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TexAgRepublican

CH Republicans
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TexAgRepublican last won the day on April 17

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  1. Kyle Fitzgerald The White House For Immediate Release Washington, DC – President Kyle Fitzgerald spoke to the press about an executive order to allow the importation of popular Russian firearms. “I have signed an Executive Order to repeal an Obama-era sanction that banned the importation of popular firearms produced in Russia by Kalashnikov Concern, a weapons manufacturer. As was noted in an NRA press release in 2014, this particular sanction likely had more to do with restricting Second Amendment rights here at home than furthering America’s geopolitical interests abroad. “As our hugely successful military alliance with the Russian Federation against ISIS continues, it may be time to reevaluate the nature of our relationship with Russia. In the past few years, Russia’s disposition on the world stage has changed dramatically for the better. In 2018, Russia hosted the World Cup, the most significant global sporting event in the world outside of the Olympics. In East Asia, instead of displaying military aggression, Russia instead acted as a broker of peace, defusing a tense situation between two regional powers. And in Syria, Russia has committed its military to helping us defeat ISIS. In the fight against ISIS, Americans and Russians have shed blood together for a common cause. All of this suggests that Russia is becoming a more responsible and cooperative player on the world stage.” View full PR
  2. The White House For Immediate Release Washington, DC – President Kyle Fitzgerald spoke to the press about an executive order to allow the importation of popular Russian firearms. “I have signed an Executive Order to repeal an Obama-era sanction that banned the importation of popular firearms produced in Russia by Kalashnikov Concern, a weapons manufacturer. As was noted in an NRA press release in 2014, this particular sanction likely had more to do with restricting Second Amendment rights here at home than furthering America’s geopolitical interests abroad. “As our hugely successful military alliance with the Russian Federation against ISIS continues, it may be time to reevaluate the nature of our relationship with Russia. In the past few years, Russia’s disposition on the world stage has changed dramatically for the better. In 2018, Russia hosted the World Cup, the most significant global sporting event in the world outside of the Olympics. In East Asia, instead of displaying military aggression, Russia instead acted as a broker of peace, defusing a tense situation between two regional powers. And in Syria, Russia has committed its military to helping us defeat ISIS. In the fight against ISIS, Americans and Russians have shed blood together for a common cause. All of this suggests that Russia is becoming a more responsible and cooperative player on the world stage.”
  3. TexAgRepublican

    Federal Budget Act of FY2021-FY2024

    Mr. Speaker, I think the Gentlemen from Arkansas and West Virginia wildly exaggerate the effects of this budget. This is a fair budget that I'm proud to sponsor. First of all this budget actually raises more revenue than it cuts spending. Let's keep that in perspective. This administration does not have the "backs of the rich" because this budget actually increases the tax burden of the wealthiest Americans. This administration is not "killing" infrastructure, not when we are investing a trillion dollars in our infrastructure over the next decade. This budget doesn't "kill" healthcare, it actually makes Medicare more sustainable by authorizing the program to negotiate drug prices. This administration is not hurting the economy of Appalachia, they have helped it by gutting Obama-era coal regulations. This administration isn't killing small businesses - it helped them by cutting taxes for the middle class. But as awful as this budget allegedly is, I've been told by the Gentleman from Arkansas that he and his colleagues will vote for it anyway if we make a few changes. I propose the following changes, to be considered as one amendment: Discretionary Spending 2021 2022 2023 2024 Defense $435,000,000,000 $435,000,000,000 $435,000,000,000 $435,000,000,000 Education $82,602,000,000 $82,602,000,000 $82,602,000,000 $82,602,000,000 Transportation $72,471,000,000 $72,471,000,000 $72,471,000,000 $72,471,000,000 Social Security, Unemployment & Labor $55,300,000,000 $55,300,000,000 $55,300,000,000 $55,300,000,000 Veterans' Benefits $66,400,000,000 $66,400,000,000 $66,400,000,000 $66,400,000,000 Government $32,011,000,000 $32,011,000,000 $32,011,000,000 $32,011,000,000 Medicare & Healthcare $34,271,000,000 $34,271,000,000 $34,271,000,000 $34,271,000,000 International Affairs $22,800,000,000 $22,800,000,000 $22,800,000,000 $22,800,000,000 Energy & Environment $37,276,000,000 $37,276,000,000 $37,276,000,000 $37,276,000,000 Science, Space & Technology $27,100,000,000 $27,100,000,000 $27,100,000,000 $27,100,000,000 Housing & Community $9,204,000,000 $9,204,000,000 $9,204,000,000 $9,204,000,000 Agriculture $5,770,000,000 $5,770,000,000 $5,770,000,000 $5,770,000,000 Total Discretionary Spending $880,155,000,000 $880,155,000,000 $880,155,000,000 $880,155,000,000 1. Rural Utilities Service ($598 million) 5. Appalachian Regional Commission ($78 million) 2. FEC funding for school internet service ($2.25 billion) 9. Small Business Administration ($1 billion) 11. Commission of Fine Arts ($10 million) 5. Rural Health Outreach and Flexibility grants ($98 million) SEC. 3. TORT REFORM. (a) The statute of limitations is three years after the injury or one year after the claimant discovers the injury, whichever occurs first. (b) Non-economic damages are limited to $250,000. (c) Punitive damages are limited to $500,000. (d) $10 billion is subtracted from "Medicare and Healthcare" from FY2021 to FY2024 as a result of the changes in this section. SEC. 6. ALASKAN NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE. (a) The coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is opened to leasing. I yield.
  4. TexAgRepublican

