Jump to content
TedderVision

TexAgRepublican

Members
  • Content Count

    3,425
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    47

TexAgRepublican last won the day on March 6

TexAgRepublican had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

516 Excellent

8 Followers

About TexAgRepublican

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Recent Profile Visitors

3,651 profile views
  1. Audrey Van Horn 1. Fundraiser - California (2 hours) 2. Fundraiser - New York (2 hours)
  2. Jack Swanner 1. Fundraiser - California (2 hours) 2. Fundraiser - Texas (2 hours)
  3. Kyle Fitzgerald 1. Fundraiser - Texas (2 hours) 2. Fundraiser - California (2 hours)
  4. Mr. President, Given the time constraints and the unanimous consent of both parties achieved in the House, I move to suspend and pass the Federal Budget Act of FY2022-FY2023. I yield.
  5. The Office of Senator Kyle Fitzgerald For Immediate Release Washington, DC – Senate Majority Leader Kyle Fitzgerald (R-TX) spoke to the press after introducing the Election Integrity Act on behalf of President Vang. “If we don’t have free and fair elections – and the American people find out – then all bets are off. Everything our society is based on suddenly falls apart. That is why I introduced the Election Integrity Act on behalf of President Vang. Most of the rest of the world requires some kind of ID to vote, especially the industrialized world. The best form of ID is a photo ID because it’s a common form of identification and you match up the voters’ face with what you see on the ID card, such as a driver’s license. By requiring voters to present photo ID at the polling place, the American people can rest assured that our elections are being decided fairly.”
  6. The Office of Senator Kyle Fitzgerald For Immediate Release Washington, DC – Senate Majority Leader Kyle Fitzgerald (R-TX) spoke to the press after introducing the Miner Protection Act on behalf of President Vang. “We need to promote an energy future that features American coal, and we need to support all coal miners – past, present and future. That is why I introduced the Miner Protection Act on behalf of President Vang. This bill preserves the pensions of United Mine Workers of America employees. These miners were promised a pension, and that promise should be fulfilled. I’m a firm believer in that. It’s like a contract. If you’re promised a set amount of money – whether you’re a miner or a teacher or any other worker counting on Social Security – you are entitled to that money on the schedule that was promised. “This bill also prevents a future President from imposing an Obama-style moratorium on coal leasing without congressional approval. This will protect America’s coal industry and the many jobs that depend on it while ensuring that America is always a world leader in energy production. The world’s energy demands can only be met by producing fossil fuels like coal. Either that coal is going to be mined in China, or it’s going to be mined in America. I would rather it be mined in America so we can create jobs for our people and not be reliant on the rest of the world for our energy.”
  7. The Office of Senator Kyle Fitzgerald For Immediate Release Washington, DC – Senate Majority Leader Kyle Fitzgerald (R-TX) spoke to the press after introducing the Expanding American Agricultural Trade and Exports Act on behalf of President Vang. “When people talk about trade policy, usually they’re talking about protecting American industries from foreign imports. However, promoting American exports is equally as important. That is why I introduced the Expanding American Agricultural Trade and Exports Act on behalf of President Vang. Agricultural products are among our country’s top exports. This bill makes it easier for American farmers to sell their products all over the world by extending and expanding federal programs that boost American agricultural exports. President Vang and Senate Republicans are committed to supporting American farmers.”
