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James Grant

CH Republicans
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  1. James Grant

    Lobbying and Campaign Finance Reform Act

    72 hours for debate
  2. Mr. Wilson, with regards to Mr. Swanner of Texas, Mr. BENNET of COLORADO, and Mr. GOSAR of ARIZONA, introduces: A BILL To provide limits on bundling, to reform the lobbyist registration process, to amend the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 to prohibit the acceptance by political committees of online contributions from certain unverified sources, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Lobbying and Campaign Finance Reform Act”. SEC. 2. LIMITATION ON BUNDLED CONTRIBUTIONS. (a) In General.—Section 315(a) of the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (52 U.S.C. 30116) is amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph: “(10) For purposes of paragraph (1), any bundled contribution (as defined in section 304(i)(8)) forwarded by a person described in section 304(i)(7) to a committee described in section 304(i)(6) shall be treated both as a contribution made by the person forwarding such contribution and as a contribution made by the contributor.”. (b) Definition Of Bundled Contribution.—Clause (ii) of section 304(i)(A) of such Act is amended by inserting “(whether in writing or otherwise)” after “other means”. (c) Effective Date.— (1) IN GENERAL.—The amendment made by subsection (a) shall take effect on the date of the enactment of this Act. (2) DEFINITION OF BUNDLED CONTRIBUTION.—The amendment made by subsection (b) shall take effect 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act. SEC. 3. LOBBYIST REGISTRATION REFORMS. Section 3(10) of the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1602(10)) is amended by striking “contact, other than” and all that follows through “3-month period.” and inserting “contact over a 2-year period.”. SEC. 4. BAN ON SOLICITING CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS FROM REGISTERED LOBBYISTS. Title III of the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (52 U.S.C. 30101 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following new section: “SEC. 325. SOLICITATIONS OF REGISTERED LOBBYISTS. “(a) Senate.—A candidate for the office of Senator, an individual holding the office of Senator, an agent of such a candidate or an individual holding such office, or an entity directly or indirectly established, financed, maintained, or controlled by or acting on behalf of 1 or more such candidates or individuals holding such office may not solicit from any registered lobbyist funds in connection with any election for the office of Senator during any period in which the Senate is in session. “(b) House Of Representatives.—A candidate for Representative to, or Representative in, or Delegate or Resident Commissioner to, the Congress, an individual holding such an office, an agent of a candidate or an individual holding such an office, or an entity directly or indirectly established, financed, maintained, or controlled by or acting on behalf of 1 or more such candidates or individuals holding such an office may not solicit from any registered lobbyist funds in connection with any election for Representative to, or Representative in, or Delegate or Resident Commissioner to, the Congress during any period in which the House of Representatives is in session. “(c) Registered Lobbyist.—For purposes of this section, the term ‘registered lobbyist’ means any person who is described in subparagraph (A), (B), or (C) of section 304(i)(7). “(d) Determination Of When Body Is In Session.—For purposes of this section, the Senate or House of Representatives shall be considered to be in session during any period unless such body has adjourned for, or is in recess for, a period of 10 calendar days or longer.”. SEC. 5. REQUIRING DISCLOSURE OF CREDIT VERIFICATION VALUE AS CONDITION OF ACCEPTANCE OF ONLINE CONTRIBUTIONS TO FEDERAL ELECTION. (a) In General.—Section 302 of the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (52 U.S.C. 30102) is amended by adding at the end the following: “(j)(1) No political committee shall accept any Internet credit card contribution unless— “(A) the individual or entity making such contribution is required, at the time such individual makes such contribution, to disclose the credit verification value of such credit card; and “(B)(i) the billing address associated with such credit card is located in the United States; or “(ii) in the case of a contribution made by an individual who is a United States citizen living outside of the United States, the individual provides the committee with the United States mailing address the individual uses for voter registration purposes. “(2) Notwithstanding subsection (b) or (c), in the case of an Internet credit card contribution— “(A) no later than 10 days after receiving the contribution, the person who receives the contribution shall forward to the treasurer such contribution, the name and address of the person making the contribution, and the date of receipt; and “(B) the treasurer of a political committee shall keep an account of the name and address of any person making any such contribution, together with the date and amount of such contribution by any person. “(3) In this subsection, the term ‘Internet credit card contribution’ means a contribution that— “(A) is made using a credit card; and “(B) is received through an Internet website.”. (b) Effective Date.—The amendment made by subsection (a) shall apply with respect to contributions made after the expiration of the 180-day period which begins on the date of the enactment of this Act. SEC. 6. ENACTMENT. This bill shall become law immediately following its Constitutional passage. PES: Amends the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (FECA) to declare that, for purposes of dollar limits on contributions, any bundled contribution forwarded by a currently registered lobbyist or a political committee established or controlled by one to an authorized committee of a candidate, a leadership political action committee, or a political party committee shall be treated as both a contribution made by the person forwarding it and as a contribution made by the contributor. Amends the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 to revise the definition of "lobbyist" with respect to its exemption from coverage of certain individuals whose lobbying activities constitute less than 20% of the time engaged in the services provided to a client over a 3-month period. Extends the 3-month period into a 2-year period. Amends FECA to prohibit House of Representatives and Senate candidates, Members, Senators, their agents, or any entities directly or indirectly established, financed, maintained, or controlled by or acting on behalf of one or more of them from soliciting funds from any registered lobbyist in connection with an election to the House or Senate during any period in which the chamber is in session (excluding adjournments or recesses for 10 calendar days or longer). Amends the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 to prohibit political committees from accepting any Internet credit card contribution unless: - the individual or entity making the contribution is required, at the time of the contribution, to disclose the credit card's verification value; and - the billing address associated with the card is located in the United States or, if the contribution comes from an individual U.S. citizen living outside of the United States, the individual gives the committee the U.S. mailing address he or she uses for voter registration. In the case of an Internet credit card contribution: - the person receiving the contribution shall forward it to the treasurer of the political comittee within 10 days, together with the name and address of the contributor and the date of receipt; and - the treasurer shall keep an account of the contributor's name and address, together with the date and amount of the contribution.
  3. James Grant

