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Wm96

CH Democrats
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Wm96 last won the day on October 17

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About Wm96

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  • Birthday 04/04/1996

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  1. Karl Cox Congressman Karl Cox (D-TN) spoke earlier today at a Prayer Breakfast at Meharry Medical College in Nashville Good morning, fellow Nashvillians, Tennesseans, and Americans. Today, I come to speak to you about faith and conviction, two of the most important qualities in both leadership and life. First, I’d like to talk about faith. I am and have always been a devout Methodist. This faith has fueled my passion to help my fellow man and has saved me in times of real trouble. It is through this faith that I can get up in the morning and face the trials that come with my job. Without it, I don’t know what I’d do. You want to know the secret to living a good life and making it through trouble? Keep God close. It’s the only way. Now, from this faith comes conviction, something that has been severely lacking in Washington as of late. I recently got in a pretty public spat with a Congressman from Texas. Now, some political consultants might say, “Karl, let it go. If you ever want to run for higher office, you don’t want to alienate anyone who agrees with Congressman Swanner.” But I’m here at Meharry, perhaps the premier predominantly black medical college in the country that makes our city proud each and every day, and I pray with and connect with God just the same as so many of you in the crowd, and I know that I can’t be some milk toast, go with the political winds politician. Through our faith comes conviction, and I know I have to stand up against racism every time, not because it’s politically expedient, but because it’s the right thing to do. That’s what I pray for in this country. We need young men and women of faith and conviction to stand up and move with strength, dignity and honor. That’s what will really bring change—that’s what will really bring justice. And I look around at the faces in this audience and I’m inspired, because I know it will happen. You all are our future, and I pray that God will put the fire of justice, kindness, charity, and love in your hearts, and that you will go out and do good for our nation. That’s what this country was built on, and that’s how we can continue to fight back against bigory and racism every single time. Not because it’s expedient, but because we have faith and conviction, and we know it’s the right thing to do. Thank you. View full PR
  2. Congressman Karl Cox (D-TN) spoke earlier today at a Prayer Breakfast at Meharry Medical College in Nashville Good morning, fellow Nashvillians, Tennesseans, and Americans. Today, I come to speak to you about faith and conviction, two of the most important qualities in both leadership and life. First, I’d like to talk about faith. I am and have always been a devout Methodist. This faith has fueled my passion to help my fellow man and has saved me in times of real trouble. It is through this faith that I can get up in the morning and face the trials that come with my job. Without it, I don’t know what I’d do. You want to know the secret to living a good life and making it through trouble? Keep God close. It’s the only way. Now, from this faith comes conviction, something that has been severely lacking in Washington as of late. I recently got in a pretty public spat with a Congressman from Texas. Now, some political consultants might say, “Karl, let it go. If you ever want to run for higher office, you don’t want to alienate anyone who agrees with Congressman Swanner.” But I’m here at Meharry, perhaps the premier predominantly black medical college in the country that makes our city proud each and every day, and I pray with and connect with God just the same as so many of you in the crowd, and I know that I can’t be some milk toast, go with the political winds politician. Through our faith comes conviction, and I know I have to stand up against racism every time, not because it’s politically expedient, but because it’s the right thing to do. That’s what I pray for in this country. We need young men and women of faith and conviction to stand up and move with strength, dignity and honor. That’s what will really bring change—that’s what will really bring justice. And I look around at the faces in this audience and I’m inspired, because I know it will happen. You all are our future, and I pray that God will put the fire of justice, kindness, charity, and love in your hearts, and that you will go out and do good for our nation. That’s what this country was built on, and that’s how we can continue to fight back against bigory and racism every single time. Not because it’s expedient, but because we have faith and conviction, and we know it’s the right thing to do. Thank you.
  3. Mark Rambor (Senate Multi) Senate Minority Leader Mark Rambor (D-TX) spoke to reporters outside of his office earlier today after voting yes for every bill on the docket in the Senate: Hello, Since I joined the senate over a year ago, I have done my best to call out partisan nonsense and to praise good governance any time I see them in the Senate, regardless of party. Today, I’m proud to say that I saw the latter, and as such, I’d like to praise my fellow Senators for looking past party and doing what’s best for the country. I’d like to look into a few of these bills specifically and show why they will be good for the people of Texas and Americans just the same. First, the Children of Fallen Heroes Scholarship Act—a bill I am proud to do-sponsor. This bill, which was sponsored by Democrats, increases federal Pell Grants for children of fallen public safety officers. I can think of no better way to honor these heroes that sacrificed their lives for us than this. I’m proud that this bill hit the floor and was passed without objection. This is what we were elected to do. Second, the Vocational Training Act, which provides better funding for technical and career training in public schools. This bill, sponsored by Republicans, is long overdue, and will particularly help the millions of rural schools and communities throughout Texas and this country. I’m proud that this bill passed without objection as well. Lastly, the Alice Cogswell and Anne Sullivan Macy Act. This bill, also sponsored by Republicans, reforms our education system to better accommodate disabled students. These students exist in very large numbers, and yet, we have not taken the steps to serve these students in our education system and best prepare them for the workforce. This bill is a good first step toward remedying this problem, and I’m proud to have voted for it. Going forward, I hope to see more of this type of governance, so that We can continue to do good for our constituents and the country. View full PR
  4. Senate Minority Leader Mark Rambor (D-TX) spoke to reporters outside of his office earlier today after voting yes for every bill on the docket in the Senate: Hello, Since I joined the senate over a year ago, I have done my best to call out partisan nonsense and to praise good governance any time I see them in the Senate, regardless of party. Today, I’m proud to say that I saw the latter, and as such, I’d like to praise my fellow Senators for looking past party and doing what’s best for the country. I’d like to look into a few of these bills specifically and show why they will be good for the people of Texas and Americans just the same. First, the Children of Fallen Heroes Scholarship Act—a bill I am proud to do-sponsor. This bill, which was sponsored by Democrats, increases federal Pell Grants for children of fallen public safety officers. I can think of no better way to honor these heroes that sacrificed their lives for us than this. I’m proud that this bill hit the floor and was passed without objection. This is what we were elected to do. Second, the Vocational Training Act, which provides better funding for technical and career training in public schools. This bill, sponsored by Republicans, is long overdue, and will particularly help the millions of rural schools and communities throughout Texas and this country. I’m proud that this bill passed without objection as well. Lastly, the Alice Cogswell and Anne Sullivan Macy Act. This bill, also sponsored by Republicans, reforms our education system to better accommodate disabled students. These students exist in very large numbers, and yet, we have not taken the steps to serve these students in our education system and best prepare them for the workforce. This bill is a good first step toward remedying this problem, and I’m proud to have voted for it. Going forward, I hope to see more of this type of governance, so that We can continue to do good for our constituents and the country.
  5. Wm96