  8. PES: Nationwide voter ID law IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES Senator Fitzgerald (On the behalf of the Vang Administration, with thanks to Mr. Messer) introduce the following bill; A BILL To amend the Help America Vote Act of 2002 to require voters in elections for Federal office to provide photo identification as a condition of casting a ballot in such elections, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Election Integrity Act”. SEC. 2. REQUIRING VOTERS TO PROVIDE PHOTO IDENTIFICATION. (a) Requirement To Provide Photo Identification As Condition Of Casting Ballot.— (1) IN GENERAL.—Title III of the Help America Vote Act of 2002 (52 U.S.C. 15481 et seq.) is amended by inserting after section 303 the following new section: “SEC. 303A. PHOTO IDENTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS. “(a) Provision Of Identification Required As Condition Of Casting Ballot.— “(1) INDIVIDUALS VOTING IN PERSON.— “(A) REQUIREMENT TO PROVIDE IDENTIFICATION.—Notwithstanding any other provision of law and except as provided in subparagraph (B), the appropriate State or local election official may not provide a ballot for an election for Federal office to an individual who desires to vote in person unless the individual presents to the official a valid photo identification. “(B) AVAILABILITY OF PROVISIONAL BALLOT.— “(i) IN GENERAL.—If an individual does not present the identification required under subparagraph (A), the individual shall be permitted to cast a provisional ballot with respect to the election under section 302(a), except that the appropriate State or local election official may not make a determination under section 302(a)(4) that the individual is eligible under State law to vote in the election unless, not later than 10 days after casting the provisional ballot, the individual presents to the official— “(I) the identification required under subparagraph (A); or “(II) an affidavit attesting that the individual does not possess the identification required under subparagraph (A) because the individual has a religious objection to being photographed. “(ii) NO EFFECT ON OTHER PROVISIONAL BALLOTING RULES.—Nothing in clause (i) may be construed to apply to the casting of a provisional ballot pursuant to section 302(a) or any State law for reasons other than the failure to present the identification required under subparagraph (A). “(2) INDIVIDUALS VOTING OTHER THAN IN PERSON.— “(A) IN GENERAL.—Notwithstanding any other provision of law and except as provided in subparagraph (B), the appropriate State or local election official may not accept any ballot for an election for Federal office provided by an individual who votes other than in person unless the individual submits with the ballot a copy of a valid photo identification. “(B) EXCEPTION FOR OVERSEAS MILITARY VOTERS.—Subparagraph (A) does not apply with respect to a ballot provided by an absent uniformed services voter who, by reason of active duty or service, is absent from the United States on the date of the election involved. In this subparagraph, the term ‘absent uniformed services voter’ has the meaning given such term in section 107(1) of the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act (52 U.S.C. 20310(1)), other than an individual described in section 107(1)(C) of such Act. “(b) Provision Of Identifications Without Charge To Individuals Unable To Pay Costs Of Obtaining Identification.—If an individual presents a State or local election official with an affidavit attesting that the individual is unable to pay the costs associated with obtaining a valid photo identification under this section, the official shall provide the individual with a valid photo identification under this subsection without charge to the individual. “(c) Valid Photo Identifications Described.—For purposes of this section, a ‘valid photo identification’ means, with respect to an individual who seeks to vote in a State, any of the following: “(1) A valid State-issued motor vehicle driver’s license that includes a photo of the individual and an expiration date. “(2) A valid State-issued identification card that includes a photo of the individual and an expiration date. “(3) A valid United States passport for the individual. “(4) A valid military identification for the individual. “(5) Any other form of government-issued identification that the State may specify as a valid photo identification for purposes of this subsection. “(d) Notification Of Identification Requirement To Applicants For Voter Registration.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—Each State shall ensure that, at the time an individual applies to register to vote in elections for Federal office in the State, the appropriate State or local election official notifies the individual of the photo identification requirements of this section. “(2) SPECIAL RULE FOR INDIVIDUALS APPLYING TO REGISTER TO VOTE ONLINE.—Each State shall ensure that, in the case of an individual who applies to register to vote in elections for Federal office in the State online, the online voter registration system notifies the individual of the photo identification requirements of this section before the individual completes the online registration process. “(e) Treatment Of States With Photo Identification Requirements In Effect As Of Date Of Enactment.