    Expanding American Agricultural Trade and Exports Act

    72 hours for debate
  4. IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES Mr. Wilson (for himself, Mr. Faulhammer , Mr. Newhouse , Mr. Marshall, Mr. Thomas J. Rooney of Florida, Ms. Pingree, Mr. Panetta, and Mrs. Bustos) introduced the following bill; A BILL To amend the Agricultural Trade Act of 1978 to extend and expand the Market Access Program and the Foreign Market Development Program. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Expanding American Agricultural Trade and Exports Act” SEC. 2. FINDINGS. The Congress finds the following: (1) Between 1977 and 2014, the export promotion programs of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) have added $8.15 billion on average every year to the value of United States agricultural exports, equal to a total of $309.7 billion, or 15.3 percent, in additional export revenue. (2) Between 1977 and 2014, USDA export promotion programs have generated a net return of $28.30 for every dollar invested; and between 2002 and 2014, under a less than full employment scenario, the programs have annually added an average of 2.7 percent, or $8.4 billion, to farm cash receipts, and contributed up to 239,800 full and part-time jobs across the United States economy. (3) Between 2002 and 2014, USDA export promotion programs have added up to $39.3 billion in gross economic output and up to $16.9 billion in gross domestic product under a less than full employment scenario. (4) Communities across the United States, producing agricultural commodities as varied as apples, cotton, beef, soybeans, rice, wheat, dairy, corn, citrus, wine, pork, peanuts, cranberries, lentils, tree nuts, timber, poultry, potatoes, and seafood, have utilized USDA export promotion programs to increase their foreign market access. (5) Private sector contributions have helped maintain the public-private partnership between USDA and private agricultural groups as the effective available funds from USDA have declined, with private contributions representing approximately 70 percent of the funds available for export promotion in 2014. (6) Foreign competitors have expanded their own agricultural export promotion programs at a far faster rate than the United States, placing United States producers at a competitive disadvantage in international markets. (7) The economic impact of USDA export promotion programs has eroded in recent years, as funding for the Market Access Program has remained static since 2006, and funding for the Foreign Market Development Program has remained static since 2002, while inflation has increased. (8) A recent academic analysis found that doubling public funding for the Market Access Program and the Foreign Market Development Program, coupled with increasing private contributions ranging from 10 to 50 percent, would result in average annual gains in agricultural exports from $3.4 to $4.5 billion, and would result in average annual gains in gross domestic product from $4.5 to $6.0 billion under a less than full employment scenario. SEC. 3. MARKET ACCESS PROGRAM. Section 211(c)(1)(A) of the Agricultural Trade Act of 1978 (7 U.S.C. 5641(c)(1)(A)) is amended by striking “not more than” and all that follows through “through 2018” and inserting “not more than $200,000,000 for fiscal year 2018, $240,000,000 for fiscal year 2019, $280,000,000 for fiscal year 2020, $320,000,000 for fiscal year 2021, $360,000,000 for fiscal year 2022, and $400,000,000 for fiscal year 2023”. SEC. 4. FOREIGN MARKET DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. Section 703(a) of the Agricultural Trade Act of 1978 (7 U.S.C. 5723(a)) is amended by striking “$34,500,000 for each of fiscal years 2008 through 2018” and inserting “$34,500,000 for fiscal year 2018, $41,400,000 for fiscal year 2019, $48,300,000 for fiscal year 2020, $55,200,000 for fiscal year 2021, $62,100,000 for fiscal year 2022, and $69,000,000 for fiscal year 2023”.
  5. James Grant

    ALERT Act

    72 hours for debate
  6. James Grant

    ALERT Act

    IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES Mr. Wilson (for himself, Mr. Grant, Mr. Loudermilk, Mr. Fleischmann, Mr. Katko, Mr. Keating, Mr. Hurd, Ms. Sinema, Mr. Ratcliffe, and Ms. McSally) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Homeland Security A BILL To authorize the Secretary of Homeland Security to provide counter-radicalization training to Department of Homeland Security representatives at State and local fusion centers, to amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish in the Department of Homeland Security a board to coordinate and integrate departmental intelligence, activities, and policy related to counterterrorism, to require the Secretary of Homeland Security to use the testimonials of former violent extremists or their associates in order to counter terrorist recruitment and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Amplifying Local Efforts to Root out Terror Act” or the “ALERT Act”. SEC. 2. COUNTER-RADICALIZATION TRAINING. (a) Authorization Of Training.—The Secretary of Homeland Security is authorized to provide training for personnel, including Department of Homeland Security personnel and State, local, tribal, and territorial representatives at State and major urban area fusion centers for the purpose of administering community awareness briefings and related activities in furtherance of the Department’s efforts to counter radicalization, identify and report suspicious activities, and increase awareness of and more quickly identify terrorism threats, including the travel or attempted travel of individuals from the United States to support a foreign terrorist organization (designated pursuant to section 219 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1189)) abroad. (b) Coordination.—To the extent practicable, in providing the training under subsection (a), the Secretary of Homeland Security shall coordinate with the heads of other Federal agencies engaged in community outreach related to countering radicalization, and shall also coordinate with such agencies in the administration of related activities, including community awareness briefings. SEC. 3. COUNTER-RADICALIZATION ASSESSMENT. (a) Assessment Required.—Not later than 120 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with appropriate State, local, tribal, and territorial representatives, shall assess the efforts of the Department of Homeland Security to support efforts to counter radicalization at the State, local, tribal, and territorial levels. Such assessment shall include each of the following: (1) A cataloging of Department efforts to assist State, local, tribal, and territorial governments to counter radicalization. (2) A review of cooperative agreements between the Department and such governments relating to countering radicalization. (3) An evaluation of Department plans and any potential opportunities to better support such governments that are in furtherance of the Department’s countering radicalization objectives and are consistent with all relevant constitutional, legal, and privacy protections. (b) Submission To Congress.—Not later than 150 days after the date of the enactment of this Act and consistent with the protection of classified information, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees the findings of the assessment required under subsection (a), together with any related information regarding best practices for countering radicalization at the State, local, tribal, and territorial levels. SEC. 4. DEPARTMENT-SPONSORED CLEARANCES. Not later than 30 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall notify the appropriate congressional committees of the number of employees of State, local, tribal, and territorial governments with security clearances sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security. Such notification shall include a detailed list of the agencies that employ such employees, the levels of clearance held by such employees, and whether such employees are assigned as representatives to State and major urban area fusion centers. SEC. 5. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY COUNTERTERRORISM ADVISORY BOARD. (a) In General.—At the end of subtitle A of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 121 et seq.) insert the following new section: “SEC. 210G. DEPARTMENTAL COORDINATION ON COUNTERTERRORISM. “(a) Establishment.—There is in the Department a board to be composed of senior representatives of departmental operational components and headquarters elements. The purpose of the board shall be to coordinate and integrate departmental intelligence, activities, and policy related to the counterterrorism mission and functions of the Department. “(b) Charter.—There shall be a charter to govern the structure and mission of the board. Such charter shall direct the board to focus on the current threat environment and the importance of aligning departmental counterterrorism activities under the Secretary’s guidance. The charter shall be reviewed and updated every four years, as appropriate. “(c) Members.— “(1) CHAIR.—The Secretary shall appoint a Coordinator for Counterterrorism within the Department who will serve as the chair of the board. “(2) ADDITIONAL MEMBERS.—The Secretary shall appoint additional members of the board from among the following: “(A) The Transportation Security Administration. “(B) United States Customs and Border Protection. “(C) United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement. “(D) The Federal Emergency Management Agency. “(E) The Coast Guard. “(F) United States Citizenship and Immigration Services. “(G) The United States Secret Service. “(H) The National Protection and Programs Directorate. “(I) The Office of Operations Coordination. “(J) The Office of the General Counsel. “(K) The Office of Intelligence and Analysis. “(L) The Office of Policy. “(M) The Science and Technology Directorate. “(N) Other Departmental offices and programs as determined appropriate by the Secretary. “(d) Meetings.—The board shall meet on a regular basis to discuss intelligence and coordinate ongoing threat mitigation efforts and departmental activities, including coordination with other Federal, State, local, tribal, territorial, and private sector partners, and shall make recommendations to the Secretary. “(e) Terrorism Alerts.—The board shall advise the Secretary on the issuance of terrorism alerts pursuant to section 203 of this Act. “(f) Prohibition On Additional Funds.—No additional funds are authorized to carry out this section.”. (b) Clerical Amendment.—The table of contents in section 1(b) of such Act is amended by inserting after the item relating to section 210F the following new item: SEC. 6. TESTIMONIALS (a) In General.—The Secretary of Homeland Security shall incorporate, to the extent practicable, into Department of Homeland Security efforts to combat terrorist recruitment and communications the public testimonials of former violent extremists or their associates, including friends and family. Such efforts may include the following: (1) Counter-messaging of foreign terrorist organization communications and narratives. (2) Related community engagement and public education efforts. (b) Coordination.—The Secretary of Homeland Security shall coordinate the efforts described in subsection (a) with the heads of other Federal departments and agencies, as appropriate, and, to the extent practicable, engage nongovernmental and international partners in the identification and use of testimonials described in such subsection. (c) Rule Of Construction.—Nothing in this Act may be construed to require the Secretary of Homeland Security to collect testimonials directly from former violent extremists or their associates, including friends and family. SEC. 7. NO ADDITIONAL FUNDS AUTHORIZED. No additional funds are authorized to carry out the requirements of this Act. Such requirements shall be carried out using amounts otherwise authorized. SEC. 8. DEFINITIONS. In this Act: (1) The term “appropriate congressional committees” means— (A) the Committee on Homeland Security and the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives; and (B) the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs and the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate. (2) The term “radicalization” means ideologically motivated international terrorism or domestic terrorism, as such terms are defined in section 2331 of title 18, United States Code.
  7. James Grant

