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Wm96

CH Democrats
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Everything posted by Wm96

  1. Hello Congressman Costello, Many onlookers have watched this presidential primary and said that they believe that Senator Bennett is the more conservative of the two major Democratic candidates, and yet you endorsed him. Do you agree that Bennett is the more conservative candidate between him and Knox, and if so, why did you endorse him?
  2. Wm96

    Bennett meets with Teachers in Mobile

    Mr. Bennett, While Speaker Knox has talked a lot about reforming education, you have said very little. What’s your plan to build a better education system?
  3. Wm96

    Pathway to Parenting Act of 2020

    Mr. Speaker, Could the gentleman please explain the nature of his objection? I yield
  4. Wm96

    Knox Family Hosts BBQ in Dallas

    Mr. Speaker, Being from Arkansas yourself, what do you think of the Arkansas Republican primary? Seems like the Republicans are pretty mad at Mr. Pinnacle.
  5. Wm96

    American Public Radio

    American Public Radio, "Nothing Unconsidered" A radio show that covers current events in Washington. Usually has three sections: 1. News 2. Commentary 3. Interview Rarely, in times of major events, there will be special programs that take a different form, but usually this is the form it takes.
  6. Karl Cox The Office of Karl Cox (D-TN) released the following statement following his introduction of the Ending Tax Breaks for Private Prisons Act: Today, I introduced an act that will end tax breaks for private prisons, something that is long overdue. I personally find it reprehensible that we have corporations in this country that profit off of incarcerating people, but if they are going to exist, they shouldn't get tax exemptions. Senator Rambor, in his questioning of Attorney General Sheridan, showed that Mr. Sheridan will not end the federal use of private prisons, even though they have been shown to produce lower quality prisons without costing less, so these things will not be going away. Until we can get an Attorney General that will stop this wrongful industry in America, this is the best we can do. This bill will create more revenue by stopping the exploitation of tax loopholes, which is something we can all get behind. View full PR
  7. Mark Rambor (Senate Multi) Senate Minority Leader Mark Rambor (D-TX) spoke to reporters on the steps of the Capitol today about the revoking of student visas to Chinese Students So my thoughts are pretty simple on this. This is a bad move all the way around. First, this is not a good way to hurt the Chinese—as the Chinese Minister of Education said, this will hurt the American economy. Second, this is a further escalation of a conflict that should be being deescalated. Third, Chinese students are not responsible for this conflict at all, so to punish them for this and allege, without evidence, that they are stealing intellectual property is absolutely wrong. This is just another example of recklessness and imprudence by this administration. I hope that President Fitzgerald will reconsider and take a more thoughtful approach. View full PR
  8. Karl Cox Congressman Karl Cox (D-TN) stumped for Speaker John Knox (D-AR) at a rally In Minneapolis, Minnesota earlier today Hello, it’s great to be here in the great state of Minnesota. Honestly, you people are the strongest in the country. Where I come from in Tennessee, if it ever got this cold and snowed this much, we might all just give up, and it’s March! I dream of your kind of strength. *chuckles* I’m here to talk about a dear friend of mine. A man of strength and a man of character. Speaker of the House John Knox. When I first met John, I knew we were going to work closely. Even though there are more than their used to be, there still aren’t that many southern Democrats in office. And I know it won’t be exactly the talking point it is down there, but John is a true southerner. He’s not one of those out of touch ivory tower types that just puts on a southern drawl for cheap political points—he really is a down to earth southern man. So needless to say we hit it off and got to work right when he showed up. Soon after he got elected, we started to work on legislation. The first docket is always a defining moment for a Speaker. The #1 thing you tackle often defines you, and I think it defined John. ”States’ rights” John told me. “This administration has gotten away with trampling on state sovereignty for too long.” I agree. So, our first docket was nothing but states’ rights bills. AUMF Repeal and Marijuana legalization were the big ones. We got bipartisan support early, and we thought there was a chance that we could get them signed. The country was on our side, and over 100 House Republicans voted for each bill. Then every single Senate Republican voted against them both, and they died in the Senate. When he saw the writing on the wall for those bills, I saw something change in John. He saw the partisanship and injustice that is Washington. But instead of being defeated, he knew he needed to do something. He called me into his office, and he asked me to pray with him. Now I’m Methodist and he’s Presbyterian, so that was pretty shocking. *laughs* But when we looked up, he said to me “Karl, I’m running for President. It’s what I need to do.” I think I can speak for John when I say that if you give him the office, if you, the people, elect John Knox as the next President of the United States, he will work tirelessly for you. He will stop this federal overreach, return power to the states, and do whatever else he believes is necessary to dignify the office and help you, the people. No longer will we have endless wars unapproved by Congress, fought by our children. No longer will the federal government tell your state that smoking a substance less dangerous than tobacco get you thrown in jail. John believes in the separation of powers, and I know he’ll do you right. But further than that, he’s just the right man for the job. So, let’s all get out, do him right and vote for him. You won’t be sorry you did. View full PR
  9. Mark Rambor (Senate Multi) The Office of Senate Minority Leader Mark Rambor (D-TX) released the following statement following his vote against the confirmation of Gary Sheridan for the position of Attorney General: To me, there is no position in government more important than that of Attorney General, for there is not duty more vital to the survival of our republic than justice. Justice is paramount to the wellbeing of the citizens of this nation. It is vital to the trust that binds us together, and that is why the position of Attorney General, the chief administrator of justice, holds such high stakes for me. We need an Attorney General that is interested in fairness and the good of the people above all, and I wanted Mr. Sheridan to be that person so I could vote for him and feel good afterward. Unfortunately, after a long series of questions, I do not believe that to be the case. One question sank it all. I asked Mr. Sheridan about the Department of Justice’s use of private prisons and whether he supports and would continue it. Contracting out prisons to private companies logically seems like a bad idea, because incentivizing lower costs and keeping more people in prison for longer seems wrong, but practically it’s much worse. It has been demonstrably shown that private prisons treat both officers and inmates worse, give more infractions to keep them in prison longer, and cost the government the same or more than public prisons. These prisons do worse by society, all to benefit large corporations that make billions every year on the backs of the taxpayer and prisoners. Mr. Sheridan disputes this, though. He either refuses to believe or is unaware of the data surrounding these prisons. I’m not going to indict his character or motives without evidence, but no matter how you look at it, I believe it is disqualifying for the position of Attorney General. I hope my fellow Senators will feel the same and that the President will nominate someone else. OOC: https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/es_20161021_private_prisons_economics.pdf View full PR
  10. Mark Rambor (Senate Multi) The Office of Senate Minority Leader Mark Rambor (D-TX) released the following statement following his introduction of the DEA Enforcement and Authority Act of 2020: Today, I introduced a bill that will make a difference. In 2016, this congress passed a bill that made it much harder for the DEA to stop large shipment of opioids to physician practices, and made it much more difficult for them to do one of their most important jobs: stop drug pushing doctors. As a result, there have been many, many people claimed by the opioid epidemic. This problem is widespread, and it's claimed the lives of far too many Texans. This bill would amend that law, keeping the good parts and taking out the language that has restricted the DEA for too long. I hope this bill finds itself bipartisan, and that we can promptly pass it. It would make a difference in so many Americans' lives who have come into direct contact with this problem. View full PR
  11. Wm96

