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TexAgRepublican

CH Republicans
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  1. TexAgRepublican

    American National Security Act

    Mr. Swanner, on behalf of President Macmillan and with thanks to Mr. McCaul and Mr. Hurd, submits A BILL To protect the United States and its people from threats to its safety. SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. (a) This act shall be cited as the American National Security Act. SEC. 2. CONSTRUCTION OF PHYSICAL BARRIER ALONG U.S.-MEXICO BORDER. (a) A physical precast concrete wall no less than 30 feet high and extending no less than 10 feet underground shall be constructed along no less than 1,000 miles of the U.S.-Mexico border by December 31, 2020. (b) $12,000,000,000 is appropriated for this section. SEC. 3. IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT SURGE. (a) The Department of Homeland Security shall be authorized to enter into a written agreement with a state or a subdivision thereof pursuant to which a state or local officer or employee may carry out immigration-related investigations, apprehensions, or detentions of aliens in the United States at state or local expense. SEC. 4. REVIEW OF ALIENS TO IDENTIFY SECURITY THREATS TO THE UNITED STATES. (a) In this section, the term “covered alien” is defined as any alien applying for admission to the United States who is a national or resident of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Yemen, or any other nation the Secretary of Homeland Security determines to be heavily compromised by terrorism, or who has no nationality and whose last habitual residence was from any of the aforementioned nations or any other nation the Secretary of Homeland Security determines to be heavily compromised by terrorism. (b) In addition to the screening conducted by the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation shall take all actions necessary to ensure that each covered alien receives a thorough background investigation prior to admission. A covered alien may not be admitted until the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation certifies to the Secretary of Homeland Security and the Director of National Intelligence that each covered alien has received a background investigation that is sufficient to determine whether the covered alien is a threat to the security of the United States. (c) A covered alien may only be admitted to the United States after the Secretary of Homeland Security, with the unanimous concurrence of the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Director of National Intelligence, certifies that the covered alien is not a threat to the security of the United States. (d) The Inspector General of the Department of Homeland Security shall conduct a risk-based review of all certifications made under subsection (c) each year. SEC. 5. OPEN-SOURCE SCREENING SOFTWARE. (a) The Secretary of Homeland Security shall (1) develop an open-source software based on U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s global travel targeting and analysis systems and the Department of State’s watchlisting, identification, and screening systems in order to facilitate the vetting of travelers against terrorist watchlists and law enforcement databases, enhance border management, and improve targeting and analysis; and (2) may make such software and any related technical assistance or training available to foreign governments or multilateral organizations for such purposes, provided that the Secretary of Homeland Security and the Director of National Intelligence concurrently certify that such availability is in the national security interests of the United States. (b) The authority provided under this section shall be exercised in accordance with applicable provisions of the Arms Export Control Act, the Export Administration Regulations, or any other similar provision of law. SEC. 6. PREVENTING TAX CREDIT FRAUD. (a) Claimants of the Earned Income Tax Credit and the Child Tax Credit must have a social security number that is valid for employment. SEC. 7. ENACTMENT. (a) This act shall take effect immediately.
  2. TexAgRepublican

    North Korea

    http://teddervision.com/forums/topic/5784-draft-resolution-on-north-korea/
  3. TexAgRepublican

    Draft Resolution on North Korea

    The Security Council, Recalling its previous relevant resolutions, including resolution 825 (1993), resolution 1540 (2004), resolution 1695 (2006), resolution 1718 (2006), resolution 1874 (2009), resolution 1887 (2009), resolution 2087 (2013), resolution 2094 (2013), resolution 2270 (2016), resolution 2321 (2016), as well as the statements of its President of 6 October 2006 (S/PRST/2006/41), 13 April 2009 (S/PRST/2009/7) and 16 April 2012 (S/PRST/2012/13), Reaffirming that proliferation of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons, as well as their means of delivery, constitutes a threat to international peace and security, Expressing its gravest concern at the ballistic missile tests by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea in violation of resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), and at the challenge such tests constitute to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (“the NPT”) and to international efforts aimed at strengthening the global regime of non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, and the danger they pose to peace and stability in the region and beyond, Underlining once again the importance that the DPRK respond to other security and humanitarian concerns of the international community, Underlining also that measures imposed by this resolution