    @audreyvanhorn

    We’re done in Afghanistan. We had a mission, and we won. Perhaps Europe should pick up the tab for round 2.
  5. Kyle Fitzgerald The White House For Immediate Release Washington, DC – President Kyle Fitzgerald spoke to the press about an executive order to suspend travel from Afghanistan. “Our administration is taking the rise of the Islamic Jihad Union in Afghanistan very seriously. That is why today I signed an executive order that immediately suspends travel from Afghanistan for an indefinite period of time. This executive order will ensure that IJU terrorists posing as refugees, travelers, or immigrants cannot enter our country and commit acts of terror on our soil. The safety of the American people is my top priority.” View full PR
  6. The White House For Immediate Release Washington, DC – President Kyle Fitzgerald spoke to the press about an executive order to suspend travel from Afghanistan. “Our administration is taking the rise of the Islamic Jihad Union in Afghanistan very seriously. That is why today I signed an executive order that immediately suspends travel from Afghanistan for an indefinite period of time. This executive order will ensure that IJU terrorists posing as refugees, travelers, or immigrants cannot enter our country and commit acts of terror on our soil. The safety of the American people is my top priority.”
  7. TexAgRepublican

    Military Pay Raise Act

    cs
  8. TexAgRepublican

    Executive Orders

    Executive Order #15 Re: Executive Order 13661 (a) Executive Order 13661 is hereby repealed. (b) This order shall take effect immediately. /s/ Kyle Fitzgerald President of the United States
  9. TexAgRepublican

    @POTUS

    Coalition attacks are destroying ISIS. Huge progress so far. Our brave men + women in uniform are making America – and the world – safer.
  10. TexAgRepublican

    Executive Orders

    Executive Order #14 Re: Suspension of Travel from Afghanistan (a) All travel from the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, as well as visa issuance to their nationals or residents, shall be suspended indefinitely. (b) Citizens and lawful permanent residents of the United States are exempt from this order. /s/ Kyle Fitzgerald President of the United States
  11. TexAgRepublican