    NAACP Anti-Racists Rally

    Hello! Wow, look at this crowd tonight! It's times like this that I am reminded that there are so many more of us than there are of them. So many. If we all get out and vote in November, we'll send all of the Swanners and Taylors reeling. I say let's do it. Who's with me? *cheers* Anyway, let's get to the topic of the night. Racism. I'd like to say that I, a Tennessee Congressman, am following John, an Arkansas Congressman. Just as John mentioned about Arkansas, Tennessee has a fraught history with race. Dr. King was tragically killed in my state, Nashville, the city I represent, was one of the cities in which African-Americans had to hold massive protests and sit-ins in order to be allowed to eat in the same restaurants as white people, and even now, Tennessee remains the 9th most segregated state in terms of schools. But, as Bob Dylan famously sang: the times, they are a-changin'. We will continue to work tirelessly to fight this absolute scourge of racism that has plagued this country for hundreds of years. We have made strides, but if this whole Taylor debacle has shown us anything, it's how much further we have to go. The fact that Jack Swanner refused to condemn an obvious racist, even when confronted multiple times, is disgusting. The fact that President Fitzgerald acted like he didn't know anything about Taylor even after he'd been declared and in the news for a month is also Disgusting. Hey Mr. Fitzgerald, you're the President. It's your duty to represent and defend everyone in this country, even if they aren't white. It's your duty to know about a dangerous racist running for Senate in your party. But people of color see right through your antics. We have a long history of turning a blind eye to racism in this country, and people of color know it when they see it. But they can't turn a blind eye anymore. They can't ignore you any longer. I can tell by the feeling in this croud that you won't let them. Make noise. Be angry. Let them know that you're here too, and you won't abide politicians who think you aren't worth as much as they are. Like I said earlier, let's go to the polls this November and show these men what happens when you refuse to stand against racism. Let's make them know how many of us abhor Taylor's outdated, terrible views. We can usher in a new time. We can work to close income and education inequality that has been set up to keep people of color down. We can work to shut down the private prison industry and work on criminal justice reform. We can legalize marijuana. We can pass common-sense gun regulation. We can fight for better minority representation in the courts, in congress, and all throughout society. All of these issues have been set up to hurt minorities the most, but it doesn't have to be this way. We can build a better society, but not until we elect politicians with courage and conviction. This crop of Republicans are not those people. Dr. King said that the arc of moral history is long and bends toward justice. Swanner and Fitzgerald are standing against that bend, but they can't stop it. We won't let them. You won't let them. Now let's go out and make change! Thank you!
  12. The Office of Karl Cox (D-TN) released the following statement following his introduction of the Ending Tax Breaks for Private Prisons Act: Today, I introduced an act that will end tax breaks for private prisons, something that is long overdue. I personally find it reprehensible that we have corporations in this country that profit off of incarcerating people, but if they are going to exist, they shouldn't get tax exemptions. Senator Rambor, in his questioning of Attorney General Sheridan, showed that Mr. Sheridan will not end the federal use of private prisons, even though they have been shown to produce lower quality prisons without costing less, so these things will not be going away. Until we can get an Attorney General that will stop this wrongful industry in America, this is the best we can do. This bill will create more revenue by stopping the exploitation of tax loopholes, which is something we can all get behind.
  13. IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES March 21, 2020 Mr. Cox (for himself and Mr. Meeks) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Ways and Means A BILL To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to exclude corporations operating prisons from the definition of taxable REIT subsidiary. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Ending Tax Breaks for Private Prisons Act”. SEC. 2. EXCLUSION OF CORPORATIONS OPERATING PRISON FACILITIES FROM DEFINITION OF TAXABLE REIT FACILITY. (a) In General.—Section 856(l)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended— (1) by striking subparagraph (A) and inserting the following: “(A) any corporation which— “(i) directly or indirectly operates or manages a lodging facility or a health care facility, or “(ii) directly or indirectly operates or manages a prison facility or provides services at or in connection with a prison facility, and”; (2) in subparagraph (B), by striking “any lodging facility or health care facility” and inserting “any lodging facility, health care facility, or prison facility”; and (3) by striking the last sentence and inserting the following: “Subparagraph (B) shall not apply to rights provided to an eligible independent contractor to operate or manage a lodging facility, a health care facility, or a prison facility if such rights are held by such corporation as a franchisee, licensee, or in a similar capacity and such lodging facility, health care facility, or prison facility is either owned by such corporation or is leased to such corporation from the real estate investment trust.”. (b) Definition Of Prison Facility.—Section 856(l)(4) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by adding at the end the following new subparagraph: “(C) PRISON FACILITY.—The term ‘prison facility’ means any correctional, detention, or penal facility.”. (c) Effective Date.—The amendments made by this section shall apply to taxable years beginning after the date of the enactment of this Act.