—If, as of the date of the enactment of this section, a State has in effect a law requiring an individual to provide a photo identification as a condition of casting a ballot in elections for Federal office held in the State and the law remains in effect on and after the effective date of this section, the State shall be considered to meet the requirements of this section if— “(1) the State submits a request to the Attorney General and provides such information as the Attorney General may consider necessary to determine that the State has in effect such a law and that the law remains in effect; and “(2) the Attorney General approves the request. “(f) Effective Date.—This section shall apply with respect to elections for Federal office held in 2020 or any succeeding year.”. (2) CLERICAL AMENDMENT.—The table of contents of such Act is amended by inserting after the item relating to section 303 the following new item: “Sec. 303A. Photo identification requirements.”. (b) Conforming Amendment Relating To Voluntary Guidance By Election Assistance Commission.—Section 311(b) of such Act (52 U.S.C. 21101(b)) is amended— (1) by striking “and” at the end of paragraph (2); (2) by striking the period at the end of paragraph (3) and inserting “; and”; and (3) by adding at the end the following new paragraph: “(4) in the case of the recommendations with respect to section 303A, October 1, 2018.”. (c) Conforming Amendment Relating To Enforcement.—Section 401 of such Act (52 U.S.C. 21111) is amended by striking “and 303” and inserting “303, and 303A”. (d) Conforming Amendments Relating To Repeal Of Existing Photo Identification Requirements For Certain Voters.— (1) IN GENERAL.—Section 303 of such Act (42 U.S.C. 15483) is amended— (A) in the heading, by striking “AND REQUIREMENTS FOR VOTERS WHO REGISTER BY MAIL”; (B) in the heading of subsection (b), by striking “FOR VOTERS WHO REGISTER BY MAIL” and inserting “FOR MAIL-IN REGISTRATION FORMS”; (C) in subsection (b), by striking paragraphs (1) through (3) and redesignating paragraphs (4) and (5) as paragraphs (1) and (2), respectively; and (D) in subsection (c), by striking “subsections (a)(5)(A)(i)(II) and (b)(3)(B)(i)(II)” and inserting “subsection (a)(5)(A)(i)(II)”. (2) CLERICAL AMENDMENT.—The table of contents of such Act is amended by amending the item relating to section 303 to read as follows: “Sec. 303. Computerized statewide voter registration list requirements.”. (e) Effective Date.—This section and the amendments made by this section shall apply with respect to elections for Federal office held in 2020 or any succeeding year.
  9. PES: Provides funding for the United Mine Workers of America Pension Plan and requires Congressional approval for moratoriums on federal coal leasing IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES Senator Fitzgerald (On the behalf of the Vang Administration, with thanks to Mr. Manchin, Mrs. Capito, and Ms. Cheney) introduced the following bill; A BILL To amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to transfer certain funds to the 1974 United Mine Workers of America Pension Plan and to provide that an order by the Secretary of the Interior imposing a moratorium on Federal coal leasing shall not take effect unless a joint resolution of approval is enacted Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Miner Protection Act”. SEC. 2. TRANSFERS TO 1974 UMWA PENSION PLAN. (a) In General.—Subsection (i) of section 402 of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (30 U.S.C. 1232) is amended— (1) by redesignating paragraph (4) as paragraph (5); and (2) by inserting after paragraph (3) the following: “(4) ADDITIONAL AMOUNTS.— “(A) CALCULATION.—If the dollar limitation specified in paragraph (3)(A) exceeds the aggregate amount required to be transferred under paragraphs (1) and (2) for a fiscal year, the Secretary of the Treasury shall transfer an additional amount equal to the difference between such dollar limitation and such aggregate amount to the trustees of the 1974 UMWA Pension Plan to pay benefits required under that plan. “(B) CESSATION OF TRANSFERS.—The transfers described in subparagraph (A) shall cease as of the first fiscal year beginning after the first plan year for which the funded percentage (as defined in section 432(i)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986) of the 1974 UMWA Pension Plan is at least 100 percent, taking fully into account all outstanding liabilities for loans made pursuant to subparagraph (D). “(C) PROHIBITION ON BENEFIT INCREASES, ETC.—During a fiscal year in which the 1974 UMWA Pension Plan is receiving transfers under subparagraph (A), no amendment of such plan which increases the liabilities of the plan by reason of any increase in benefits, any change in the accrual of benefits, or any change in the rate at which benefits become nonforfeitable under the plan may be adopted unless the amendment is required as a condition of qualification under part I of subchapter D of chapter 1 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. “(D) TREATMENT OF TRANSFERS FOR PURPOSES OF WITHDRAWAL LIABILITY UNDER ERISA.