    President Introduces FY2021-2024 Budget

    Kyle Fitzgerald The White House For Immediate Release Washington, DC – President Kyle Fitzgerald introduced the FY 2021-2024 federal budget at a press briefing. “What I am proud to introduce to you today is the result of many hours of work among our staff to put together the nation’s fiscal plan for the next four years. Before we got to work on this project, I told my staff that I had several goals for this budget. First, I wanted out deficit at the end to be less than what we inherited from President Obama. Second, I wanted it to be a fair budget that relied equally on both spending cuts and changes to the tax code. Third, I didn’t want to touch entitlements because Social Security and Medicare really aren’t entitlements – they’re earned benefits that American workers spent their lives paying for. Instead of cutting those programs, I wanted to strengthen them. “Our budget accomplishes all of these goals. Our deficit in 2024 will be $483 billion dollars. While that seems like a lot – and it is – it’s still over $100 billion less than what we inherited under President Obama. Our deficit in 2016 the year before we took office was $587 billion and climbing. This budget clearly reverses the trend that was going quickly in the wrong direction. “Our budget relies equally on spending cuts and tax reform to reduce the deficit. There are about $174 billion worth of spending cuts annually in this budget and $178 billion of additional revenue from changes to the tax code. Those numbers are roughly very equal. We did not cut spending from Veterans Affairs, Science and Technology, or Agriculture. We made very minimal cuts to Education, which will receive the second largest portion of discretionary spending in our budget. Most of the changes to the tax code will only affect big corporations and the wealthy by limiting or eliminating many deductions and loopholes that have been abused for years by those who have the most ability to pay. “As I promised during the campaign, we did not cut Social Security or Medicare benefits. Instead, we strengthened these programs and made them more sustainable in the future by removing the limit of taxable income for the FICA tax and by authorizing Medicare to negotiate the price of prescription drugs. These reforms will save over $120 billion per year and will ensure that these programs remain available for American retirees for generations to come. “Our administration had some very ambitions policy goals when we took office, and some of those goals – like tax cuts and infrastructure – were very expensive. But this budget proves that we seek to be responsible stewards of government and that we are willing to do what is necessary to pay for what we buy – just like the typical American family. Furthermore, as we can see in these budget projections, our investments in tax cuts and infrastructure are going to pay dividends for our economy over the next few years and will ultimately pay for themselves. Our nation is on a solid financial path. The deficit might not be quite where we want it to be right now, but we’re on a much better track than we were a few years ago.” View full PR
  12. The White House For Immediate Release Washington, DC – President Kyle Fitzgerald introduced the FY 2021-2024 federal budget at a press briefing. “What I am proud to introduce to you today is the result of many hours of work among our staff to put together the nation’s fiscal plan for the next four years. Before we got to work on this project, I told my staff that I had several goals for this budget. First, I wanted out deficit at the end to be less than what we inherited from President Obama. Second, I wanted it to be a fair budget that relied equally on both spending cuts and changes to the tax code. Third, I didn’t want to touch entitlements because Social Security and Medicare really aren’t entitlements – they’re earned benefits that American workers spent their lives paying for. Instead of cutting those programs, I wanted to strengthen them. “Our budget accomplishes all of these goals. Our deficit in 2024 will be $483 billion dollars. While that seems like a lot – and it is – it’s still over $100 billion less than what we inherited under President Obama. Our deficit in 2016 the year before we took office was $587 billion and climbing. This budget clearly reverses the trend that was going quickly in the wrong direction. “Our budget relies equally on spending cuts and tax reform to reduce the deficit. There are about $174 billion worth of spending cuts annually in this budget and $178 billion of additional revenue from changes to the tax code. Those numbers are roughly very equal. We did not cut spending from Veterans Affairs, Science and Technology, or Agriculture. We made very minimal cuts to Education, which will receive the second largest portion of discretionary spending in our budget. Most of the changes to the tax code will only affect big corporations and the wealthy by limiting or eliminating many deductions and loopholes that have been abused for years by those who have the most ability to pay. “As I promised during the campaign, we did not cut Social Security or Medicare benefits. Instead, we strengthened these programs and made them more sustainable in the future by removing the limit of taxable income for the FICA tax and by authorizing Medicare to negotiate the price of prescription drugs. These reforms will save over $120 billion per year and will ensure that these programs remain available for American retirees for generations to come. “Our administration had some very ambitions policy goals when we took office, and some of those goals – like tax cuts and infrastructure – were very expensive. But this budget proves that we seek to be responsible stewards of government and that we are willing to do what is necessary to pay for what we buy – just like the typical American family. Furthermore, as we can see in these budget projections, our investments in tax cuts and infrastructure are going to pay dividends for our economy over the next few years and will ultimately pay for themselves. Our nation is on a solid financial path. The deficit might not be quite where we want it to be right now, but we’re on a much better track than we were a few years ago.”
  13. TexAgRepublican