    Campaign Promises

    Mark Rambor: I promise, that if you support Democratic candidates for Senate and I become Majority Leader, I will— Common Cause Pass term limits. I supported them this session, even when the Republicans were in power. Pass campaign finance reform and keep my party from following in the footsteps of the corruption of the past. Fight to protect our elections from outside influence. Fight anti-democratic gerrymandering. Rural Institute Pass my rural education bill and other bills like it to bolster rural education, making rural communities more competitive with urban centers. Fight to rebuild our crumbling rural infrastructure. Fight for better funding for rural hospitals and urgent healthcare providers. Support the fight for better vocational training.
  6. Hello Congressman Costello, Many onlookers have watched this presidential primary and said that they believe that Senator Bennett is the more conservative of the two major Democratic candidates, and yet you endorsed him. Do you agree that Bennett is the more conservative candidate between him and Knox, and if so, why did you endorse him?
  7. Wm96

    Bennett meets with Teachers in Mobile

    Mr. Bennett, While Speaker Knox has talked a lot about reforming education, you have said very little. What’s your plan to build a better education system?
  8. Wm96

    Pathway to Parenting Act of 2020

    Mr. Speaker, Could the gentleman please explain the nature of his objection? I yield
  9. Wm96

    Knox Family Hosts BBQ in Dallas

    Mr. Speaker, Being from Arkansas yourself, what do you think of the Arkansas Republican primary? Seems like the Republicans are pretty mad at Mr. Pinnacle.
  10. Wm96