  14. IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES December 13, 2019 Mr. Cox (for himself, Ms. Shea-Porter, Mrs. Dingell, Ms. Wasserman Schultz, Mr. McGovern, Mrs. Watson Coleman, Mr. Gallego, Ms. Hanabusa, Mr. McNerney, Mr. Welch, and Mr. Cartwright) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Energy and Commerce, and in addition to the Committee on Education and the Workforce, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ A BILL To authorize the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to establish a Climate Change Education Program, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Climate Change Education Act”. SEC. 2. FINDINGS. Congress makes the following findings: (1) The evidence for human-induced climate change is overwhelming and undeniable. (2) Atmospheric carbon can be significantly reduced through conservation, by shifting to renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, tidal, and geothermal, and by increasing the efficiency of buildings, including domiciles, and transportation. (3) Providing clear information about climate change, in a variety of forms, can remove the fear and the sense of helplessness, and encourage individuals and communities to take action. (4) Implementation of measures that promote energy efficiency, conservation, and renewable energy will greatly reduce human impact on the environment. (5) Informing people of new technologies and programs as they become available will ensure maximum understanding and maximum effect of those measures. (6) More than 3,000,000 students graduate from high schools and colleges each year, armed with attitudes, skills, and knowledge about the climate that inform their actions. (7) The effect on the climate, positive or negative, of each of those 3,000,000 students lasts beyond a lifetime. (8) Those students need to be prepared to implement changes in professional and personal practices, to support and help develop new technology and policy, and to address the coming social and economic challenges and opportunities arising from a changing climate. (9) It has been demonstrated that the people of the United States overwhelmingly support teaching students about the causes, consequences, and potential solutions to climate change in all 50 States and more than 3,000 counties across the United States. (10) Only 30 percent of middle school and 45 percent of high school science teachers understand the extent of the scientific consensus on climate change. SEC. 3. DEFINITIONS. In this Act: (1) CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION.—The term “climate change education” means informal and formal interdisciplinary learning at all age levels about— (A) climate change, climate adaptation and mitigation, and climate resilience; and (B) the effects of climate change, climate adaptation and mitigation, and climate resilience on the environmental, energy, social, and economic systems of the United States. (2) GREEN COLLAR JOB.—The term “green collar job” means a job— (A) in a business that produces goods or provides services that benefit the environment or conserve natural resources; or (B) in which the duties of the worker involve making the production processes of the employer more environmentally friendly or use fewer natural resources. (3) GREEN ECONOMY.—The term “green economy” means an economy that results in improved human well-being and social equity by significantly reducing environmental risks and ecological scarcities. (4) INSTITUTION OF HIGHER EDUCATION.—The term “institution of higher education” has the meaning given the term in section 102 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1002). (5) LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY; STATE EDUCATIONAL AGENCY.—The terms “local educational agency” and “State educational agency” have the meanings given those terms in section 8101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801). (6) NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION.—The term “nonprofit organization” means an organization described in section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 and exempt from taxation under 501(a) of that Code. SEC. 4. CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION PROGRAM. The Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shall establish a Climate Change Education Program to— (1) increase the climate literacy of the United States by broadening the understanding of climate change, including possible long-term and short-term consequences and potential solutions; (2) apply the latest scientific and technological discoveries, including through the use of the scientific assets of the Administration, to provide formal and informal learning opportunities to individuals of all ages, including individuals of diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds; and (3) emphasize actionable information to help people understand and promote implementation of new technologies, programs, and incentives related to climate change, climate adaptation and mitigation, and climate resilience. SEC. 5. GRANT PROGRAM. (a) In General.—As part of the Climate Change Education Program established under section 4, the Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shall establish a program to make grants— (1) to States to encourage and support plans and programs for kindergarten through grade 12 formal and informal climate change education— (A) to ensure that students graduate from high school with high climate literacy, including— (i) relevant teacher training and professional development; (ii) science, technology, engineering, arts and design, and mathematics education; and (iii) interdisciplinary studies; and (B) with a particular focus on programs that advance widespread State and local educational agency adoption of climate change education, including funding for State educational agencies in partnership with local educational agencies and local nonprofit organizations to— (i) integrate key principles of climate change education into existing kindergarten through grade 12 State academic content standards, student academic achievement standards, or State curriculum frameworks; (ii) create model State climate change curricula; (iii) develop and implement State teacher training programs; and (iv) support secondary school preparation or work-based experiences in green collar jobs; (2) to institutions of higher education to— (A) improve the quality of and access to training, certification, and higher education for green collar jobs in the future green economy, such as green construction, design, technology, health, engineering, business, and policy studies, including sustainability science, and with a particular focus on programs that address restructuring institutional incentives and reducing institutional barriers to widespread faculty adoption of interdisciplinary teaching of climate change education; and (B) engage teams of faculty and students to develop applied climate research and deliver to local communities direct services related to local climate mitigation and adaptation issues, with a priority focus on communities impacted by climate change; and (3) to professional associations for projects that build capacity at the State and national levels for continuing education by practicing professionals and the general public in green economy fields. (b) Climate Change Education Office.—There shall be, within the Office of Education of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a Climate Change Education Office to administer the grant program required by subsection (a). SEC. 6. REPORT. Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shall submit to Congress a report that evaluates the scientific merits, educational effectiveness, and broader effects of activities carried out under this Act. SEC. 7. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS. There are authorized to be appropriated to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration $20,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2025 to carry out this Act.
  15. Wm96