    Ward holds Beer Hall Townhall in Birmingham

    You were a big supporter of the withdrawal from Afghanistan, even lamenting that it wasn't happening fast enough. Do you agree with your opponent, Louie Hong, that we're "back at square one" now as a result of the President doing what you wanted?
  14. TexAgRepublican

    Federal Budget Act of FY2021-FY2024

    Ms. Van Horn, on behalf of President Fitzgerald, submits A BILL To fund the federal government from FY2021 through FY2024 and for other purposes. SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. (a) This act shall be cited as the Federal Budget Act of FY2021-FY2024. SEC. 2. SPENDING LEVELS. The following amount of money shall be appropriated for discretionary spending in the fiscal years of 2021 through 2024. Discretionary Spending 2021 2022 2023 2024 Defense $435,000,000,000 $435,000,000,000 $435,000,000,000 $435,000,000,000 Education $80,325,000,000 $80,325,000,000 $80,325,000,000 $80,325,000,000 Transportation $72,471,000,000 $72,471,000,000 $72,471,000,000 $72,471,000,000 Social Security, Unemployment & Labor $55,300,000,000 $55,300,000,000 $55,300,000,000 $55,300,000,000 Veterans' Benefits $66,400,000,000 $66,400,000,000 $66,400,000,000 $66,400,000,000 Government $31,001,000,000 $31,001,000,000 $31,001,000,000 $31,001,000,000 Medicare & Healthcare $24,173,000,000 $24,173,000,000 $24,173,000,000 $24,173,000,000 International Affairs $22,800,000,000 $22,800,000,000 $22,800,000,000 $22,800,000,000 Energy & Environment $37,276,000,000 $37,276,000,000 $37,276,000,000 $37,276,000,000 Science, Space & Technology $27,100,000,000 $27,100,000,000 $27,100,000,000 $27,100,000,000 Housing & Community $8,528,000,000 $8,528,000,000 $8,528,000,000 $8,528,000,000 Agriculture $5,770,000,000 $5,770,000,000 $5,770,000,000 $5,770,000,000 Total Discretionary Spending $866,121,000,000 $866,121,000,000 $866,121,000,000 $866,121,000,000 The following programs and spending will be eliminated: (a) Housing and Community 1. Rural Utilities Service ($598 million) 2. Economic Development Administration ($523 million) 3. NeighborWorks America ($480 million) 4. Community Development Financial Institutions Fund ($103 million) 5. Appalachian Regional Commission ($78 million) 6. Denali Commission ($48 million) 7. Minority Development Business Agency ($31 million) 8. Delta Regional Authority ($8 million) 9. Community Development Financial Institutions Fund ($103 million) (b) Education 1. state grants for Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities ($298 million) 2. FEC funding for school internet service ($2.25 billion) (c) Energy and Environment 1. Science to Achieve Results Program ($63 million) 2. Suspend federal land purchases ($200 million) 3. Army Corps of Engineers funding for beach replenishment projects ($61 million) (d) Government 1. Suspend acquisition of federal office space ($1 billion) 2. Presidential Election Campaign Fund ($215 million) 3. Discontinue the maintenance of vacant federal properties ($25 billion) 4. All Justice Department grants except those from the Bureau of Justice Statistics and the National Institute of Justice ($7.334 billion) 5. Legal Services Corporation ($398 million) 6. Community Relations Service ($32 million) 7. Office of National Drug Control Policy ($30 million) 8. State Justice Institute ($4 million) 9. Small Business Administration ($1 billion) 10. Institute of Museum Services and Library Services ($263 million) 11. Commission of Fine Arts ($10 million) 12. National Capital Planning Commission ($8 million) 13. Advisory Council on Historic Preservation ($5 million) (e) Medicare and Healthcare 1. Maternal and Child Health Block Grant ($673 million) 2. Health Professions grants ($414 million) 3. Title X Family Planning ($327 million) 4. National Health Service Corps ($15 million) 5. Rural Health Outreach and Flexibility grants ($98 million) 6. Amend Title XVIII (Medicare) of the Social Security Act to require the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to