—The amount of any transfer made under subparagraph (A) (and any earnings attributable thereto) shall be disregarded in determining the unfunded vested benefits of the 1974 UMWA Pension Plan and the allocation of such unfunded vested benefits to an employer for purposes of determining the employer’s withdrawal liability under section 4201 of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974. “(E) ADDITIONAL LOAN AUTHORITY.— “(i) IN GENERAL.—In addition to the amounts transferred under any provision other than this subparagraph, and without regard to the limitations described in paragraph (3), each year beginning with fiscal year 2018 the Secretary of the Treasury shall transfer to the 1974 UMWA Pension Plan as a loan the amount certified by the Trustees of the 1974 UMWA Pension Plan to be necessary to prevent the insolvency of such plan. “(ii) ANNUAL CAP.—The amount of each annual loan under clause (i) shall not exceed $600,000,000. “(iii) LOAN TERMS.— “(I) IN GENERAL.—Each such annual loan shall bear interest at the rate of 1 percent per annum, and each shall be treated as a separate loan. “(II) REPAYMENT.—For the first 10 years of each such loan, only the interest on such loan shall be repayable, and payments on the principal shall be distributed over the 30-year period beginning with the 11th year of the loan. “(III) ADDITIONAL PAYMENTS.—Notwithstanding subclauses (I) and (II), to the extent that the Trustees of the 1974 UMWA Pension Plan certify that such plan has surplus assets which are not needed to pay benefits under the plan or to ensure the future solvency of the plan, such surplus assets shall be applied towards the repayment of the oldest outstanding loan made pursuant to this subparagraph. “(IV) MAINTENANCE OF CERTAIN MEASURES UNDER REHABILITATION PLAN.—Each loan under this subparagraph shall specify as a condition of the loan that, if the 1974 UMWA Pension Plan emerges from critical status (within the meaning of section 432 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 and section 305 of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974), the Plan will continue to meet the requirements of section 432(b)(3) of such Code and 305(b)(3) of such Act, and the measures adopted pursuant to section 432(e)(3)(A)(ii) of such Code and section 305(e)(3)(A)(ii) of such Act will remain in place. During the period such measures are required to remain in place, sections 412(b)(3) of such Code and 302(b)(3) of such Act shall continue to apply as if the plan were still in critical status. “(iv) ANNUAL CERTIFICATION.—Each year beginning with fiscal year 2018, the Trustees of the 1974 UMWA Pension Plan shall certify the amount required to be loaned pursuant to clause (i) and the amount of any surplus assets described in clause (iii)(III). Such certification shall also include a certification that— “(I) such loan amount, in combination with future amounts available to the Plan, is projected to be sufficient to maintain indefinitely the solvency of the plan (without regard to any outstanding loan balance); and “(II) the Plan is projected to be able to repay the amount of such loan, with interest, as required under clause (iii). The preceding sentence shall not apply with respect to any year in which the amount determined by the Trustees under clause (i) is $0 and no loans under this subparagraph remain outstanding. “(v) PLAN INSOLVENCY OR DEFAULT.—If the 1974 UMWA Pension Plan becomes insolvent in any year despite receiving loan amounts under this subparagraph, or if the Plan is unable to make any payment on a loan under this subparagraph when due, employers contributing to the Plan and employer associations with members contributing to the Plan shall not be subject to any new or increased liability, including any increased fee, expense, contribution, assessment, or surcharge. “(vi) INSOLVENCY.—For purposes of this subparagraph, a plan is insolvent if the plan's available resources are not sufficient to pay benefits under the plan when due for the plan year and as projected indefinitely into future plan years, or if the plan is determined to be insolvent under section 418E(d) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. “(vii) INITIAL LOAN.—The first loan under this subparagraph shall be made not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of the American Miners Pension Act of 2017. “(F) ENHANCED ANNUAL REPORTING.— “(i) IN GENERAL.—Not later than the 90th day of each plan year beginning after the date of enactment of the American Miners Pension Act of 2017, the trustees of the 1974 UMWA Pension Plan shall file with the Secretary of the Treasury or the Secretary's delegate and the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation a report (including appropriate documentation and actuarial certifications from the plan actuary, as required by the Secretary of the Treasury or the Secretary's delegate) that contains— “(I) whether the plan is in endangered or critical status under section 305 of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 and section 432 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 as of the first day of such plan year; “(II) the funded percentage (as defined in section 432(i)(2) of such Code) as of the first day of such plan year, and the underlying actuarial value of assets and liabilities taken into account in determining such percentage; “(III) the