are not intended to have adverse humanitarian consequences for the civilian population of the DPRK, Expressing serious concern that the DPRK has continued to violate relevant Security Council resolutions through repeated launches and attempted launches of ballistic missiles, and noting that all such ballistic missile activities contribute to the DPRK’s development of nuclear weapons delivery systems and increase tension in the region and beyond, Expressing continued concern that the DPRK is abusing the privileges and immunities accorded under the Vienna Conventions on Diplomatic and Consular Relations, Expressing great concern that the DPRK’s prohibited arms sales have generated revenues that are diverted to the pursuit of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles while DPRK citizens have unmet needs, Expressing its gravest concern that the DPRK’s ongoing nuclear- and ballistic missile-related activities have further generated increased tension in the region and beyond, and determining that there continues to exist a clear threat to international peace and security, Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations, and taking measures under its Article 41, 1. Condemns in the strongest terms the ballistic missile launches conducted by the DPRK which used ballistic missile technology in violation and flagrant disregard of the Security Council’s resolutions; 2. Reaffirms its decisions that the DPRK shall not conduct any further launches that use ballistic missile technology, nuclear tests, or any other provocation; shall suspend all activities related to its ballistic missile program and in this context re-establish its pre-existing commitments to a moratorium on missile launches; shall abandon all nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programs in a complete, verifiable and irreversible manner, and immediately cease all related activities; and shall abandon any other existing weapons of mass destruction and ballistic missile programs in a complete, verifiable and irreversible manner; Designations 3. Decides that the measures specified in paragraph 8 (d) of resolution 1718 (2006) shall apply also to the individuals and entities listed in Annex I and II of this resolution and to any individuals or entities acting on their behalf or at their direction, and to entities owned or controlled by them, including through illicit means, and decides further that the measures specified in paragraph 8 (e) of resolution 1718 (2006) shall also apply to the individuals listed in Annex I of this resolution and to individuals acting on their behalf or at their direction; 4. Decides to adjust the measures imposed by paragraph 8 of resolution 1718 (2006) and this resolution through the designation of additional goods, directs the Committee to undertake its tasks to this effect and to report to the Security Council within fifteen days of adoption of this resolution, and further decides that, if the Committee has not acted, then the Security Council will complete action to adjust the measures within seven days of receiving that report; 5. Decides to adjust the measures imposed by paragraph 7 of resolution 2321 (2016) through the designation of additional conventional arms-related items, materials, equipment, goods, and technology, directs the Committee to undertake its tasks to this effect and to report to the Security Council within thirty days of adoption of this resolution, further decides that, if the Committee has not acted, then the Security Council will complete action to adjust the measures within seven days of receiving that report, and directs the Committee to update this list every 12 months; Transportation 6. Decides that the Committee may designate vessels for which it has information indicating they are, or have been, related to activities prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), 2356 (2017), or this resolution and all Member States shall prohibit the entry into their ports of such designated vessels, unless entry is required in the case of emergency or in the case of return to its port of origination, or unless the Committee determines in advance that such entry is required for humanitarian purposes or any other purposes consistent with the objectives of resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), or this resolution; 7. Clarifies that the measures set forth in paragraph 20 of resolution 2270 (2016) and paragraph 9 of resolution 2321 (2016), requiring States to prohibit their nationals, persons subject to their jurisdiction and entities incorporated in their territory or subject to their jurisdiction from owning, leasing, operating any vessel flagged by the DPRK, without exception, unless the Committee approves on a case-by-case basis in advance, apply to chartering vessels flagged by the DPRK; Sectoral 8. Decides that paragraph 26 of resolution 2321 (2016) shall be replaced by the following: “Decides that the DPRK shall not supply, sell or transfer, directly or indirectly, from its territory or by its nationals or using its flag vessels or aircraft, coal, iron, and iron ore, and that all States shall prohibit the procurement of such material from the DPRK by their nationals, or using their flag vessels or aircraft, and whether or not originating in the territory of the DPRK, decides that for sales and transactions of iron and iron ore for which written contracts have been finalized prior to the adoption of this resolution, all States may allow those shipments to be imported into their territories up to 30 days from the date of adoption of this resolution with notification provided to the Committee containing details on those imports by no later than 