    Close the Revolving Door Act

    72 hours for debate
  8. James Grant

    Close the Revolving Door Act

    Mr. Wilson, with thanks Mr. Swanner and Mr. Bennet, submits A BILL To provide greater controls and restrictions on revolving door lobbying. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Close the Revolving Door Act”. SEC. 2. LIFETIME BAN ON MEMBERS OF CONGRESS FROM LOBBYING. (a) In General.—Section 207(e)(1) of title 18, United States Code, is amended to read as follows: “(1) MEMBERS OF CONGRESS.—Any person who is a Senator, a Member of the House of Representatives, or an elected officer of the Senate or the House of Representatives and who, after that person leaves office, knowingly makes, with the intent to influence, any communication to or appearance before any Member, officer, or employee of either House of Congress or any employee of any other legislative office of the Congress, on behalf of any other person (except the United States) in connection with any matter on which such former Senator, Member, or elected official seeks action by a Member, officer, or employee of either House of Congress, in his or her official capacity, shall be punished as provided in section 216 of this title.”. (b) Conforming Amendments.—Section 207(e)(2) of title 18, United States Code, is amended— (1) in the heading, by striking “OFFICERS AND STAFF” and inserting “STAFF”; (2) by striking “an elected officer of the Senate, or”; (3) by striking “leaves office or employment” and inserting “leaves employment”; and (4) by striking “former elected officer or”. SEC. 3. CONGRESSIONAL STAFF. Paragraphs (2), (3)(A), (4), (5)(A), and (6)(A) of section 207(e) of title 18, United States Code, are each amended by striking “1 year” and inserting “6 years”. SEC. 4. IMPROVED REPORTING OF LOBBYISTS’ ACTIVITIES. Section 6 of the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1605) is amended by adding at the end the following: “(c) Joint Web Site.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—The Secretary of the Senate and the Clerk of the House of Representatives shall maintain a joint lobbyist disclosure Internet database for information required to be publicly disclosed under this Act which shall be an easily searchable Web site called lobbyists.gov with a stated goal of simplicity of usage. “(2) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.—There is authorized to be appropriated to carry out this subsection $100,000 for fiscal year 2017.”. SEC. 5. LOBBYIST REVOLVING DOOR TO CONGRESS. (a) Definitions.—In this section— (1) the term “foreign principal” has the meaning given that term under section 1(b) of the Foreign Agents Registration Act of 1938 (22 U.S.C. 611(b)); (2) the terms “lobbyist” and “lobbying contact” have the meanings given such terms under section 3 of the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1602); and (3) the term “registered lobbyist” means a lobbyist registered under the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.). (b) Prohibition.—Any person who is a registered lobbyist or an agent of a foreign principal may not, within 6 years after that person leaves such position, be hired by a Member or committee of either House of Congress with whom the registered lobbyist or agent of a foreign principal has had substantial lobbying contact. (c) Waiver.—This section may be waived in the Senate or the House of Representatives by the Select Committee on Ethics of the Senate or the Committee on Standards of Official Conduct of the House of Representatives, respectively, based on a compelling national need. (d) Substantial Lobbying Contact.—For purposes of this section, in determining whether a registered lobbyist or agent of a foreign principal has had substantial lobbying contact within the applicable period of time, a Member or committee of either House of Congress shall take into consideration whether the individual's lobbying contacts have pertained to pending legislative business, or related to solicitation of an earmark or other Federal funding, particularly if such contacts included the coordination of meetings with the Member or committee, involved presentations to employees of the Member or committee, or participation in fundraising (except for the mere giving of a personal contribution). Simple social contacts with the Member or committee of either House of Congress and staff, shall not by themselves constitute substantial lobbying contacts. SEC. 6. REPORTING BY SUBSTANTIAL LOBBYING ENTITIES. The Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.) is amended by inserting after section 6 the following: “SEC. 6A. REPORTING BY SUBSTANTIAL LOBBYING ENTITIES. “(a) In General.—A substantial lobbying entity shall file on an annual basis with the Clerk of the House of Representatives and the Secretary of the Senate a list of each employee of, individual under contract with, or individual who provides paid consulting services to the substantial lobbying entity who is— “(1) a former Senator or a former Member of the House of Representatives; or “(2) another covered legislative branch official who— “(A) was paid not less than $100,000 in any 1 year as a covered legislative branch official; “(B) worked for a total of not less than 4 years as a covered legislative branch official; or “(C) had a job title at any time while employed as a covered legislative branch official that contained any of the following terms: ‘Chief of Staff’, ‘Legislative Director’, ‘Staff Director’, ‘Counsel’, ‘Professional Staff Member’, ‘Communications Director’, or ‘Press Secretary’. “(b) Contents Of Filing.—The filing required under this section shall contain a brief job description of each individual described in subsection (a) and an explanation of their work experience under subsection (a) that requires this filing. “(c) Improved Reporting Of Substantial Lobbying Entities.—The joint Web site being maintained by the Secretary of the Senate and the Clerk of the House of Representatives, known as lobbyists.gov, shall include an easily searchable database entitled ‘Substantial Lobbying Entities’ that includes information on all individuals described in subsection (a). “(d) Law Enforcement Oversight.—The Clerk of the House of Representatives and the Secretary of the Senate shall provide a copy of each filing under subsection (a) to the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia, to allow the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia to determine whether a substantial lobbying entity is underreporting the lobbying activities of its employees, individuals under contract, or individuals who provide paid consulting services. “(e) Substantial Lobbying Entity.—In this section, the term ‘substantial lobbying entity’ means an incorporated entity that employs more than 3 registered lobbyists during a filing period.”. SEC. 7. ENHANCED PENALTIES. Section 7(a) of the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1606(a)) is amended by striking “$200,000” and inserting “$500,000”. PES: This bill amends the federal criminal code to impose a lifetime ban on any former Senator, Member of the House of Representatives, or elected officer of the Senate or House of Representatives from lobbying any current Member, officer, or employee of Congress, or any employee of any other legislative office. (Currently, the ban is for two years after a Senator leaves office and one year after a Member of the House of Representatives leaves office.) The ban is extended from one to six years for officers and employees of the Senate, personal staff of Members, committee staff, leadership staff, and other legislative offices. A registered lobbyist or agent of a foreign principal may not be hired for a six-year period by a Member of Congress or a congressional committee with whom they have had a substantial lobbying contact. This bill also amends the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 to: (1) require a substantial lobbying entity (an incorporated entity that employs more than three registered lobbyists during a filing period) to file annual lists with Congress of former Members of Congress and certain highly paid legislative branch officials who provide paid consulting services to the lobbying entity, and (2) increase the civil penalty for violations of disclosure or reporting requirements of such Act.
  9. James Grant

