if a patient accepted by the FQHC is a veteran, the FQHC shall accept the family members of the veteran and shall provide care and services to such family members in accordance with chapter 17 of title 38, United States Code, if such family members are eligible for medical services under such chapter; (6) if a patient referred under the demonstration program is not eligible for a type of care or service needed by the patient under chapter 17 of title 38, United States Code, the FQHC agrees to provide such care or service to the patient, and accept payment for such care or service, in accordance with section 330 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 254b); (7) the FQHC agrees to provide to patients referred under the demonstration program— (A) in consultation with the Department medical center, appropriate education on what care and services may be provided to the patient under chapter 17 of title 38, United States Code, and what care and services may not be provided under such title; and (B) appropriate education on what care and services are provided under section 330 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 254b) and what care and services are not provided under such section; (8) the FQHC agrees to provide medical services to the veteran in a context that sufficiently takes into account the culture of members of the uniformed services, veterans, and family members and caregivers of members of the uniformed services and veterans, including the experience of combat and the experience of military sexual trauma; (9) the medical center and the FQHC agree to cooperate to ensure that patients referred under the demonstration program are patients of both the medical center and the FQHC and, for such purposes, to ensure interoperability, to the extent practicable, in terms of sharing the electronic health records of the patients; (10) the FQHC agrees to begin providing care and services to a referred patient promptly after receiving the referral, without regard to whether the patient has completed the process of enrolling in the patient enrollment system under section 1705 of title 38, United States Code; (11) with respect to a patient who is a veteran who has not completed such enrollment process as of the time the referral is made, the FQHC agrees to— (A) in coordination with the medical center, make available to the veteran assistance with the enrollment process; and (B) accept that reimbursement from the Secretary for providing care or services to the veteran will be delayed until after the enrollment process is completed; (12) the FQHC agrees to accept the financial risk that a patient referred under the demonstration program may not qualify for care or services furnished by the Secretary under title 38, United States Code; (13) the FQHC agrees to make available to referred patients, at one or more services sites of the FQHC and in accordance with the limitations on the scope of services applicable under section 330 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 245b)— (A) behavioral and mental health and substance abuse services; (B) women’s health services, including OBGYN services; (C) audiology; (D) HIV and hepatitis C treatment; (E) dental care; (F) optometry and ophthalmology; (G) pain management; (H) internal medicine; (I) cancer detection and screening; (J) podiatry; and (K) urgent care; (14) the FQHC agrees to provide additional services to referred patients to enable such patients to access medical services furnished under the demonstration program, including outreach and transportation services; (15) the Secretary agrees to provide timely reimbursement to the FQHC for medical services, provided to referred patients at the applicable rate for the State in which the FQHC is located under section 1902(bb) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1396a); (16) the FQHC agrees to undergo periodic audits in accordance with section 330 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 254b) and title XIX of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1396 et seq.); and (17) to the extent practicable, the medical center agrees to provide information to patients on the availability in such area of medical services through the participation of the FQHC in the demonstration program, including information on the particular services that are available from the FQHC and on the extent to which the patient will be required to make payments for such service. (c) Selection Criteria.— (1) IN GENERAL.—In order to select FQHCs with which to enter into contracts under subsection (b), the Secretary shall develop selection criteria. Such selection criteria shall— (A) take into account geographic and demographic differences across catchment areas, as defined by the Veterans Health Administration; (B) provide for the selection of one or more FQHCs that have not fewer than two service sites, including one service site in a highly rural area; (C) provide for the selection of one or more FQHCs that— (i) have a large number of service sites; (ii) have a service area— (I) in which a significant number of veterans reside; (II) that includes both rural and urban areas, and one or more Department medical centers; and (III) that is located within 100 miles of a military base; (iii) is participating in a network that— (I) provides connectivity with respect to electronic health records; and (II) includes one or more Department medical centers as participants; and (iv) has engaged in outreach to one or more Department medical centers toward collaborating on the provision of services to veterans; (D) require that a selected FQHC has the capability to assist veterans in navigating the benefits available to them under the laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs; and (E) require a selected FQHC to commit to establishing a program to educate health professionals employed by the FQHC on cultural competency in providing services to veterans. (2) APPROVAL OF CERTAIN FQHCS.—Each contract entered into under subsection (b) shall specify the date on which the FQHC agrees to begin providing medical services to patients referred by a medical provider at a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center under the contract. Such date may not be later than 180 days after the date on which the Secretary and the FQHC enter into the contract. (d) Coordination With Department Of Health And Human Services.—In carrying out the demonstration program under this section, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs shall consult with the Secretary of Health and Human Services (acting through the Administrator of the Health Resources and Services Administration), who shall provide to the Secretary of Veterans Affairs information on the capacity of FQHCs to serve veterans. With respect to FQHCs that are participating in such demonstration program, the Secretary of Health and Human Services may, subject to that availability of appropriations for such purpose, make payments to such FQHCs to increase such capacity. (e) Patient Enrollment.— (1) NON-ENROLLED VETERANS.—Notwithstanding subsection (c) of section 1705 of title 38, United States Code, the Secretary shall develop a process to refer veterans who are not enrolled in the patient enrollment system of the Department of Veterans Affairs under such section to an FQHC for the provision of medical services to the veteran under the pilot program. (2) FACILITATION OF ENROLLMENT.—The Secretary shall develop a process by which FQHCs that have entered into a contract with the Secretary under subsection (b) are able to facilitate the enrollment of veterans referred to the FQHC under paragraph (1) in such patient enrollment system. (f) Electronic Health Records.—The Secretary of Veterans Affairs shall provide notice to any veteran accepting a referral to an FQHC under the demonstration program that such acceptance shall serve as consent for the Department medical center and the FQHC to share electronic health records unless the veteran elects not to authorize such sharing of records using a form provided by the Secretary for such purpose. (g) Rule Of Construction.—Nothing in this section shall be construed as affecting— (1) any authority or obligation of the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to furnish medical services under chapter 17 of title 38, United States Code, to a patient who is referred to an FQHC under the demonstration program; (2) the eligibility of any individual to receive medical services under chapter 17 of title 38, United States Code; or (3) section 330 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 254b). (h) Funding.—No additional amounts are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section. The Secretary shall carry out the demonstration program using amounts otherwise available to the Secretary for Medical Community Care for fiscal years 2018 through 2022. (i) Duration; Termination.— (1) DURATION.—The Secretary of Veterans Affairs may enter into contracts under the demonstration program during the three-year period beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act. Such period may be extended or made permanent at the discretion of the Secretary. (2) PROVISION OF CARE.—If the Secretary terminates the demonstration program under this section, the Secretary shall ensure that patients receiving care or services through a FQHC pursuant to a contract entered into under subsection (b) are able to receive medical services provided by the FQHC under such contract until the conclusion of the relevant episode of care. (j) Definition Of Federally Qualified Health Center.—The term “Federally Qualified Health Center” means an entity receiving a grant under section 330 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 254b) or any other entity described in section 1861(aa)(4) of the Social Security Act.
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