    NAACP Anti-Racists Rally

    Hello! Wow, look at this crowd tonight! It's times like this that I am reminded that there are so many more of us than there are of them. So many. If we all get out and vote in November, we'll send all of the Swanners and Taylors reeling. I say let's do it. Who's with me? *cheers* Anyway, let's get to the topic of the night. Racism. I'd like to say that I, a Tennessee Congressman, am following John, an Arkansas Congressman. Just as John mentioned about Arkansas, Tennessee has a fraught history with race. Dr. King was tragically killed in my state, Nashville, the city I represent, was one of the cities in which African-Americans had to hold massive protests and sit-ins in order to be allowed to eat in the same restaurants as white people, and even now, Tennessee remains the 9th most segregated state in terms of schools. But, as Bob Dylan famously sang: the times, they are a-changin'. We will continue to work tirelessly to fight this absolute scourge of racism that has plagued this country for hundreds of years. We have made strides, but if this whole Taylor debacle has shown us anything, it's how much further we have to go. The fact that Jack Swanner refused to condemn an obvious racist, even when confronted multiple times, is disgusting. The fact that President Fitzgerald acted like he didn't know anything about Taylor even after he'd been declared and in the news for a month is also Disgusting. Hey Mr. Fitzgerald, you're the President. It's your duty to represent and defend everyone in this country, even if they aren't white. It's your duty to know about a dangerous racist running for Senate in your party. But people of color see right through your antics. We have a long history of turning a blind eye to racism in this country, and people of color know it when they see it. But they can't turn a blind eye anymore. They can't ignore you any longer. I can tell by the feeling in this croud that you won't let them. Make noise. Be angry. Let them know that you're here too, and you won't abide politicians who think you aren't worth as much as they are. Like I said earlier, let's go to the polls this November and show these men what happens when you refuse to stand against racism. Let's make them know how many of us abhor Taylor's outdated, terrible views. We can usher in a new time. We can work to close income and education inequality that has been set up to keep people of color down. We can work to shut down the private prison industry and work on criminal justice reform. We can legalize marijuana. We can pass common-sense gun regulation. We can fight for better minority representation in the courts, in congress, and all throughout society. All of these issues have been set up to hurt minorities the most, but it doesn't have to be this way. We can build a better society, but not until we elect politicians with courage and conviction. This crop of Republicans are not those people. Dr. King said that the arc of moral history is long and bends toward justice. Swanner and Fitzgerald are standing against that bend, but they can't stop it. We won't let them. You won't let them. Now let's go out and make change! Thank you!
  11. Karl Cox The Office of Karl Cox (D-TN) released the following statement following his introduction of the Ending Tax Breaks for Private Prisons Act: Today, I introduced an act that will end tax breaks for private prisons, something that is long overdue. I personally find it reprehensible that we have corporations in this country that profit off of incarcerating people, but if they are going to exist, they shouldn't get tax exemptions. Senator Rambor, in his questioning of Attorney General Sheridan, showed that Mr. Sheridan will not end the federal use of private prisons, even though they have been shown to produce lower quality prisons without costing less, so these things will not be going away. Until we can get an Attorney General that will stop this wrongful industry in America, this is the best we can do. This bill will create more revenue by stopping the exploitation of tax loopholes, which is something we can all get behind. View full PR
  12. The Office of Karl Cox (D-TN) released the following statement following his introduction of the Ending Tax Breaks for Private Prisons Act: Today, I introduced an act that will end tax breaks for private prisons, something that is long overdue. I personally find it reprehensible that we have corporations in this country that profit off of incarcerating people, but if they are going to exist, they shouldn't get tax exemptions. Senator Rambor, in his questioning of Attorney General Sheridan, showed that Mr. Sheridan will not end the federal use of private prisons, even though they have been shown to produce lower quality prisons without costing less, so these things will not be going away. Until we can get an Attorney General that will stop this wrongful industry in America, this is the best we can do. This bill will create more revenue by stopping the exploitation of tax loopholes, which is something we can all get behind.
  13. IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES March 21, 2020 Mr. Cox (for himself and Mr. Meeks) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Ways and Means A BILL To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to exclude corporations operating prisons from the definition of taxable REIT subsidiary. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Ending Tax Breaks for Private Prisons Act”. SEC. 2. EXCLUSION OF CORPORATIONS OPERATING PRISON FACILITIES FROM DEFINITION OF TAXABLE REIT FACILITY. (a) In General.—Section 856(l)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended— (1) by striking subparagraph (A) and inserting the following: “(A) any corporation which— “(i) directly or indirectly operates or manages a lodging facility or a health care facility, or “(ii) directly or indirectly operates or manages a prison facility or provides services at or in connection with a prison facility, and”; (2) in subparagraph (B), by striking “any lodging facility or health care facility” and inserting “any lodging facility, health care facility, or prison facility”; and (3) by striking the last sentence and inserting the following: “Subparagraph (B) shall not apply to rights provided to an eligible independent contractor to operate or manage a lodging facility, a health care facility, or a prison facility if such rights are held by such corporation as a franchisee, licensee, or in a similar capacity and such lodging facility, health care facility, or prison facility is either owned by such corporation or is leased to such corporation from the real estate investment trust.”. (b) Definition Of Prison Facility.—Section 856(l)(4) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by adding at the end the following new subparagraph: “(C) PRISON FACILITY.—The term ‘prison facility’ means any correctional, detention, or penal facility.”. (c) Effective Date.—The amendments made by this section shall apply to taxable years beginning after the date of the enactment of this Act.
  14. Wm96