    Attorney General Nomination

    By a vote of 46-54 the motion to extend debate 48 hours fails. Voting on the nomination will begin and last 72 hours.
  10. James Grant

    ALERT Act

    IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Mr. Grant (for himself, Mr. Loudermilk, Mr. Fleischmann, Mr. Katko, Mr. Keating, Mr. Hurd, Ms. Sinema, Mr. Ratcliffe, and Ms. McSally) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Homeland Security A BILL To authorize the Secretary of Homeland Security to provide counter-radicalization training to Department of Homeland Security representatives at State and local fusion centers, to amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish in the Department of Homeland Security a board to coordinate and integrate departmental intelligence, activities, and policy related to counterterrorism, to require the Secretary of Homeland Security to use the testimonials of former violent extremists or their associates in order to counter terrorist recruitment and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Amplifying Local Efforts to Root out Terror Act” or the “ALERT Act”. SEC. 2. COUNTER-RADICALIZATION TRAINING. (a) Authorization Of Training.—The Secretary of Homeland Security is authorized to provide training for personnel, including Department of Homeland Security personnel and State, local, tribal, and territorial representatives at State and major urban area fusion centers for the purpose of administering community awareness briefings and related activities in furtherance of the Department’s efforts to counter radicalization, identify and report suspicious activities, and increase awareness of and more quickly identify terrorism threats, including the travel or attempted travel of individuals from the United States to support a foreign terrorist organization (designated pursuant to section 219 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1189)) abroad. (b) Coordination.—To the extent practicable, in providing the training under subsection (a), the Secretary of Homeland Security shall coordinate with the heads of other Federal agencies engaged in community outreach related to countering radicalization, and shall also coordinate with such agencies in the administration of related activities, including community awareness briefings. SEC. 3. COUNTER-RADICALIZATION ASSESSMENT. (a) Assessment Required.—Not later than 120 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with appropriate State, local, tribal, and territorial representatives, shall assess the efforts of the Department of Homeland Security to support efforts to counter radicalization at the State, local, tribal, and territorial levels. Such assessment shall include each of the following: (1) A cataloging of Department efforts to assist State, local, tribal, and territorial governments to counter radicalization. (2) A review of cooperative agreements between the Department and such governments relating to countering radicalization. (3) An evaluation of Department plans and any potential opportunities to better support such governments that are in furtherance of the Department’s countering radicalization objectives and are consistent with all relevant constitutional, legal, and privacy protections. (b) Submission To Congress.—Not later than 150 days after the date of the enactment of this Act and consistent with the protection of classified information, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees the findings of the assessment required under subsection (a), together with any related information regarding best practices for countering radicalization at the State, local, tribal, and territorial levels. SEC. 4. DEPARTMENT-SPONSORED CLEARANCES. Not later than 30 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall notify the appropriate congressional committees of the number of employees of State, local, tribal, and territorial governments with security clearances sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security. Such notification shall include a detailed list of the agencies that employ such employees, the levels of clearance held by such employees, and whether such employees are assigned as representatives to State and major urban area fusion centers. SEC. 5. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY COUNTERTERRORISM ADVISORY BOARD. (a) In General.—At the end of subtitle A of title II of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 121 et seq.) insert the following new section: “SEC. 210G. DEPARTMENTAL COORDINATION ON COUNTERTERRORISM. “(a) Establishment.—There is in the Department a board to be composed of senior representatives of departmental operational components and headquarters elements. The purpose of the board shall be to coordinate and integrate departmental intelligence, activities, and policy related to the counterterrorism mission and functions of the Department. “(b) Charter.—There shall be a charter to govern the structure and mission of the board. Such charter shall direct the board to focus on the current threat environment and the importance of aligning departmental counterterrorism activities under the Secretary’s guidance. The charter shall be reviewed and updated every four years, as appropriate. “(c) Members.— “(1) CHAIR.—The Secretary shall appoint a Coordinator for Counterterrorism within the Department who will serve as the chair of the board. “(2) ADDITIONAL MEMBERS.—The Secretary shall appoint additional members of the board from among the following: “(A) The Transportation Security Administration. “(B) United States Customs and Border Protection. “(C) United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement. “(D) The Federal Emergency Management Agency. “(E) The Coast Guard. “(F) United States Citizenship and Immigration Services. “(G) The United States Secret Service. “(H) The National Protection and Programs Directorate. “(I) The Office of Operations Coordination. “(J) The Office of the General Counsel. “(K) The Office of Intelligence and Analysis. “(L) The Office of Policy. “(M) The Science and Technology Directorate. “(N) Other Departmental offices and programs as determined appropriate by the Secretary. “(d) Meetings.—The board shall meet on a regular basis to discuss intelligence and coordinate ongoing threat mitigation efforts and departmental activities, including coordination with other Federal, State, local, tribal, territorial, and private sector partners, and shall make recommendations to the Secretary. “(e) Terrorism Alerts.—The board shall advise the Secretary on the issuance of terrorism alerts pursuant to section 203 of this Act. “(f) Prohibition On Additional Funds.—No additional funds are authorized to carry out this section.”. (b) Clerical Amendment.—The table of contents in section 1(b) of such Act is amended by inserting after the item relating to section 210F the following new item: SEC. 6. TESTIMONIALS (a) In General.—The Secretary of Homeland Security shall incorporate, to the extent practicable, into Department of Homeland Security efforts to combat terrorist recruitment and communications the public testimonials of former violent extremists or their associates, including friends and family. Such efforts may include the following: (1) Counter-messaging of foreign terrorist organization communications and narratives. (2) Related community engagement and public education efforts. (b) Coordination.—The Secretary of Homeland Security shall coordinate the efforts described in subsection (a) with the heads of other Federal departments and agencies, as appropriate, and, to the extent practicable, engage nongovernmental and international partners in the identification and use of testimonials described in such subsection. (c) Rule Of Construction.—Nothing in this Act may be construed to require the Secretary of Homeland Security to collect testimonials directly from former violent extremists or their associates, including friends and family. SEC. 7. NO ADDITIONAL FUNDS AUTHORIZED. No additional funds are authorized to carry out the requirements of this Act. Such requirements shall be carried out using amounts otherwise authorized. SEC. 8. DEFINITIONS. In this Act: (1) The term “appropriate congressional committees” means— (A) the Committee on Homeland Security and the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives; and (B) the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs and the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate. (2) The term “radicalization” means ideologically motivated international terrorism or domestic terrorism, as such terms are defined in section 2331 of title 18, United States Code.
  11. James Grant