    American Public Radio

    Hello, you're listening to Nothing Unconsidered on APR. I'm Michael Moonwilkins. Today we have our interview with Congressman Henry Pinnacle of Arkansas. An old-school, moderate Republican, Congressman Pinnacle has made waves by recently endorsing Speaker John Knox, a Democrat also from Arkansas, for President. We have a ton of news to cover in our next segment of Nothing Unconsidered, so tune in tomorrow to stay up to date! Here to join us is Congressman Pinnacle himself! Thank you for joining us, Congressman. Pinnacle: Michael, thanks for having me on. It’s so great to be here So, you endorsed Speaker Knox for President. Why did you do that? Pinnacle: Under the Fitzgerald Administration, our country has lacked the leadership it deserves on both domestic and international levels. Arkansans and I are seeing Congress become more and more divided, while Fitzgerald bullies his way into getting what he wants at the expense of America’s exceptionalism. Although Speaker Knox and I don’t share the same stances on all the issues, I know we share the same values; like the value of compromise for the greater good of all People, not just those who already agree with you; and the value of power as a means to achieve, not to destroy. I endorsed Speaker Knox because those values are what makes a good leader, not the color of one’s jersey. In response, you have been called a RINO by some Republican media. What is you response to that? Pinnacle: Haha Well, actually I was called a RINO before I endorsed the Speaker. But honestly, Michael, Arkansans don’t care about the names their elected officials are called by people who’ve never been to our State, and who probably pronounce both ‘S’s in “Arkansas.” They care about what their elected leaders do for them. In the short time that I’ve been in the House, I think Arkansans have seen me work tirelessly to advocate for them, and that’s what really matters. Can you tell us some about the ANWR Act and why you think it's a good deal? Pinnacle: Good question. The Arctic National Wildlife Reserve has about 10.6 billion barrels of oil sitting right beneath it. What the ANWR Act would do is open a small portion of that area up to safe oil development, thus boosting the U.S. economy, eliminating our dependence on foreign oil, and creating jobs for tens, maybe hundreds, of thousands of American citizens. You saw Representative Swanner come out against the amended ANWR bill this week. Why do you think that is? Pinnacle: The Congressman’s press release seemed to be expressedly angry with two common-sense provisions of the Bill: one, the requirement that oil development would have to pause if the caribou population—a major food source for the natives in Northern Alaska, who essentially live off of the land we’d be developing on—significantly declined (by 30%) due to drilling, and, two, the allocation of about 6% of the revenue towards the White House’s National Science and Technology Council to research any impact on the climate. It makes no logical sense as to why anyone would be opposed to protecting the people who’d be impacted by this legislation the most. What it really boils down to is Mr. Swanner’s hatred of compromise. Some people would rather pour out a gallon of milk than give a glass to someone else. Some people would rather have $0 than have $300 billion, with a small percentage going towards compromise. I think that’s a shame. Do you think your Republican colleagues in the Senate and President Fitzgerald will pass it? Pinnacle: Although the amended version of the ANWR Act passed the House by a wide margin, with both Democrats and Republicans in favor of it, the Senate decided to pursue passing the old version. Don’t ask me why the Senate took this course, seeing Rep. Faulhammer—the Bill’s original sponsor—voted FOR the amended Bill. It makes just as little sense to me as it does most of us in the House. I’m not sure what actions the President plans to take should the House’s ANWR Act reach his desk, but I hope he does what’s right and signs it. You voted against the gun show loophole act. Why is that? Pinnacle: I voted against the gun show loophole act because I don’t think it’ll do any good to the American people, especially my constituents in Arkansas, to impose arbitrary restrictions and limitations on their 2nd Amendment rights. I think it’s also important to understand that all federal firearms licensees (people selling firearms) already have to confirm the buyer’s legal right to own a gun, regardless of whether he or she is selling out of a store, a gun show, or out the back of their car. What are you working on now? What is your next push in Congress? Pinnacle: Right now, I’m still working day-in and day-out to be an effective Advocate-in-Congress for the people of Arkansas. I recently proposed the Easy A Act, which would make it simpler for students to apply for federal financial aid; and I soon plan to work with my colleagues in Congress to roll out a series of government reforms that’ll reduce wasteful spending and remove the the federal government’s role in private affairs. Thank you, Congressman Pinnacle. Pinnacle: Thanks, Michael. So there you have it. Thanks for listening--tune in tomorrow for our news segment of Nothing Unconsidered. For APR, I'm Michael Moonwilkins.
  16. Wm96