45 days after the date of adoption of this resolution, and decides further that this provision shall not apply with respect to coal that the exporting State confirms on the basis of credible information has originated outside the DPRK and was transported through the DPRK solely for export from the Port of Rajin (Rason), provided that the exporting State notifies the Committee in advance and such transactions involving coal originating outside of the DPRK are unrelated to generating revenue for the DPRK’s nuclear or ballistic missile programs or other activities prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), or this resolution;” 9. Decides that the DPRK shall not supply, sell or transfer, directly or indirectly, from its territory or by its nationals or using its flag vessels or aircraft, seafood (including fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other aquatic invertebrates in all forms), and that all States shall prohibit the procurement of such items from the DPRK by their nationals, or using their flag vessels or aircraft, whether or not originating in the territory of the DPRK, and further decides that for sales and transactions of seafood (including fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other aquatic invertebrates in all forms) for which written contracts have been finalized prior to the adoption of this resolution, all States may allow those shipments to be imported into their territories up to 30 days from the date of adoption of this resolution with notification provided to the Committee containing details on those imports by no later than 45 days after the date of adoption of this resolution; 10. Decides that the DPRK shall not supply, sell or transfer, directly or indirectly, from its territory or by its nationals or using its flag vessels or aircraft, lead and lead ore, and that all States shall prohibit the procurement of such items from the DPRK by their nationals, or using their flag vessels or aircraft, whether or not originating in the territory of the DPRK, and further decides that for sales and transactions of lead and lead ore for which written contracts have been finalized prior to the adoption of this resolution, all States may allow those shipments to be imported into their territories up to 30 days from the date of adoption of this resolution with notification provided to the Committee containing details on those imports by no later than 45 days after the date of adoption of this resolution; 11. Decides that all Member States shall prohibit the direct or indirect supply, sale or transfer to the DPRK, through their territories or by their nationals, or using their flag vessels or aircraft, and whether or not originating in their territories, of all condensates and natural gas liquids, and decides that the DPRK shall not procure such materials; 12. Decides that all Member States shall not supply, sell, or transfer to the DPRK in any period of twelve months after the date of adoption of this resolution an amount of crude oil that is in excess of the amount that the Member State supplied, sold or transferred in the period of twelve months prior to adoption of this resolution, unless the Committee approves in advance on a case-by-case basis a shipment of crude oil is exclusively for livelihood purposes of DPRK nationals and unrelated to the DPRK’s nuclear or ballistic missile programmes or other activities prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), or this resolution; 13. Decides that the DPRK shall not supply, sell or transfer, directly or indirectly, from its territory or by its nationals or using its flag vessels or aircraft, textiles (including but not limited to fabrics and partially or fully completed apparel products), and that all States shall prohibit the procurement of such items from the DPRK by their nationals, or using their flag vessels or aircraft, whether or not originating in the territory of the DPRK, unless the Committee approves on a case-by-case basis in advance, and further decides that for such sales, supplies, and transfers of textiles (including but not limited to fabrics and partially or fully completed apparel products) for which written contracts have been finalized prior to the adoption of this resolution, all States may allow those shipments to be imported into their territories up to 90 days from the date of adoption of this resolution with notification provided to the Committee containing details on those imports by no later than 135 days after the date of adoption of this resolution; 14. Decides that all Member States shall not provide work authorizations for DPRK nationals in their jurisdictions in connection with admission to their territories unless the Committee determines on a case-by-case basis in advance that employment of DPRK nationals in a member state’s jurisdiction is required for the delivery of humanitarian assistance, denuclearization or any other purpose consistent with the objectives of resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), or this resolution, and decides that this provision shall not apply with respect to work authorizations for which written contracts have been finalized prior to the adoption of this resolution; 15. Decides that the DPRK shall not supply, sell or transfer, directly or indirectly, from its territory or by its nationals or using its flag vessels or aircraft, food and agricultural products (HS codes 12, 08, 07), machinery (HS code 84), electrical equipment (HS code 85), earth and stone including magnesite and magnesia (HS code 25), wood (HS code 44), and vessels (HS code 89), and that all States shall prohibit the procurement of the above-mentioned commodities