    Mark Rambor Holds Town Hall in Austin

    Mr. Rambor, Will you be running for President in 2020?
  12. James Grant

    Fair Trade Act

    Mr. Wilson, with thanks to Mr. Swanner and Mr. Levin, submits A BILL To amend title VII of the Tariff Act of 1930 to clarify that countervailing duties may be imposed to address subsidies relating to a fundamentally undervalued currency of any foreign country. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Fair Trade Act”. SEC. 2. CLARIFICATION REGARDING DEFINITION OF COUNTERVAILABLE SUBSIDY. (a) Benefit Conferred.—Section 771(5)(E) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1677(5)(E)) is amended— (1) in clause (iii), by striking “and” at the end; (2) in clause (iv), by striking the period at the end and inserting “, and”; and (3) by inserting after clause (iv) the following new clause: “(v) in the case in which the currency of a country in which the subject merchandise is produced is exchanged for foreign currency obtained from export transactions, and the currency of such country is a fundamentally undervalued currency, as defined in paragraph (37), the difference between the amount of the currency of such country provided and the amount of the currency of such country that would have been provided if the real effective exchange rate of the currency of such country were not undervalued, as determined pursuant to paragraph (38).”. (b) Export Subsidy.—Section 771(5A)(B) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1677(5A)(B)) is amended by adding at the end the following new sentence: “In the case of a subsidy relating to a fundamentally undervalued currency, the fact that the subsidy may also be provided in circumstances not involving export shall not, for that reason alone, mean that the subsidy cannot be considered contingent upon export performance.”. (c) Definition Of Fundamentally Undervalued Currency.—Section 771 of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1677) is amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph: “(37) FUNDAMENTALLY UNDERVALUED CURRENCY.—The administering authority shall determine that the currency of a country in which the subject merchandise is produced is a ‘fundamentally undervalued currency’ if— “(A) the government of the country (including any public entity within the territory of the country) engages in protracted, large-scale intervention in one or more foreign exchange markets during part or all of the 18-month period that represents the most recent 18 months for which the information required under paragraph (38) is reasonably available, but that does not include any period of time later than the final month in the period of investigation or the period of review, as applicable; “(B) the real effective exchange rate of the currency is undervalued by at least 5 percent, on average and as calculated under paragraph (38), relative to the equilibrium real effective exchange rate for the country’s currency during the 18-month period; “(C) during the 18-month period, the country has experienced significant and persistent global current account surpluses; and “(D) during the 18-month period, the foreign asset reserves held by the government of the country exceed— “(i) the amount necessary to repay all debt obligations of the government falling due within the coming 12 months; “(ii) 20 percent of the country’s money supply, using standard measures of M2; and “(iii) the value of the country’s imports during the previous 4 months.”. (d) Definition Of Real Effective Exchange Rate Undervaluation.—Section 771 of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1677), as amended by subsection (c) of this section, is further amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph: “(38) REAL EFFECTIVE EXCHANGE RATE UNDERVALUATION.—The calculation of real effective exchange rate undervaluation, for purposes of paragraph (5)(E)(v) and paragraph (37), shall— “(A) (i) rely upon, and where appropriate be the simple average of, the results yielded from application of the approaches described in the guidelines of the International Monetary Fund’s Consultative Group on Exchange Rate Issues; or “(ii) if the guidelines of the International Monetary Fund’s Consultative Group on Exchange Rate Issues are not available, be based on generally accepted economic and econometric techniques and methodologies to measure the level of undervaluation; “(B) rely upon data that are publicly available, reliable, and compiled and maintained by the International Monetary Fund or, if the International Monetary Fund cannot provide the data, by other international organizations or by national governments; and “(C) use inflation-adjusted, trade-weighted exchange rates.”. SEC. 3. REPORT ON IMPLEMENTATION OF ACT. (a) In General.—Not later than 9 months after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to Congress a report on the implementation of the amendments made by this Act. (b) Matters To Be Included.—The report required by subsection (a) shall include a description of the extent to which United States industries that have been materially injured by reason of imports of subject merchandise produced in foreign countries with fundamentally undervalued currencies have received relief under title VII of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1671 et seq.), as amended by this Act. SEC. 4. APPLICATION TO GOODS FROM CANADA AND MEXICO. Pursuant to article 1902 of the North American Free Trade Agreement and section 408 of the North American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act of 1993 (19 U.S.C. 3438), the amendments made by section 2 of this Act shall apply to goods from Canada and Mexico. PES: Amends the Tariff Act of 1930 to include as a "countervailable subsidy" requiring action under a countervailing duty or antidumping duty proceeding the benefit conferred on merchandise imported into the United States from foreign countries with fundamentally undervalued currency. Defines "benefit conferred," in cases where the currency of a foreign country is exchanged for foreign currency (i.e., U.S. dollars) obtained from export transactions, as the difference between: (1) the amount of currency provided by a foreign country in which the subject merchandise is produced, and (2) the amount of currency such country would have provided if the real effective exchange rate of its currency were not fundamentally undervalued. Declares that the fact that such a subsidy is also provided in circumstances not involving export shall not, for that reason alone, mean it cannot be considered export contingent and actionable under a countervailing duty and antidumping duty proceeding. Requires the administering authority to determine that the currency of a foreign country is fundamentally undervalued if for an 18-month period: (1) the government of the country engages in protracted, large-scale intervention in one or more foreign exchange markets; (2) the country's real effective exchange rate is undervalued by at least 5%; (3) the country has experienced significant and persistent global current account surpluses; and (4) the country's government has foreign asset reserves exceeding the amount necessary to repay all its debt obligations falling due within the coming 12 months, 20% percent of the country's money supply, and the value of the country's imports during the previous 4 months. Requires the use, for calculating a country's "real effective exchange rate undervaluation," of certain guidelines of the Consultative Group on Exchange Rate Issues of the International Monetary Fund or, if those guidelines are not available, generally accepted economic and econometric techniques and methodologies. Requires the use, also, of inflation-adjusted, trade-weighted exchange rates. Applies the amendments made by this Act to goods from Canada and Mexico.
  13. PES: legislation that would safeguard American assets from Chinese influence and possession, and blunt China’s tools of economic aggression 1. Prohibit the sale of national security sensitive technology and intellectual property to China. · 2. Increase taxes on multinational corporations’ income earned in China at a rate similar to the lost value of stolen IP and technology. · 3. Cancel an income tax treaty signed in the 1980s and tax China on their “investment” in the U.S., including their holdings of the national debt. · 4. Prepare duties on, and impose Chinese investor shareholding caps on U.S. companies producing, goods targeted by the Made in China 2025 plan. · 5. Prohibit the federal government, or subsidiaries/contractors, from purchasing telecommunications equipment or services from Huawei and ZTE. IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES Mr. Wilson (for himself with thanks to Mr. Faulhammer, Mr. Conaway, and Mr. Ryan of Ohio) introduced the following bill; A BILL To safeguard certain technology and intellectual property in the United States from export to or influence by the People’s Republic of China and to protect United States industry from unfair competition by the People’s Republic of China, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS. (a) Short Title.—This Act may be cited as the “Fair Trade with China Enforcement Act”. (b) Table Of Contents.—The table of contents for this Act is as follows: Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents. Sec. 2. Sense of Congress. Sec. 3. Statement of policy. TITLE I—SAFEGUARDS AGAINST FOREIGN INFLUENCE IN UNITED STATES NATIONAL AND ECONOMIC SECURITY BY THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA Sec. 101. Establishment of list of certain products receiving support from Government of People’s Republic of China pursuant to Made in China 2025 policy. Sec. 102. Prohibition on export to People's Republic of China of national security sensitive technology and intellectual property. Sec. 103. Imposition of shareholder cap on Chinese investors in United States corporations. Sec. 104. Prohibition on use of certain telecommunications services or equipment. TITLE II—FAIR TRADE ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS WITH RESPECT TO THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA Sec. 201. Countervailing duties with respect to certain industries in the People's Republic of China. Sec. 202. Repeal of reduced withholding rates for residents of China. Sec. 203. Taxation of obligations of the United States held by the Government of the People’s Republic of China. Sec. 204. Surtax on certain income derived from China. TITLE III—STOPPING FOREIGN BUSINESSES SANCTUARY ACT Sec. 301. Jurisdiction over certain foreign entities. Sec. 302. Commercial activity of affiliate entities. SEC. 2. SENSE OF CONGRESS. It is the sense of Congress that— (1) since joining the World Trade Organization in 2001, the People’s Republic of China has offered the United States a contradictory bargain, which promised openness in the global trade order, but through state mercantilism delivered a severely imbalanced trading relationship; (2) it was erroneous for the United States Government to have ignored the contradictions and risks of free trade with the People’s Republic of China on the assumption that the People’s Republic of China would liberalize economically and politically; (3) benefitting enormously from a more open global economy to drive its own industries, the Government of the People’s Republic of China and the Communist Party of the People’s Republic of China have only tightened their grip on power, brutally suppressing dissent at home and pursuing policies abroad that are a far cry from being a responsible global