market value of the assets of the plan as of the last day of the plan year preceding such plan year; “(IV) the total value of all contributions made during the plan year preceding such plan year; “(V) the total value of all benefits paid during the plan year preceding such plan year; “(VI) cash flow projections for such plan year and either the 6 or 10 succeeding plan years, at the election of the trustees, and the assumptions relied upon in making such projections; “(VII) funding standard account projections for such plan year and the 9 succeeding plan years, and the assumptions relied upon in making such projections; “(VIII) the total value of all investment gains or losses during the plan year preceding such plan year; “(IX) any significant reduction in the number of active participants during the plan year preceding such plan year, and the reason for such reduction; “(X) a list of employers that withdrew from the plan in the plan year preceding such plan year, and the resulting reduction in contributions; “(XI) a list of employers that paid withdrawal liability to the plan during the plan year preceding such plan year and, for each employer, a total assessment of the withdrawal liability paid, the annual payment amount, and the number of years remaining in the payment schedule with respect to such withdrawal liability; “(XII) any material changes to benefits, accrual rates, or contribution rates during the plan year preceding such plan year; “(XIII) any scheduled benefit increase or decrease in the plan year preceding such plan year having a material effect on liabilities of the plan; “(XIV) details regarding any funding improvement plan or rehabilitation plan and updates to such plan; “(XV) the number of participants and beneficiaries during the plan year preceding such plan year who are active participants, the number of participants and beneficiaries in pay status, and the number of terminated vested participants and beneficiaries; “(XVI) the information contained on the most recent annual funding notice submitted by the plan under section 101(f) of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974; “(XVII) the information contained on the most recent Department of Labor Form 5500 of the plan; and “(XVIII) copies of the plan document and amendments, other retirement benefit or ancillary benefit plans relating to the plan and contribution obligations under such plans, a breakdown of administrative expenses of the plan, participant census data and distribution of benefits, the most recent actuarial valuation report as of the plan year, copies of collective bargaining agreements, and financial reports, and such other information as the Secretary of the Treasury or the Secretary's delegate, in consultation with the Secretary of Labor and the Director of the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, may require. “(ii) ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION.—The report required under clause (i) shall be submitted electronically. “(iii) INFORMATION SHARING.—The Secretary of the Treasury or the Secretary's delegate shall share the information in the report under clause (i) with the Secretary of Labor. “(iv) PENALTY.—Any failure to file the report required under clause (i) on or before the date described in such clause shall be treated as a failure to file a report required to be filed under section 6058(a) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, except that section 6652(e) of such Code shall be applied with respect to any such failure by substituting ‘$100’ for ‘$25’. The preceding sentence shall not apply if the Secretary of the Treasury or the Secretary's delegate determines that reasonable diligence has been exercised by the trustees of such plan in attempting to timely file such report. “(G) 1974 UMWA PENSION PLAN DEFINED.—For purposes of this paragraph, the term ‘1974 UMWA Pension Plan’ has the meaning given the term in section 9701(a)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, but without regard to the limitation on participation to individuals who retired in 1976 and thereafter.”. (b) Coordination With Taxation Of Unrelated Business Income.—Subparagraph (A) of section 514(c)(6) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended— (1) by striking “or” at the end of clause (i); (2) by striking the period at the end of clause (ii)(II) and inserting “, or”; and (3) by adding at the end the following new clause: “(iii) indebtedness with respect to the 1974 UMWA Pension Plan (as defined in section 402(i)(4)(G) of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977) under a loan made by the Secretary pursuant to section 402(i)(4)(E) of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977.”. SEC. 3. CONGRESSIONAL APPROVAL FOR ORDER BY SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR IMPOSING A MORATORIUM ON FEDERAL COAL LEASING. An order by the Secretary of the Interior imposing a moratorium on Federal coal leasing shall have no force or effect unless— (1) the Secretary submits to Congress the proposed order; and (2) a joint resolution that approves the order is enacted within 30 legislative days after the proposed order is received by Congress. SEC. 4. Effective date. The bill shall go into effect upon its constitutional passage.