and products from the DPRK by their nationals, or using their flag vessels or aircraft, whether or not originating in the territory of the DPRK, and further decides that for sales of and transactions involving all commodities and products from the DPRK whose transfer, supply, or sale by the DPRK are prohibited by this paragraph and for which written contracts have been finalized prior to the adoption of this resolution, all States may only allow those shipments to be imported into their territories up to 30 days from the date of adoption of this resolution with notification provided to the Committee containing details on those imports by no later than 45 days after the date of adoption of this resolution; 16. Decides that all Member States shall prohibit the direct or indirect supply, sale or transfer to the DPRK, through their territories or by their nationals, or using their flag vessels, aircraft, pipelines, rail lines, or vehicles and whether or not originating in their territories, of all industrial machinery (HS codes 84 and 85), transportation vehicles (HS codes 86 through 89), and iron, steel, and other metals (HS codes 72 through 83) and further decides that this provision shall not apply with respect to the provision of spare parts needed to maintain the safe operation of DPRK commercial civilian passenger aircraft (currently consisting of the following aircraft models and types: An-24R/RV, An-148-100B, Il-18D, Il-62M, Tu-134B-3, Tu-154B, Tu-204-100B, and Tu-204-300); 17. Decides that all Member States shall prohibit the direct or indirect supply, sale or transfer to the DPRK, through their territories or by their nationals, or using their flag vessels, aircraft, pipelines, rail lines, or vehicles and whether or not originating in their territories, of all crude oil, unless the Committee approves in advance on a case-by-case basis a shipment of crude oil which is exclusively for livelihood purposes of DPRK nationals and unrelated to the DPRK’s nuclear or ballistic missile programmes or other activities prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), 2356 (2017), or this resolution, further decides that this prohibition shall not apply with respect to crude oil that, for a period of twelve months after the date of adoption of this resolution, and for twelve months periods thereafter, does not exceed 4 million barrels or 525,000 tons in the aggregate per twelve month period, and decides that all Member States providing crude oil shall provide a report to the Committee every 90 days from the date of adoption of this resolution of the amount of crude oil provided to the DPRK; 18. Expresses concern that DPRK nationals frequently work in other States for the purpose of generating foreign export earnings that the DPRK uses to support its prohibited nuclear and ballistic missile programs, decides that all Member States shall not exceed on any date after the date of adoption of this resolution the total number of work authorizations for DPRK nationals provided in their jurisdictions at the time of the adoption of this resolution unless the Committee approves on a case-by-case basis in advance that employment of additional DPRK nationals beyond the number of work authorizations provided in a member state’s jurisdiction at the time of the adoption of this resolution is required for the delivery of humanitarian assistance, denuclearization or any other purpose consistent with the objectives of resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), or this resolution; Financial 19. Decides that States shall prohibit, by their nationals or in their territories, the opening of new joint ventures or cooperative entities with DPRK entities or individuals, or the expansion of existing joint ventures through additional investments, whether or not acting for or on behalf of the government of the DPRK, unless such joint ventures or cooperative entities have been approved by the Committee in advance on a case-by-case basis; 20. Clarifies that the prohibitions contained in paragraph 11 of resolution 2094 (2013) apply to clearing of funds through all Member States’ territories; 21. Clarifies that companies performing financial services commensurate with those provided by banks are considered financial institutions for the purposes of implementing paragraph 11 of resolution 2094 (2013), paragraphs 33 and 34 of resolution 2270 (2016), and paragraph 33 of resolution 2321 (2016); Chemical Weapons 22. Recalls paragraph 24 of resolution 2270 (2016), decides that the DPRK shall not deploy or use chemical weapons, and urgently calls upon the DPRK to accede to the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and Their Destruction, and then to immediately comply with its provisions; Vienna Convention 23. Demands that the DPRK fully comply with its obligations under the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations and the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations; Impact on the People of the DPRK 24. Regrets the DPRK’s massive diversion of its scarce resources toward its development of nuclear weapons and a number of expensive ballistic missile programs, notes the findings of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Assistance that well over half of the people in the DPRK suffer from major insecurities in food and medical care, including a very large number of pregnant and lactating women and under-five children who are at risk of malnutrition and nearly a quarter of its total population suffering from chronic malnutrition, and, in this context, expresses deep concern at the grave hardship to which the people in the DPRK are subjected; Sanctions Implementation 25. Decides that