stakeholder; (4) malevolent economic behavior by persons in the People’s Republic of China is made clear by the theft of intellectual property from the United States, as Chinese theft of United States intellectual property alone costs the United States nearly $600,000,000,000 annually, according to the United States Trade Representative; (5) stealing United States intellectual property advances the “Made in China 2025” initiative of the Government of the People’s Republic of China to eventually dominate global exports in 10 critical sectors, namely artificial intelligence and next-generation information technology, robotics, new-energy vehicles, biotechnology, energy and power generation, aerospace, high-tech shipping, advanced railway, new materials, and agricultural machinery, among others; (6) the targets of the Made in China 2025 initiative reveal the goal of the People’s Republic of China for the near-total displacement of advanced manufacturing in the United States; and (7) the United States Government should act to strengthen the position of the United States in its policy toward the People’s Republic of China in order to create a more balanced economic relationship by safeguarding strategic assets from Chinese influence, reducing Chinese involvement in the United States economy, and encouraging United States companies to produce domestically, instead of in the People’s Republic of China. SEC. 3. STATEMENT OF POLICY. It is the policy of the United States— (1) to impose restrictions on Chinese investment in the United States in strategic industries targeted by the Made in China 2025 initiative set forth by the Government of the People’s Republic of China; (2) to tax Chinese investment in the United States due to its negative effect on the United States trade deficit and wages of workers in the United States; (3) to increase the cost of transnational production operations in the People’s Republic of China in a manner consistent with the economic cost of the risk of loss of unique access by the United States to intellectual property, technology, and industrial base; and (4) to support democratization in and the human rights of the people of Hong Kong, including the findings and declarations set forth under section 2 of the United States-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992 (22 U.S.C. 5701). TITLE I—SAFEGUARDS AGAINST FOREIGN INFLUENCE IN UNITED STATES NATIONAL AND ECONOMIC SECURITY BY THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA SEC. 101. ESTABLISHMENT OF LIST OF CERTAIN PRODUCTS RECEIVING SUPPORT FROM GOVERNMENT OF PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA PURSUANT TO MADE IN CHINA 2025 POLICY. (a) In General.—Chapter 8 of title I of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2241 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following: “SEC. 183. LIST OF CERTAIN PRODUCTS RECEIVING SUPPORT FROM GOVERNMENT OF PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA. “(a) In General.—Not later than 120 days after the date of the enactment of the Fair Trade with China Enforcement Act, and every year thereafter, the United States Trade Representative shall set forth a list of products manufactured or produced in, or exported from, the People’s Republic of China that are determined by the Trade Representative to receive support from the Government of the People’s Republic of China pursuant to the Made in China 2025 industrial policy of that Government. “(b) Criteria For List.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—The Trade Representative shall include in the list required by subsection (a) the following products: “(A) Any product specified in the following documents set forth by the Government of the People’s Republic of China: “(i) Notice on Issuing Made in China 2025. “(ii) China Manufacturing 2025. “(iii) Notice on Issuing the 13th Five-year National Strategic Emerging Industries Development Plan. “(iv) Guiding Opinion on Promoting International Industrial Capacity and Equipment Manufacturing Cooperation. “(v) Any other document that expresses a national strategy or stated goal in connection with the Made in China 2025 industrial policy set forth by the Government of the People’s Republic of China, the Communist Party of China, or another entity or individual capable of impacting the national strategy of the People’s Republic of China. “(B) Any product receiving support from the Government of the People’s Republic of China that has or will in the future displace net exports of like products by the United States, as determined by the Trade Representative. “(2) INCLUDED PRODUCTS.—In addition to such products as the Trade Representative shall include pursuant to paragraph (1) in the list required by subsection (a), the Trade Representative shall include products in the following industries: “(A) Civil aircraft. “(B) Motor car and vehicle. “(C) Advanced medical equipment. “(D) Advanced construction equipment. “(E) Agricultural machinery. “(F) Railway equipment. “(G) Diesel locomotive. “(H) Moving freight. “(I) Semiconductor. “(J) Lithium battery manufacturing. “(K) Artificial intelligence. “(L) High-capacity computing. “(M) Quantum computing. “(N) Robotics. “(O) Biotechnology.”. (b) Clerical Amendment.—The table of contents for the Trade Act of 1974 is amended by inserting after the item relating to section 182 the following: “Sec. 183. List of certain products receiving support from Government of People’s Republic of China.”. SEC. 102. PROHIBITION ON EXPORT TO PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA OF NATIONAL SECURITY SENSITIVE TECHNOLOGY AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY. (a) In General.—The Secretary of Commerce shall prohibit the export to the People’s Republic of China of any national security sensitive technology or intellectual property subject to the jurisdiction of the United States or exported by any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. (b) Definitions.—In this section: (1) INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY.—The term “intellectual property” includes patents, copyrights, trademarks, or trade secrets. (2) NATIONAL SECURITY SENSITIVE TECHNOLOGY OR INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY.—The term “national security sensitive technology or intellectual property” includes the following: (A) Technology or intellectual property that would make a significant contribution to the military potential of the People’s Republic of China that would prove detrimental to the national security of the United States. (B) Technology or intellectual property necessary to protect the economy of the United States from the excessive drain of scarce materials and to reduce the serious inflationary impact of demand from the People’s Republic of China. (C) Technology or intellectual property that is a component of the production of products included in the most recent list required under section 183 of the Trade Act of 1974, as added by section 101(a), determined in consultation with the United States Trade Representative. (3) TECHNOLOGY.—The term “technology” includes goods or services relating to information systems, internet-based services, production-enhancing logistics, robotics, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, or computing. SEC. 103. IMPOSITION OF SHAREHOLDER CAP ON CHINESE INVESTORS IN UNITED STATES CORPORATIONS. Section 13(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78m(d)) is amended by adding at the end the following: “(7) (A) In this paragraph, the term ‘covered issuer’ means any issuer that produces components that may be used in the production of goods manufactured or produced in, or exported from, the People’s Republic of China and included in the most recent list required under section 183 of the Trade Act of 1974, determined in consultation with the United States Trade Representative. “(B) No covered issuer that is incorporated under the laws of a State, or whose principal place of business is within a State, may be majority-owned by a person whose principal place of business is in the People’s Republic of China. “(C) The prohibition in subparagraph (B) shall apply to any acquisition on or after the date of enactment of this paragraph.”. SEC. 104. PROHIBITION ON USE OF CERTAIN TELECOMMUNICATIONS SERVICES OR EQUIPMENT. (a) Findings.—Congress makes the following findings: (1) In its 2011 “Annual Report to Congress on Military and Security Developments Involving the People’s Republic of China”, the Department of Defense stated, “China’s defense industry has benefited from integration with a rapidly expanding civilian economy and science and technology sector, particularly elements that have access to foreign technology. Progress within individual defense sectors appears linked to the relative integration of each, through China’s civilian economy, into the global production and R&D chain … Information technology companies in particular, including Huawei, Datang, and Zhongxing, maintain close ties to the PLA.”. (2) In a 2011 report titled “The National Security Implications of Investments and Products from the People’s Republic of China in the Telecommunications Sector”, the United States China Economic and Security Review Commission stated that “[n]ational security concerns have accompanied the dramatic growth of China’s telecom sector. … Additionally, large Chinese companies—particularly those ‘national champions’ prominent in China’s ‘going out’ strategy of overseas expansion—are directly subject to direction by the Chinese Communist Party, to include support for PRC state policies and goals.”. (3) The Commission further stated in its report that “[f]rom this point of view, the clear economic benefits of foreign investment in the U.S. must be weighed against the potential security concerns related to infrastructure components coming under the control of foreign entities. This seems particularly applicable in the telecommunications industry, as Chinese companies continue systematically to acquire significant holdings in prominent global and U.S. telecommunications and information technology companies.”. (4) In its 2011 Annual Report to Congress, the United States China Economic and Security Review Commission stated that “[t]he extent of the state’s control of the Chinese economy is difficult to quantify … There is also a category of companies that, though claiming to be private, are subject to state influence. Such companies are often in new markets with no established SOE leaders and enjoy favorable government policies that support their development while posing obstacles to foreign competition. Examples include Chinese telecoms giant Huawei and such automotive companies as battery maker BYD and vehicle manufacturers Geely and Chery.”. (5) In the bipartisan “Investigative Report on the United States National Security Issues Posed by Chinese Telecommunication Companies Huawei and ZTE” released in 2012 by the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives, it was recommended that “U.S. government systems, particularly sensitive systems, should not include Huawei or ZTE equipment, including in component parts. Similarly, government contractors—particularly those working on contracts for sensitive U.S. programs—should exclude ZTE or Huawei equipment in their systems.”