    ANWR Act

    I second
  17. Wm96

    ANWR Act

    Mr. Speaker, Different versions of this bill have been passed by the Senate and House. I move that we table this bill until a conference committee is held and the leadership of both houses can agree on a single version. I yield
  18. IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES April 30, 2019 Received; read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ AN ACT To amend the Public Health Service Act to increase the number of permanent faculty in palliative care at accredited allopathic and osteopathic medical schools, nursing schools, social work schools, and other programs, including physician assistant education programs, to promote education and research in palliative care and hospice, and to support the development of faculty careers in academic palliative medicine. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Palliative Care and Hospice Education and Training Act”. SEC. 2. PALLIATIVE CARE AND HOSPICE EDUCATION AND TRAINING. (a) In General.—Part D of title VII of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 294 et seq.) is amended by inserting after section 759 the following: “SEC. 759A. PALLIATIVE CARE AND HOSPICE EDUCATION AND TRAINING. “(a) Palliative Care And Hospice Education Centers.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—The Secretary shall award grants or contracts under this section to entities described in paragraph (1), (3), or (4) of section 799B, and section 801(2), for the establishment or operation of Palliative Care and Hospice Education Centers that meet the requirements of paragraph (2). “(2) REQUIREMENTS.—A Palliative Care and Hospice Education Center meets the requirements of this paragraph if such Center— “(A) improves the interprofessional team-based training of health professionals in palliative care, including residencies, traineeships, or fellowships; “(B) develops and disseminates interprofessional team-based curricula relating to the palliative treatment of the complex health problems of individuals with serious or life-threatening illnesses; “(C) supports the training and retraining of faculty to provide instruction in interprofessional team-based palliative care; “(D) supports interprofessional team-based continuing education of health professionals who provide palliative care to patients with serious or life-threatening illness; “(E) provides students (including residents, trainees, and fellows) with clinical training in interprofessional team-based palliative care in appropriate health settings, including hospitals, hospices, home care, long-term care facilities, and ambulatory care centers; “(F) establishes traineeships for individuals who are preparing for advanced education nursing degrees, social work degrees, or advanced degrees in physician assistant studies, with a focus in interprofessional team-based palliative care in appropriate health settings, including hospitals, hospices, home care, long-term care facilities, and ambulatory care centers; “(G) supports collaboration between multiple specialty training programs (such as medicine, nursing, social work, physician assistant, chaplaincy, and pharmacy) and clinical training sites to provide training in interprofessional team-based palliative care; and “(H) does not duplicate the activities of existing education centers funded under this section or under section 753 or 865. “(3) EXPANSION OF EXISTING CENTERS.—Nothing in this section shall be construed to— “(A) prevent the Secretary from providing grants to expand existing education centers, including geriatric education centers established under section 753 or 865, to provide for education and training focused specifically on palliative care, including for non-geriatric populations; or “(B) limit the number of education centers that may be funded in a community. “(b) Palliative Medicine Physician Training.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—The Secretary may make grants to, and enter into contracts with, schools of medicine, schools of osteopathic medicine, teaching hospitals, and graduate medical education programs for the purpose of providing support for projects that fund the training of physicians (including residents, trainees, and fellows) who plan to teach palliative medicine. “(2) REQUIREMENTS.—Each project for which a grant or contract is made under this subsection shall— “(A) be staffed by full-time teaching physicians who have experience or training in interprofessional team-based palliative medicine; “(B) be based in a hospice and palliative medicine fellowship program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education; “(C) provide training in interprofessional team-based palliative medicine through a variety of service rotations, such as consultation services, acute care services, extended care facilities, ambulatory care and comprehensive evaluation units, hospices, home care, and community care programs; “(D) develop specific performance-based measures to evaluate the competency of trainees; and “(E) provide training in interprofessional team-based palliative medicine through one or both of the training options described in paragraph (3). “(3) TRAINING OPTIONS.—The training options referred to in subparagraph (E) of paragraph (2) are as follows: “(A) 1-year retraining programs in hospice and palliative medicine for physicians who are faculty at schools of medicine and osteopathic medicine, or others determined appropriate by the Secretary. “(B) 1- or 2-year training programs that are designed to provide training in interprofessional team-based hospice and palliative medicine for physicians who have completed graduate medical education programs in any medical specialty leading to board eligibility in hospice and palliative medicine pursuant to the American Board of Medical Specialties. “(4) DEFINITIONS.—For purposes of this subsection, the term ‘graduate medical education’ means a program sponsored by a school of medicine, a school of osteopathic medicine, a hospital, or a public or private institution that— “(A) offers postgraduate medical training in the specialties and subspecialties of medicine; and “(B) has been accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education or the American Osteopathic Association through its Committee on Postdoctoral Training. “(c) Palliative Medicine And Hospice Academic Career Awards.— “(1) ESTABLISHMENT OF PROGRAM.—The Secretary shall establish a program to provide awards, to be known as the ‘Palliative Medicine and Hospice Academic Career Awards’, to eligible individuals to promote the career development of such individuals as academic hospice and palliative care physicians. “(2) ELIGIBLE INDIVIDUALS.—To be eligible to receive an award under paragraph (1), an individual shall— “(A) be board certified or board eligible in hospice and palliative medicine; and “(B) have a junior (non-tenured) faculty appointment at an accredited (as determined by the Secretary) school of medicine or osteopathic medicine. “(3) LIMITATIONS.—No award under paragraph (1) may be made to an eligible individual unless the individual— “(A) has submitted to the Secretary an application, at such time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Secretary may require, and the Secretary has approved such application; “(B) provides, in such form and manner as the Secretary may require, assurances that the individual will meet the service requirement described in paragraph (6); and “(C) provides, in such form and manner as the Secretary may require, assurances that the individual has a full-time faculty appointment in a health professions institution and documented commitment from such institution to spend a majority of the total funded time of such individual on teaching and developing skills in education in interprofessional team-based palliative care. “(4) MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT.—An eligible individual who receives an award under paragraph (1) shall provide assurances to the Secretary that funds provided to the eligible individual under this subsection will be used only to supplement, not to supplant, the amount of Federal, State, and local funds otherwise expended by the eligible individual. “(5) AMOUNT AND TERM.— “(A) AMOUNT.—The amount of an award under this subsection shall be equal to the award amount provided for under section 753(c)(5)(A) for the fiscal year involved. “(B) TERM.—The term of an award made under this subsection shall not exceed 5 years. “(C) PAYMENT TO INSTITUTION.—The Secretary shall make payments for awards under this subsection to institutions, including schools of medicine and osteopathic medicine. “(6) SERVICE REQUIREMENT.—An individual who receives an award under this subsection shall provide training in palliative care and hospice, including the training of interprofessional teams of health care professionals. The provision of such training shall constitute a majority of the total funded obligations of such individual under the award. “(d) Palliative Care Workforce Development.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—The Secretary shall award grants or contracts under this subsection to entities that operate a Palliative Care and Hospice Education Center pursuant to subsection (a)(1). “(2) APPLICATION.—To be eligible for an award under paragraph (1), an entity described in such paragraph shall submit to the Secretary an application at such time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Secretary may require. “(3) USE OF FUNDS.—Amounts awarded under a grant or contract under paragraph (1) shall be used to carry out the fellowship program described in paragraph (4). “(4) FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM.— “(A) IN GENERAL.—Pursuant to paragraph (3), a Palliative Care and Hospice Education Center that receives an award under this subsection shall use such funds to offer short-term intensive courses (referred to in this subsection as a ‘fellowship’) that focus on interprofessional team-based palliative care that provide supplemental training for faculty members in medical schools and other health professions schools with programs in psychology, pharmacy, nursing, social work, physician assistant education, chaplaincy, or other health disciplines, as approved by the Secretary. Such a fellowship shall be open to current faculty, and appropriately credentialed volunteer faculty and practitioners, who do not have formal training in palliative care, to upgrade their knowledge and clinical skills for the care of individuals with serious or life-threatening illness and to enhance their interdisciplinary and interprofessional teaching skills. “(B) LOCATION.—A fellowship under this paragraph shall be offered either at the Palliative Care and Hospice Education Center that is sponsoring the course, in collaboration with other Palliative Care and Hospice Education Centers, or at medical schools, schools of nursing, schools of pharmacy, schools of social work, schools of chaplaincy or pastoral care education, graduate programs in psychology, physician assistant education programs, or other health professions schools approved by the Secretary with which the Centers are affiliated. “(C) CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT.—Participation in a fellowship under this paragraph shall be accepted with respect to complying with continuing health profession education requirements. As a condition of such acceptance, the recipient shall subsequently provide a minimum of 18 hours of voluntary instruction in palliative care content (that has been approved by a palliative care and hospice education center) to students or trainees in health-related educational, home, hospice, or long-term care settings. “(5) TARGETS.—A Palliative Care and Hospice Education Center that receives an award under paragraph (1) shall meet targets approved by the Secretary for providing training in interprofessional team-based palliative care to a certain number of faculty or practitioners during the term of the award, as well as other parameters established by the Secretary. “(6) AMOUNT OF AWARD.—Each award under paragraph (1) shall be in the amount of $150,000. Not more than 24 Palliative Care and Hospice Education Centers may receive an award under such paragraph. “(7) MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT.—A Palliative Care and Hospice Education Center that receives an award under paragraph (1) shall provide assurances to the Secretary that funds provided to the Center under the award will be used only to supplement, not to supplant, the amount of Federal, State, and local funds otherwise expended by such Center. “(e) Palliative Care And Hospice Career Incentive Awards.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—The Secretary shall award grants or contracts under this subsection to individuals described in paragraph (2) to foster greater interest among a variety of health professionals in entering the field of palliative care. “(2) ELIGIBLE INDIVIDUALS.—To be eligible to receive an award under paragraph (1), an individual shall— “(A) be an advanced practice nurse, a social worker, physician assistant, pharmacist, chaplain, or student of psychology who is pursuing a doctorate, masters, or other advanced degree with a focus in interprofessional team-based palliative care or related fields in an accredited health professions school; and “(B) submit to the Secretary an application at such time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Secretary may require. “(3) CONDITIONS OF AWARD.—As a condition of receiving an award under paragraph (1), an individual shall agree that, following completion of the award period, the individual will teach or practice palliative care in health-related educational, home, hospice, or long-term care settings for a minimum of 5 years under guidelines established by the Secretary. “(4) PAYMENT TO INSTITUTION.—The Secretary shall make payments for awards under paragraph (1) to institutions that include schools of medicine, osteopathic medicine, nursing, social work, psychology, chaplaincy or pastoral care education, dentistry, and pharmacy, or other allied health discipline in an accredited health professions school or program (such as a physician assistant education program) that is approved by the Secretary. “(f) Authorization Of Appropriations.—There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section, $15,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2019 through 2023.”. (b) Effective Date.—The amendment made by this section shall be effective beginning on the date that is 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act. SEC. 3. HOSPICE AND PALLIATIVE NURSING. (a) Nurse Education, Practice, And Quality Grants.—Section 831(b)(3) of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 296p(b)(3)) is amended by inserting “hospice and palliative nursing,” after “coordinated care,”. (b) Palliative Care And Hospice Education And Training Programs.