  10. PES: A bill to increase funding to the Department of Agriculture's Market Access Program and Foreign Market Development Program IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES Senator Fitzgerald (On behalf of the Vang Administration, Mr. Newhouse , Mr. Marshall, Mr. Thomas J. Rooney of Florida, Ms. Pingree, Mr. Panetta, and Mrs. Bustos) introduced the following bill; A BILL To amend the Agricultural Trade Act of 1978 to extend and expand the Market Access Program and the Foreign Market Development Program. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Expanding American Agricultural Trade and Exports Act” SEC. 2. FINDINGS. The Congress finds the following: (1) Between 1977 and 2014, the export promotion programs of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) have added $8.15 billion on average every year to the value of United States agricultural exports, equal to a total of $309.7 billion, or 15.3 percent, in additional export revenue. (2) Between 1977 and 2014, USDA export promotion programs have generated a net return of $28.30 for every dollar invested; and between 2002 and 2014, under a less than full employment scenario, the programs have annually added an average of 2.7 percent, or $8.4 billion, to farm cash receipts, and contributed up to 239,800 full and part-time jobs across the United States economy. (3) Between 2002 and 2014, USDA export promotion programs have added up to $39.3 billion in gross economic output and up to $16.9 billion in gross domestic product under a less than full employment scenario. (4) Communities across the United States, producing agricultural commodities as varied as apples, cotton, beef, soybeans, rice, wheat, dairy, corn, citrus, wine, pork, peanuts, cranberries, lentils, tree nuts, timber, poultry, potatoes, and seafood, have utilized USDA export promotion programs to increase their foreign market access. (5) Private sector contributions have helped maintain the public-private partnership between USDA and private agricultural groups as the effective available funds from USDA have declined, with private contributions representing approximately 70 percent of the funds available for export promotion in 2014. (6) Foreign competitors have expanded their own agricultural export promotion programs at a far faster rate than the United States, placing United States producers at a competitive disadvantage in international markets. (7) The economic impact of USDA export promotion programs has eroded in recent years, as funding for the Market Access Program has remained static since 2006, and funding for the Foreign Market Development Program has remained static since 2002, while inflation has increased. (8) A recent academic analysis found that doubling public funding for the Market Access Program and the Foreign Market Development Program, coupled with increasing private contributions ranging from 10 to 50 percent, would result in average annual gains in agricultural exports from $3.4 to $4.5 billion, and would result in average annual gains in gross domestic product from $4.5 to $6.0 billion under a less than full employment scenario. SEC. 3. MARKET ACCESS PROGRAM. Section 211(c)(1)(A) of the Agricultural Trade Act of 1978 (7 U.S.C. 5641(c)(1)(A)) is amended by striking “not more than” and all that follows through “through 2018” and inserting “not more than $2,000,000,000 for fiscal year 2021, $2,400,000,000 for fiscal year 2022, $2,800,000,000 for fiscal year 2023, $3,200,000,000 for fiscal year 2024, $3,600,000,000 for fiscal year 2025, and $4,000,000,000 for fiscal year 2026”. SEC. 4. FOREIGN MARKET DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. Section 703(a) of the Agricultural Trade Act of 1978 (7 U.S.C. 5723(a)) is amended by striking “$34,500,000 for each of fiscal years 2008 through 2018” and inserting “$3,450,000,000 for fiscal year 2021, $4,140,000,000 for fiscal year 2022, $4,830,000,000 for fiscal year 2023, $5,520,000,000 for fiscal year 2024, $6,210,000,000 for fiscal year 2025, and $6,900,000,000 for fiscal year 2026”.
×
×
  • Create New...