. (6) General Michael Hayden, who served as Director of the Central Intelligence Agency and Director of the National Security Agency, stated in July 2013 that Huawei had “shared with the Chinese state intimate and extensive knowledge of foreign telecommunications systems it is involved with”. (7) The Federal Bureau of Investigation, in a February 2015 Counterintelligence Strategy Partnership Intelligence Note stated that, “[w]ith the expanded use of Huawei Technologies Inc. equipment and services in U.S. telecommunications service provider networks, the Chinese Government’s potential access to U.S. business communications is dramatically increasing. Chinese Government-supported telecommunications equipment on U.S. networks may be exploited through Chinese cyber activity, with China’s intelligence services operating as an advanced persistent threat to U.S. networks.”. (8) The Federal Bureau of Investigation further stated in its February 2015 counterintelligence note that “China makes no secret that its cyber warfare strategy is predicated on controlling global communications network infrastructure”. (9) At a hearing before the Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives on September 30, 2015, Deputy Secretary of Defense Robert Work, responding to a question about the use of Huawei telecommunications equipment, stated, “In the Office of the Secretary of Defense, absolutely not. And I know of no other—I don't believe we operate in the Pentagon, any [Huawei] systems in the Pentagon.”. (10) At that hearing, the Commander of the United States Cyber Command, Admiral Mike Rogers, responding to a question about why such Huawei telecommunications equipment is not used, stated, “As we look at supply chain and we look at potential vulnerabilities within the system, that it is a risk we felt was unacceptable.”. (11) In March 2017, ZTE Corporation pled guilty to conspiring to violate the International Emergency Economic Powers Act by illegally shipping United States-origin items to Iran, paying the United States Government a penalty of $892,360,064 for activity between January 2010 and January 2016. (12) The Office of Foreign Assets Control of the Department of the Treasury issued a subpoena to Huawei as part of a Federal investigation of alleged violations of trade restrictions on Cuba, Iran, and Sudan. (b) Prohibition On Agency Use Or Procurement.—The head of an agency may not procure or obtain, may not extend or renew a contract to procure or obtain, and may not enter into a contract (or extend or renew a contract) with an entity that uses, or contracts with any other entity that uses, any equipment, system, or service that uses covered telecommunications equipment or services as a substantial or essential component of any system, or as critical technology as part of any system. (c) Report.—Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the Secretary of Commerce, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense and the United States Trade Representative, shall submit to Congress a report on sales by the Government of the People’s Republic of China of covered telecommunications equipment or services through partial ownership or any other methods. (d) Definitions.—In this section: (1) AGENCY.—The term “agency” has the meaning given that term in section 551 of title 5, United States Code. (2) COVERED TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT OR SERVICES.—The term “covered telecommunications equipment or services” means any of the following: (A) Telecommunications equipment produced by Huawei Technologies Company, ZTE Corporation, or any other Chinese telecom entity identified by the Director of National Intelligence, the Secretary of Defense, or the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation as a security concern (or any subsidiary or affiliate of any such entity). (B) Telecommunications services provided by such entities or using such equipment. (C) Telecommunications equipment or services produced or provided by an entity that the head of the relevant agency reasonably believes to be an entity owned or controlled by, or otherwise connected to, the Government of the People’s Republic of China. TITLE II—FAIR TRADE ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS WITH RESPECT TO THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA SEC. 201. COUNTERVAILING DUTIES WITH RESPECT TO CERTAIN INDUSTRIES IN THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA. (a) Policy.—It is the policy of the United States— (1) to reduce the import of finished goods from the People’s Republic of China relating to the Made in China 2025 plan set forth by the Government of the People’s Republic of China; and (2) to encourage allies of the United States to reduce the import of finished goods from the People’s Republic of China relating to the Made in China 2025 plan. (b) Inclusion Of Made In China 2025 Products In Definition Of Countervailable Subsidy.—Paragraph (5) of section 771 of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1677) is amended by adding at the end the following: “(G) TREATMENT OF CERTAIN CHINESE MERCHANDISE.—Notwithstanding any other provision of this title, if a person presents evidence in a petition filed under section 702(b) that merchandise covered by the petition is manufactured or produced in, or exported from, the People’s Republic of China and included in the most recent list required under section 183 of the Trade Act of 1974, determined in consultation with the United States Trade Representative, the administrating authority shall determine that a countervailable subsidy is being provided with respect to that merchandise.”. (c) Inclusion Of Made In China 2025 Products In Definition Of Material Injury.—Paragraph (7)(F) of such section is amended by adding at the end the following: “(iv) TREATMENT OF CERTAIN CHINESE MERCHANDISE.—Notwithstanding any other provision of this title, if a petition filed under section 702(b) alleges that an industry in the United States is materially injured or threatened with material injury or that the establishment of an industry in the United States is materially retarded by reason of imports of merchandise manufactured or produced in, or exported from, the People’s Republic of China and included in the most recent list required under section 183 of the Trade Act of 1974, determined in consultation with the United States Trade Representative, the Commission shall determine that material injury or such a threat exists.”. SEC. 202. REPEAL OF REDUCED WITHHOLDING RATES FOR RESIDENTS OF CHINA. (a) In General.—Section 894 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended— (1) by striking “The provisions of” in subsection (a) and inserting “Except as otherwise provided in this section, the provisions of”, and (2) by adding at the end the following new subsection: “(d) Exception For People’s Republic Of China.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—The rates of tax imposed under sections 871 and 881, and the rates of withholding tax imposed under chapter 3, with respect to any resident of the People’s Republic of China shall be determined without regard to any provision of the Agreement between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the People’s Republic of China for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and the Prevention of Tax Evasion with Respect to Taxes on Income, signed at Beijing on April 30, 1984. “(2) REGULATIONS.—The Secretary shall promulgate regulations to prevent the avoidance of the purposes of this subsection through the use of foreign entities.”. (b) Effective Date.—The amendments made by this section shall apply to income received after the date of the enactment of this Act. SEC. 203. TAXATION OF OBLIGATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES HELD BY THE GOVERNMENT OF THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA. (a) In General.—Section 892 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by redesignating subsection (c) as subsection (d) and by inserting after subsection (b) the following new subsection: “(c) Exception.—This section shall not apply to the Government of the People’s Republic of China.”. (b) Central Bank.—Section 895 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended— (1) by striking “Income” and inserting the following: “(a) In General.—Income”, and (2) by adding at the end the following new subsection: “(b) Exception.—This section shall not apply to the any central bank of the People's Republic of China.”. (c) Effective Date.—The amendments made by this section shall apply to income received or derived after the date of the enactment of this Act. SEC. 204. SURTAX ON CERTAIN INCOME DERIVED FROM CHINA. (a) In General.—Subpart D of part II of subchapter N of chapter 1 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by adding at the end the following new section: “SEC. 899. IMPOSITION OF SURTAX ON CERTAIN INCOME FROM CHINA. “(a) In General.—In addition to other taxes, there is imposed on the China source income of any applicable United States person a tax equal to 2 percent of such income. “(b) Applicable United States Person.—For purposes of this subsection, the term ‘applicable United States person’ means any United States person who— “(1) holds an investment through a partnership with a resident of the People’s Republic of China, or “(2) participates in a joint shareholding venture with a resident of the People’s Republic of China. “(c) China Source Income.—For purposes of this section, the term ‘China source income’ means any amount received from sources within the People’s Republic of China which is attributable to an investment described in subsection (b)(1) or a venture described in subsection (b)(2). Such amount shall be reduced so as to take into account deductions (including taxes) properly allocable to such income under rules similar to the rules of section 954(b)(5).”. (b) Tax Not Treated As Part Of Regular Tax Liability.—Section 26(b)(2) of such Code is amended by striking “and” at the end of subparagraph (X), by striking the period at the end of subparagraph (Y) and inserting “, and”, and by adding at the end the following new subparagraph: “(Z) section 899 (relating to surtax on certain income from China).”. (c) Clerical Amendment.—The table of sections for subpart D of part II of subchapter N of chapter 1 of such Code is amended by adding at the end the following new item: “Sec. 899. Imposition of surtax on certain income from China.”. (d) Effective Date.—The amendments made by this section shall apply to income received after the date of the enactment of this Act. TITLE III—STOPPING FOREIGN BUSINESSES SANCTUARY SEC. 301. JURISDICTION OVER CERTAIN FOREIGN ENTITIES. Section 1605 of title 28, United States Code, is amended by inserting after subsection (d) the following: “(e) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, an entity is not immune from the jurisdiction of the courts of the United States or of the States if the entity— “(1) is incorporated in a foreign state in which state-owned or state-controlled entities commonly engage in commercial activity; and “(2) conducts commercial activity in the United States.”. SEC. 302. COMMERCIAL ACTIVITY OF AFFILIATE ENTITIES. Section 1603(d) of title 28, United States Code, is amended— (1) by inserting “(1)” before “A”; and (2) by adding at the end the following: “(2) For purposes of this chapter, a commercial activity of an agency or instrumentality of a foreign state, or of an entity described in section 1605(e), shall be attributable to any corporate affiliate of the agency, instrumentality, or entity that— “(A) directly or indirectly owns a majority of shares of the agency, instrumentality, or entity; and “(B) is also an agency or instrumentality of a foreign state, or an entity described in section 1605(e).”.
  14. James Grant