    American Public Radio

    Hello, you're listening to Nothing Unconsidered on APR. I'm Michael Moonwilkins. Today we have our interview with Congressman Henry Pinnacle of Arkansas. An old-school, moderate Republican, Congressman Pinnacle has made waves by recently endorsing Speaker John Knox, a Democrat also from Arkansas, for President. We have a ton of news to cover in our next segment of Nothing Unconsidered, so tune in tomorrow to stay up to date! Here to join us is Congressman Pinnacle himself! Thank you for joining us, Congressman. Pinnacle: Michael, thanks for having me on. It’s so great to be here So, you endorsed Speaker Knox for President. Why did you do that? Pinnacle: Under the Fitzgerald Administration, our country has lacked the leadership it deserves on both domestic and international levels. Arkansans and I are seeing Congress become more and more divided, while Fitzgerald bullies his way into getting what he wants at the expense of America’s exceptionalism. Although Speaker Knox and I don’t share the same stances on all the issues, I know we share the same values; like the value of compromise for the greater good of all People, not just those who already agree with you; and the value of power as a means to achieve, not to destroy. I endorsed Speaker Knox because those values are what makes a good leader, not the color of one’s jersey. In response, you have been called a RINO by some Republican media. What is you response to that? Pinnacle: Haha Well, actually I was called a RINO before I endorsed the Speaker. But honestly, Michael, Arkansans don’t care about the names their elected officials are called by people who’ve never been to our State, and who probably pronounce both ‘S’s in “Arkansas.” They care about what their elected leaders do for them. In the short time that I’ve been in the House, I think Arkansans have seen me work tirelessly to advocate for them, and that’s what really matters. Can you tell us some about the ANWR Act and why you think it's a good deal? Pinnacle: Good question. The Arctic National Wildlife Reserve has about 10.6 billion barrels of oil sitting right beneath it. What the ANWR Act would do is open a small portion of that area up to safe oil development, thus boosting the U.S. economy, eliminating our dependence on foreign oil, and creating jobs for tens, maybe hundreds, of thousands of American citizens. You saw Representative Swanner come out against the amended ANWR bill this week. Why do you think that is? Pinnacle: The Congressman’s press release seemed to be expressedly angry with two common-sense provisions of the Bill: one, the requirement that oil development would have to pause if the caribou population—a major food source for the natives in Northern Alaska, who essentially live off of the land we’d be developing on—significantly declined (by 30%) due to drilling, and, two, the allocation of about 6% of the revenue towards the White House’s National Science and Technology Council to research any impact on the climate. It makes no logical sense as to why anyone would be opposed to protecting the people who’d be impacted by this legislation the most. What it really boils down to is Mr. Swanner’s hatred of compromise. Some people would rather pour out a gallon of milk than give a glass to someone else. Some people would rather have $0 than have $300 billion, with a small percentage going towards compromise. I think that’s a shame. Do you think your Republican colleagues in the Senate and President Fitzgerald will pass it? Pinnacle: Although the amended version of the ANWR Act passed the House by a wide margin, with both Democrats and Republicans in favor of it, the Senate decided to pursue passing the old version. Don’t ask me why the Senate took this course, seeing Rep. Faulhammer—the Bill’s original sponsor—voted FOR the amended Bill. It makes just as little sense to me as it does most of us in the House. I’m not sure what actions the President plans to take should the House’s ANWR Act reach his desk, but I hope he does what’s right and signs it. You voted against the gun show loophole act. Why is that? Pinnacle: I voted against the gun show loophole act because I don’t think it’ll do any good to the American people, especially my constituents in Arkansas, to impose arbitrary restrictions and limitations on their 2nd Amendment rights. I think it’s also important to understand that all federal firearms licensees (people selling firearms) already have to confirm the buyer’s legal right to own a gun, regardless of whether he or she is selling out of a store, a gun show, or out the back of their car. What are you working on now? What is your next push in Congress? Pinnacle: Right now, I’m still working day-in and day-out to be an effective Advocate-in-Congress for the people of Arkansas. I recently proposed the Easy A Act, which would make it simpler for students to apply for federal financial aid; and I soon plan to work with my colleagues in Congress to roll out a series of government reforms that’ll reduce wasteful spending and remove the the federal government’s role in private affairs. Thank you, Congressman Pinnacle. Pinnacle: Thanks, Michael. So there you have it. Thanks for listening--tune in tomorrow for our news segment of Nothing Unconsidered. For APR, I'm Michael Moonwilkins.
  15. Wm96

    ANWR Act

    I second
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