Member States shall report to the Security Council within ninety days of the adoption of this resolution, and thereafter upon request by the Committee, on concrete measures they have taken in order to implement effectively the provisions of this resolution, requests the Panel of Experts, in cooperation with other United Nations sanctions monitoring groups, to continue its efforts to assist Member States in preparing and submitting such reports in a timely manner; 26. Calls upon all Member States to redouble efforts to implement in full the measures in resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), and to cooperate with each other in doing so, particularly with respect to inspecting, detecting and seizing items the transfer of which is prohibited by these resolutions; 27. Decides that the mandate of the Committee, as set out in paragraph 12 of resolution 1718 (2006), shall apply with respect to the measures imposed in this resolution and further decides that the mandate of the Panel of Experts, as specified in paragraph 26 of resolution 1874 (2009) and modified in paragraph 1 of resolution 2345 (2017), shall also apply with respect to the measures imposed in this resolution; 28. Decides to authorize all Member States to, and that all Member States shall, seize and dispose (such as through destruction, rendering inoperable or unusable, storage, or transferring to a State other than the originating or destination States for disposal) of items the supply, sale, transfer, or export of which is prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), or this resolution that are identified in inspections, in a manner that is not inconsistent with their obligations under applicable Security Council resolutions, including resolution 1540 (2004), as well as any obligations of parties to the NPT, the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Development of 29 April 1997, and the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on Their Destruction of 10 April 1972; 29. Emphasizes the importance of all States, including the DPRK, taking the necessary measures to ensure that no claim shall lie at the instance of the DPRK, or of any person or entity in the DPRK, or of persons or entities designated for measures set forth in resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), or this resolution, or any person claiming through or for the benefit of any such person or entity, in connection with any contract or other transaction where its performance was prevented by reason of the measures imposed by this resolution or previous resolutions; 30. Requests that Interpol issue Special Notices with respect to designated individuals, and directs the Committee to work with Interpol to develop the appropriate arrangements to do so; 31. Requests the Secretary-General to provide additional analytical resources needed to the Panel of Experts established pursuant to resolution 1874 (2009) to strengthen its ability to analyze the DPRK’s sanctions violation and evasion activities; Political 32. Reiterates its deep concern at the grave hardship that the people in the DPRK are subjected to, condemns the DPRK for pursuing nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles instead of the welfare of its people while people in the DPRK have great unmet needs, and emphasizes the necessity of the DPRK respecting and ensuring the welfare and inherent dignity of people in the DPRK; 33. Reaffirms that the measures imposed by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), and this resolution are not intended to have adverse humanitarian consequences for the civilian population of the DPRK or to affect negatively or restrict those activities, including economic activities and cooperation, food aid and humanitarian assistance, that are not prohibited by resolutions 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009), 2087 (2013), 2094 (2013), 2270 (2016), 2321 (2016), and this resolution, and the work of international and non-governmental organizations carrying out assistance and relief activities in the DPRK for the benefit of the civilian population of the DPRK and decides that the Committee may, on a case-by-case basis, exempt any activity from the measures imposed by these resolutions if the committee determines that such an exemption is necessary to facilitate the work of such organizations in the DPRK or for any other purpose consistent with the objectives of these resolutions, and further decides that the measures specified in paragraph 8 (d) of resolution 1718 (2006) shall not apply with respect to financial transactions with the DPRK Foreign Trade Bank or the Korea National Insurance Corporation if such transactions are solely for the operation of diplomatic or consular missions in the DPRK or humanitarian assistance activities that are undertaken by, or in coordination with, the United Nations; 34. Reaffirms its support for the Six Party Talks, calls for their resumption, and reiterates its support for the commitments set forth in the Joint Statement of 19 September 2005 issued by China, the DPRK, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, and the United States, including that the goal of the Six-Party Talks is the verifiable denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula in a peaceful manner, that the United States and the DPRK undertook to respect each other’s sovereignty and exist peacefully together, that the Six Parties undertook to promote economic cooperation, and all other relevant commitments; 35. Reiterates the importance of maintaining peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula and in north-east Asia at large, and expresses its commitment to a