—Part D of title VIII of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 296p et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following: “SEC. 832. PALLIATIVE CARE AND HOSPICE EDUCATION AND TRAINING. “(a) Program Authorized.—The Secretary shall award grants to eligible entities to develop and implement, in coordination with programs under section 759A, programs and initiatives to train and educate individuals in providing interprofessional team-based palliative care in health-related educational, hospital, hospice, home, or long-term care settings. “(b) Use Of Funds.—An eligible entity that receives a grant under subsection (a) shall use funds under such grant to— “(1) provide training to individuals who will provide palliative care in health-related educational, hospital, home, hospice, or long-term care settings; “(2) develop and disseminate curricula relating to palliative care in health-related educational, hospital, home, hospice, or long-term care settings; “(3) train faculty members in palliative care in health-related educational, hospital, home, hospice, or long-term care settings; or “(4) provide continuing education to individuals who provide palliative care in health-related educational, home, hospice, or long-term care settings. “(c) Application.—An eligible entity desiring a grant under subsection (a) shall submit an application to the Secretary at such time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Secretary may reasonably require. “(d) Eligible Entity.—For purposes of this section, the term ‘eligible entity’ shall include a school of nursing, a health care facility, a program leading to certification as a certified nurse assistant, a partnership of such a school and facility, or a partnership of such a program and facility. “(e) Authorization Of Appropriations.—There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section $5,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2019 through 2023.”. SEC. 4. DISSEMINATION OF PALLIATIVE CARE INFORMATION. Part A of title IX of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 299 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following new section: “SEC. 904. DISSEMINATION OF PALLIATIVE CARE INFORMATION. “(a) In General.—Under the authority under section 902(a) to disseminate information on health care and on systems for the delivery of such care, the Director may disseminate information to inform patients, families, and health professionals about the benefits of palliative care throughout the continuum of care for patients with serious or life-threatening illness. “(b) Information Disseminated.— “(1) MANDATORY INFORMATION.—If the Director elects to disseminate information under subsection (a), such dissemination shall include the following: “(A) PALLIATIVE CARE.—Information, resources, and communication materials about palliative care as an essential part of the continuum of quality care for patients and families facing serious or life-threatening illness (including cancer; heart, kidney, liver, lung, and infectious diseases; as well as neurodegenerative disease such as dementia, Parkinson’s disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). “(B) PALLIATIVE CARE SERVICES.—Specific information regarding the services provided to patients by professionals trained in hospice and palliative care, including pain and symptom management, support for shared decisionmaking, care coordination, psychosocial care, and spiritual care, explaining that such services may be provided starting at the point of diagnosis and alongside curative treatment and are intended to— “(i) provide patient-centered and family-centered support throughout the continuum of care for serious and life-threatening illness; “(ii) anticipate, prevent, and treat physical, emotional, social, and spiritual suffering; “(iii) optimize quality of life; and “(iv) facilitate and support the goals and values of patients and families. “(C) PALLIATIVE CARE PROFESSIONALS.—Specific materials that explain the role of professionals trained in hospice and palliative care in providing team-based care (including pain and symptom management, support for shared decisionmaking, care coordination, psychosocial care, and spiritual care) for patients and families throughout the continuum of care for serious or life-threatening illness. “(D) RESEARCH.—Evidence-based research demonstrating the benefits of patient access to palliative care throughout the continuum of care for serious or life-threatening illness. “(E) POPULATION-SPECIFIC MATERIALS.—Materials targeting specific populations, including patients with serious or life-threatening illness who are among medically underserved populations (as defined in section 330(b)(3)) and families of such patients or health professionals serving medically underserved populations. Such populations shall include pediatric patients, young adult and adolescent patients, racial and ethnic minority populations, and other priority populations specified by the Director “(2) REQUIRED PUBLICATION.—Information and materials disseminated under paragraph (1) shall be posted on the Internet websites of relevant Federal agencies and departments, including the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and the Administration on Aging. “(c) Consultation.—The Director shall consult with appropriate professional societies, hospice and palliative care stakeholders, and relevant patient advocate organizations with respect to palliative care, psychosocial care, and complex chronic illness with respect to the following: “(1) The planning and implementation of the dissemination of palliative care information under this section. “(2) The development of information to be disseminated under this section. “(3) A definition of the term ‘serious or life-threatening illness’ for purposes of this section.”. SEC. 5. CLARIFICATION. None of the funds made available under this Act (or an amendment made by this Act) may be used to provide, promote, or provide training with regard to any item or service for which Federal funding is unavailable under section 3 of Public Law 105–12 (42 U.S.C. 14402). SEC. 6. ENHANCING NIH RESEARCH IN PALLIATIVE CARE. (a) In General.—Part B of title IV of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 284 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following new section: “SEC. 409K. ENHANCING RESEARCH IN PALLIATIVE CARE. “The Secretary, acting through the Director of the National Institutes of Health, shall develop and implement a strategy to be applied across the institutes and centers of the National Institutes of Health to expand and intensify national research programs in palliative care in order to address the quality of care and quality of life for the rapidly growing population of patients in the United States with serious or life-threatening illnesses, including cancer; heart, kidney, liver, lung, and infectious diseases; as well as neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia, Parkinson’s disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.”. (b) Expanding Trans-Nih Research Reporting To Include Palliative Care Research.—Section 402A(c)(2)(B) of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 282a(c)(2)(B)) is amended by inserting “and, beginning January 1, 2019, for conducting or supporting research with respect to palliative care” after “or national centers”. SEC. 7. CUT-GO OFFSET. The total amount authorized to be appropriated to the Office of the Secretary of Health and Human Services for each of fiscal years 2019 through 2023 is the amount that is $20,000,000 below the total amount appropriated to such Office for fiscal year 2018.
  19. Wm96