negotiate with pharmaceutical companies regarding prices for drugs covered under the Medicare prescription drug benefit. ($22 billion) (f) International Affairs 1. Reduce Foreign Aid by 50% with no reductions to the State of Israel ($22.35 billion) (g) Social Security, Unemployment & Labor 1. The Davis-Bacon Act of 1931 (Pub.L. 71–798) is hereby repealed. ($9 billion) 2. Ban project labor agreements on all federally funded construction projects ($2 billion) (h) Transportation 1. Maritime Administration ($554 million) 2. Essential Air Service ($125 million) 3. Privatize Amtrak ($1.9 billion) (g) Defense 1. Overseas Contingency Operations ($65 billion) SEC. 3. TORT REFORM. (a) The statute of limitations is three years after the injury or one year after the claimant discovers the injury, whichever occurs first. (b) Non-economic damages are limited to $250,000. (c) Punitive damages are limited to $500,000. (d) $10 billion is subtracted from "Medicare and Healthcare" from FY2021 to FY2024 as a result of the changes in this section. SEC. 4. CHANGES TO THE TAX CODE. (a) Section 2 of the America First Tax Reform Act is amended to read as follows: "(a) The new tax brackets for individual taxes shall be as follows: Rate Single Filers Married Joint Filers Head of Household Filers 0% $0 to $37,650 $0 to $75,300 $0 to $50,400 25% $37,650 to $91,150 $75,300 to $151,900 $50,400 to $130,150 28% $91,150 to $190,150 $151,900 to $231,450 $130,150 to $210,800 33% $190,150 to $413,350 $231,450 to $413,350 $210,800 to $413,350 35% $413,350 to $415,050 $413,350 to $466,950 $413,350 to $441,000 39.6% $415,050 to $5,000,000 $466,950 to $5,000,000 $441,000 to $5,000,000 44% $5,000,000+ $5,000,000+ $5,000,000+ " (b) Section 7 of the America First Tax Reform Act is amended to read as follows: "(a) A 15 35 percent tariff will be imposed at the point of entry on all manufactured goods imported to the United States that originate from a production facility that was outsourced from the United States following the enactment of this act." (c) Section 8 of the America First Tax Reform Act is repealed. (d) Households which claim annual income of at least $413,350 may not claim more than 28% of their existing returns as tax deductible. (e) The cap on taxable earnings for the Federal Insurance Contributions Act Tax is removed. (f) Repatriation of foreign-source income will be taxed at a discount rate of 15.5% for liquid assets and 8% for illiquid assets from FY2021 through FY2024, returning to normal rates in FY2025. (g) The following corporate tax deductions are hereby repealed: 1. Deferral of active income of foreign corporations controlled by U.S. shareholders. 2. Accelerated depreciation of machinery and equipment. 3. Exclusion of interest on public purpose state and local bonds. 4. Credit for low income housing investments. 5. Exclusion of interest on life insurance savings. 6. Exclusion of interest on hospital construction bonds. 7. Deductibility of charitable contributions. (h) The Additional Child Tax Credit is repealed. SEC. 5. WAR ON TERROR VICTORY FUND. (a) $450,000,000 is appropriated annually to "International Affairs" from FY2021 through FY2024 to the Islamic Republic of Pakistan for the purpose of defeating Al-Qaeda and winning the War on Terror. SEC. 6. ALASKAN NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE. (a) The coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is opened to leasing. PES: Total revenue: 2021: $3,201,331,095,570 2022: $3,342,349,740,140 2023: $3,492,824,548,556 2024: $3,653,535,896,616 Total spending (including mandatory/entitlements): 2021: $3,928,401,972,900 2022: $3,996,036,495,899 2023: $4,065,694,255,527 2024: $4,137,446,636,809 Deficit: 2021: $727,070,877,330 2022: $653,686,755,759 2023: $572,869,706,971 2024: $483,910,740,193
  15. TexAgRepublican

    Raheem Ramsey Makes Presidential Endorsement

    Your opponents in the primary are being shady af, that's what's happening.
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