    Attorney General Nomination

    Motion to extend debate recognized, 24 hours to vote
  15. James Grant

    Miner Protection Act

    The bill passes by unanimous consent
  16. The bill passes by unanimous consent
  17. James Grant

    FARMS Act

    The bill passes by unanimous consent
  18. James Grant

    RNC Chair Grant on ALERT Act

    James Grant From the Office of RNC Chairman James Grant There has been terror incidents that still stand in recent memory that unsettle the public. The assassination of President Macmillan. The Mall of America mass shooting. My recently introduced bill the Amplifying Local Efforts to Root out Terror Act (or ALERT Act) which allows federal law enforcement to train and work more closely with state and local law enforcement in using the most effective tactics and methods to counter terrorism. It will also establish in the Department of Homeland Security a board to coordinate and integrate departmental intelligence, activities, and policy related to counter-terrorism. It will also push to use the testimonials of former violent extremists or their associates in order to counter terrorist recruitment. This bill will do more to protect the public than any condemnation of a terror group will. We must secure our nation from terrorism and prevent radicalization here at home so the American people can be safe and live without fear, this bill will do much to make that a reality for Americans. View full PR
  19. James Grant

    Labradoodle PC

    Mr. Labradoodle, What issues do you believe are affecting the citizens of Idaho the most and how should we go about addressing those issues?
  20. James Grant

    FARMS Act

    Motion recognized, 24 hours to object
  21. Motion recognized, 24 hours to object
  22. James Grant

    Miner Protection Act

    Motion recognized, 24 hours to object
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