    Knox Family Hosts BBQ in Dallas

    Hey Mr. Knox! Two questions: 1. What is your plan for healthcare? 2. I’ve been really struck by the gridlock in government right now. How will you make Washington more bipartisan?
  20. Wm96

    Pinnacle Family Hosts Fish Fry

    Hello Mr. Pinnacle, What do you think is the #1 issue facing the country right now?
  21. Wm96

    @MarkRamborTX

    My DEA Enforcement Act is the future of drug enforcement. Prescription opioids have claimed too many lives. It’s time to do something about it.
  22. Wm96

    @MarkRamborTX

    Official Twitter account of Senate Minority Leader Mark Rambor of Texas.
  23. Hello, You're listening to Thinking on Air on APR, I'm Michael Moonwilkins. Welcome to our first Q&A on APR. Feel free to ask anything about the news or our interpretation of it. We're looking forward to answering your questions the best we can. Also, we would like to remind our listeners that the opinions expressed here are those of mine and my team, not APR as a whole, and that we screen all questions and reserve the right to screen out any question for any reason. So ask away. This will be fun!
  24. This a question we get a lot, and first I'd like to clear up a misconception that seems to be floating around. While Senator Bennett is clearly pro-life, Speaker Knox is not. If you listen to either of the debates hosted here on APR, Speaker Knox clearly stated that he supports women's right to choose. He has said that he is "personally pro-life" in that he would like to see fewer abortions performed, but he affirmed twice that he'd try to make it "safe, legal, and rare" as President. But, back to the original question, I believe there is no gold standard of liberalism. Are either Bernie Sanders? No. Are either as liberal as many Democrats, now or in the past? Probably not. Are both more progressive than President Fitzgerald? Definitely. Whether a candidate is far enough left for you is a deeply personal question, so there isn't a definitive answer. I'm sure this line of questioning will continue for the coming months, though!
  25. This is interesting. I’m sure the GOP leadership is going to be fuming about this. I don’t think we’ll see anything like switching parties or disavowing of Pinnacle by the GOP, but I don’t anticipate seeing Pinnacle in any leadership positions anytime soon. As for the Democratic Primary, I’m not sure. Bennett is very often viewed as the more conservative candidate, so a Republican endorsement might help Knox take those voters from him, but it could go either way. My prediction is that it doesn’t make a huge difference. Thanks for calling.
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