peaceful, diplomatic, and political solution to the situation and welcomes efforts by the Council members as well as other States to facilitate a peaceful and comprehensive solution through dialogue and stresses the importance of working to reduce tensions in the Korean Peninsula and beyond; 36. Affirms that it shall keep the DPRK’s actions under continuous review and is prepared to strengthen, modify, suspend or lift the measures as may be needed in light of the DPRK’s compliance, and, in this regard, expresses its determination to take further significant measures in the event of a further DPRK nuclear test or launch; 37. Decides to remain seized of the matter. Annex I Travel Ban/Asset Freeze (Individuals) 1. CHO IL U a. Description: Director of the Fifth Bureau of the Reconnaissance General Bureau. Cho is believed to be in charge of overseas espionage operations and foreign intelligence collection for the DPRK. b. AKA: Cho Il Woo c. Identifiers: DOB: May 10, 1945; POB: Musan, North Hamgyo’ng Province, DPRK; nationality: DPRK; Passport Number 736410010 2. CHO YON CHUN a. Description: Vice Director of the Organization and Guidance Department, which directs key personnel appointments for the Workers’ Party of Korea and the DPRK’s military. b. AKA: Jo Yon Jun c. Identifiers: DOB: September 28, 1937; Nationality: DPRK 3. CHOE HWI a. Description: First Vice Director of the Workers’ Party of Korea Propaganda and Agitation Department, which controls all DPRK media and is used by the government to control the public. b. A.K.A.: n/a c. Identifiers: YOB: 1954 or 1955, Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male; Address: DPRK 4. JO YONG-WON a. Description: Vice Director of the Worker’s Party of Korea’s Organization and Guidance Department, which directs key personnel appointments for the Workers’ Party of Korea and the DPRK’s military. b. A.K.A.: Cho Yongwon c. Identifiers: DOB: October 24, 1957; Nationality: DPRK; Gender, male; Address: DPRK 5. KIM CHOL NAM a. Description: President of Korea Kumsan Trading Corporation, a company that procures supplies for General Bureau of Atomic Energy and serves as a cash route to the DPRK. b. A.K.A.: n/a c. Identifiers: DOB: February 19, 1970; Nationality: DPRK; Passport no.: 563120238; Address: DPRK 6. KIM KYONG OK a. Description: Vice Director of the Organization and Guidance Department, which directs key personnel appointments for the Workers’ Party of Korea and the DPRK’s military. b. AKA: Kim Kyong Ok c. Identifiers: YOB: 1937 or 1938; Nationality: DPRK; Address: Pyongyang, DPRK 7. KIM TONG-HO a. Description: Vietnam Representative for Tanchon Commercial Bank, which is the main DPRK financial entity for weapons and missile-related sales. b. A.K.A.: n/a c. Identifiers: DOB: August 18, 1969; Nationality: DPRK; Passport no.: 745310111; Gender: male; Address: Vietnam 8. MIN BYONG CHOL a. Description: Member of the Worker’s Party of Korea’s Organization and Guidance Department, which directs key personnel appointments for the Workers’ Party of Korea and the DPRK’s military. b. A.K.A.: Min Pyo’ng-ch’o’l, Min Byong-chol, Min Byong Chun c. Identifiers: DOB: August 10, 1948; Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male; Address: DPRK 9. PAEK SE BONG a. Description: Paek Se Bong is a former Chairman of the Second Economic Committee, a former member of the National Defense Commission, and a former Vice Director of Munitions Industry Department (MID). b. AKA: n/a c. Identifiers: DOB: 21 March 1938; Nationality: DPRK 10. PAK HAN SE a. Description: Vice Chairman of the Second Economic Committee, which oversees the production of the DPRK’s ballistic missiles and directs the activities of Korea Mining Development Corporation, the DPRK’s premier arms dealer and main exporter of goods and equipment related to ballistic missiles and conventional weapons. b. A.K.A.: Kang Myong Chol c. Identifiers: Nationality: DPRK; Passport no.: 290410121; Address: DPRK 11. PAK TO CHUN a. Description: Pak To Chun is a former Secretary of Munitions Industry Department (MID) and currently advises on affairs relating to nuclear and missile programmes. He is a former State Affairs Commission member and is a member Workers’ Party of Korea Political Bureau. b. AKA: Pak Do Chun c. Identifiers: DOB: 9 March 1944; Nationality: DPRK 12. RI JAE IL a. Description: Vice Director of the Workers’ Party of Korea Propaganda and Agitation Department, which controls all DPRK’s media and is used by the government to control the public. b. AKA: RI, Chae-Il c. Identifiers: YOB 1934; Nationality: DPRK 13. RI SU YONG a. Description: Official for Korea Ryonbong General Corporation, specializes in acquisition for DPRK’s defence industries and support to Pyongyang’s military-related sales. Its procurements also probably support the DPRK’s chemical weapons programme. b. A.K.A.: n/a c. Identifiers: DOB: June 25, 1968; Nationality: DPRK; Passport no.: 654310175; Gender: male; Address: Cuba 14. RI YONG MU a. Description: Ri Yong Mu is a Vice Chairman of the State Affairs Commission, which directs and guides all DPRK’s military, defence, and security-related affairs, including acquisition and procurement. b. AKA: n/a c. Identifiers: DOB: 25 January 1925; Nationality: DPRK 15. CHOE CHUN YONG a. Description: Representative for Ilsim International Bank, which is affiliated with the DPRK military and has a close relationship with the Korea Kwangson Banking Corporation. Ilsim International Bank has attempted to evade United Nations sanctions. b. A.K.A.: Ch’oe Ch’un-yo’ng c. Identifiers: Nationality: DPRK; Passport no.: 654410078; Gender: male 16. HAN JANG SU a. Description: Chief Representative of the Foreign Trade Bank. b. A.K.A.: Chang-Su Han c. Identifiers: DOB: November 08, 1969; POB: Pyongyang, DPRK; Nationality: DPRK; Passport no.: 745420176, expires on October 19, 2020; Gender: male 17. JANG SONG CHOL a. Description: Jang Song Chol is a Korea Mining Development Corporation (KOMID) representative overseas. b. AKA: n/a c. Identifiers: DOB: 12 March 1967; Nationality: DPRK 18. JANG SUNG NAM a. Description: Chief of an overseas Tangun Trading Corporation branch, which is primarily responsible for the procurement of commodities and technologies to support the DPRK’s defense research and development programs. b. A.K.A.: n/a c. Identifiers: DOB: July 14, 1970; Nationality: DPRK; Passport no.: 563120368, issued on March 22, 2013; Passport expiration date: March 22, 2018; Gender: male 19. JO CHOL SONG a. Description: Deputy Representative for the Korea Kwangson Banking Corporation, which provides financial services in support to Tanchon Commercial Bank and Korea Hyoksin Trading, a subordinate entity of Korea Ryonbong General Corporation. b. A.K.A.: Cho Ch’o’l-so’ng c. Identifiers: DOB: September 25, 1984; Nationality: DPRK; Passport no.: 654320502, expires on September 16, 2019; Gender: male 21. KANG CHOL SU a. Description: Official for Korea Ryonbong General Corporation, which specializes in acquisition for the DPRK’s defense industries and support for the DPRK’s military-related overseas sales. Its procurements also likely support the DPRK’s chemical weapons program. b. A.K.A.: n/a c. Identifiers: DOB: February 13, 1969; Nationality: DPRK; Passport no.: 472234895 22. KIM MUN CHOL a. Description: Representative for Korea United Development Bank. b. A.K.A.: Kim Mun-ch’o’l c. Identifiers: DOB: March 25, 1957; Nationality: DPRK 23. KIM NAM UNG a. Description: Representative for Ilsim International Bank, which is affiliated with the DPRK military and has a close relationship with the Korea Kwangson Banking Corporation. Ilsim International Bank has attempted to evade United Nations sanctions. b. A.K.A.: n/a c. Identifiers: Nationality: DPRK; Passport no.: 654110043 24. PAK IL KYU a. Description: Official for Korea Ryonbong General Corporation, which specializes in acquisition for DPRK’s defense industries and support to Pyongyang’s military-related sales. Its procurements also likely support the DPRK’s chemical weapons program. b. A.K.A.: Pak Il-Gyu c. Identifiers: Nationality: DPRK; Passport no.: 563120235; Gender: male 25. PAK YONG SIK a. Description: Pak Yong Sik is a member of the Workers’ Party of Korea Central Military Commission, which is responsible for the development and implementation of the Workers’ Party of Korea military policies, commands and controls the DPRK’s military, and helps direct the country’s military defense industries. b. AKA: n/a c. Identifiers: YOB: 1950; Nationality: DPRK 26. CH’OE SO’K MIN a. Description: Ch’oe So’k-min is an overseas Foreign Trade Bank representative. In 2016, Ch’oe So’k-min was the deputy representative at the Foreign Trade Bank branch office in that overseas location. He has been associated with cash transfers from that overseas Foreign Trade Bank office to banks affiliated with North Korean special organizations and Reconnaissance General Bureau operatives located overseas in an effort to evade sanctions. b. AKA: n/a c. Identifiers: DOB: 25 July 1978; Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male 27. CHU HYO’K a. Description: Chu Hyo’k is a North Korean national who is an overseas Foreign Trade Bank representative. b. AKA: Ju Hyok c. Identifiers: DOB: 23 November 1986; Passport No. 836420186 issued 28 October 2016 expires 28 October 2021; Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male 28. KIM JONG SIK a. Description: A leading official guiding the DPRK’s WMD development efforts. Serving as Deputy Director of the Workers’ Party of Korea Munitions Industry Department. b. A.K.A.: Kim Cho’ng-sik c. Identifiers: YOB: between 1967 and 1969; Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male; Address: DPRK 29. KIM KYONG IL a. Description: Kim Kyong Il is a Foreign Trade Bank deputy chief representative in Libya. b. AKA: Kim Kyo’ng-il c. Identifiers: Location Libya; DOB: 01 August 1979; Passport No. 836210029; Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male 30. KIM TONG CHOL a. Description: Kim Tong Chol is an overseas Foreign Trade Bank representative. b. AKA: Kim Tong-ch’o’l c. Identifiers: DOB: 28 January 1966; Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male 31. KO CHOL MAN a. Description: Ko Chol Man is an overseas Foreign Trade Bank representative. b. AKA: Ko Ch’o’l-man c. Identifiers: DOB: 30 September 1967; Passport No. 472420180; Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male 32. KU JA HYONG a. Description: Ku Ja Hyong is a Foreign Trade Bank chief representative in Libya. b. AKA: Ku Cha-hyo’ng c. Identifiers: Location Libya; DOB: 08 September 1957; Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male 33. MUN KYONG HWAN a. Description: Mun Kyong Hwan is an overseas Bank of East Land representative. b. AKA: Mun Kyo’ng-hwan c. Identifiers: DOB: 22 August 1967; Passport No. 381120660 expires 25 March 2016; Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male 34. PAE WON UK a. Description: Pae Won Uk is an overseas Daesong Bank representative. b. AKA: Pae Wo’n-uk c. Identifiers: DOB: 22 August 1969; Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male; Passport No. 472120208 expires 22 Feb 2017 35. PAK BONG NAM a. Description: Pak Bong Nam is an overseas Ilsim International Bank representative. b. AKA: Lui Wai Ming; Pak Pong Nam; Pak Pong-nam c. Identifiers: DOB: 06 May 1969; Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male d. Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male 36 PAK MUN IL a. Description: Pak Mun Il is an overseas official of Korea Daesong Bank. b. AKA: Pak Mun-il c. Identifiers: DOB 01 January 1965; Passport No. 563335509 expires 27 August 2018; Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male 37. RI CHUN HWAN a. Description: Ri Chun Hwan is an overseas Foreign Trade Bank representative. b. AKA: Ri Ch’un-hwan c. Identifiers: DOB 21 August 1957; Passport No. 563233049 expires 09 May 2018; Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male 38. RI CHUN SONG a. Description: Ri Chun Song is an overseas Foreign Trade Bank representative. b. AKA: Ri Ch’un-so’ng c. Identifiers: DOB: 30 October 1965; Passport No. 654133553 expires 11 March 2019; Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male 39. RI PYONG CHUL a. Description: Alternate Member of the Political Bureau of the Workers’ Party of Korea and First Vice Director of the Munitions Industry Department. b. A.K.A.: Ri Pyo’ng-ch’o’l c. Identifiers: YOB: 1948; Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male; Address: DPRK 40. RI SONG HYOK a. Description: Ri Song Hyok is an overseas representative for Koryo Bank and Koryo Credit Development Bank and has reportedly established front companies to procure items and conduct financial transactions on behalf of North Korea. b. AKA: Li Cheng He c. Identifiers: DOB: 19 March 1965; Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male 41. RI U’N SO’NG a. Description: Ri U’n-so’ng is an overseas Korea Unification Development Bank representative. b. AKA: Ri Eun Song; Ri Un Song c. Identifiers: DOB: 23 July 1969; Nationality: DPRK; Gender: male Annex II Asset Freeze (Entities) 1. KANGBONG TRADING CORPORATION a. Description: The Kangbong Trading Corporation sold, supplied, transferred, or purchased, directly or indirectly, to or from the DPRK, metal, graphite, coal, or software, where revenue or goods received may benefit the Government of the DPRK or the Workers’ Party of Korea. The Kangbong Trading Corporation’s parent is the Ministry of People’s Armed Forces. b. AKA: N/A c. Location: DPRK 2. KOREA KUMSAN TRADING CORPORATION a. Description: Korea Kumsan Trading Corporation is owned or controlled by, or acting or purporting to act for or on behalf of, directly or indirectly, the General Bureau of Atomic Energy, which oversees the DPRK’s nuclear programme. b. AKA: N/A c. Location: Pyongyang, DPRK 3. KORYO BANK a. Description: Koryo Bank operates in the financial services industry in the DPRK’s economy and is associated with Office 38 and Office 39 of the KWP. b. AKA: N/A c. Location: Pyongyang, DPRK 4. STRATEGIC ROCKET FORCE OF THE KOREAN PEOPLE’S ARMY a. Description: The Strategic Rocket Force of the Korean People’s Army is in charge of all DPRK ballistic missile programmes and is responsible for SCUD and NODONG launches. b. AKA: Strategic Rocket Force; Strategic Rocket Force Command of KPA; Strategic Force; Strategic Forces c. Location: Pyongyang, DPRK 5. FOREIGN TRADE BANK (FTB) a. Description: Foreign Trade Bank is a state-owned bank and acts as the DPRK’s primary foreign exchange bank and has provided key financial support to the Korea Kwangson Banking Corporation. b. AKA: n/a c. Location: FTB Building, Jungsong-dong, Central District, Pyongyang, DPRK 6. KOREAN NATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY (KNIC) a. Description: The Korean National Insurance Company is a DPRK financial and insurance company and is affiliated with Office 39. b. AKA: Korea Foreign Insurance Company c. Location: Central District, Pyongyang, DPRK 7. KORYO CREDIT DEVELOPMENT BANK a. Description: Koryo Credit Development Bank operates in the financial services industry in the DPRK’s economy. b. AKA: Daesong Credit Development Bank; Koryo Global Credit Bank; Koryo Global Trust Bank c. Location: Pyongyang, DPRK 8. MANSUDAE OVERSEAS PROJECT GROUP OF COMPANIES a. Description: Mansudae Overseas Project Group of Companies engaged in, facilitated, or was responsible for the exportation of workers from the DPRK to other nations for construction-related activities including for statues and monuments to generate revenue for the Government of the DPRK or the Workers’ Party of Korea. The Mansudae Overseas Project Group of Companies has been reported to conduct business in countries in Africa and Southeast Asia including Algeria, Angola, Botswana, Benin, Cambodia, Chad, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Malaysia, Mozambique, Madagascar, Namibia, Syria, Togo, and Zimbabwe. b. AKA: Mansudae Art Studio c. Location: Pyongyang, DPRK 9. CENTRAL MILITARY COMMISSION OF THE WORKERS’ PARTY OF KOREA (CMC) a. Description: The Central Military Commission is responsible for the development and implementation of the Workers’ Party of Korea’s military policies, commands and controls the DPRK’s military, and directs the country’s military defense industries in coordination with the State Affairs Commission. b. AKA: n/a c. Location: Pyongyang, DPRK 10. ORGANIZATION AND GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT (OGD) a. Description: The Organization and Guidance Department is a very powerful body of the Worker’s Party of Korea. It directs key personnel appointments for the Workers’ Party of Korea, the DPRK’s military, and the DPRK’s government administration. It also purports to control the political affairs of all of the DPRK and is instrumental in implementing the DPRK’s censorship policies. b. AKA: n/a c. Location: DPRK 11. PROPAGANDA AND AGITATION DEPARTMENT (PAD) a. Description: The Propaganda and Agitation Department has full control over the media, which it uses as a tool to control the public on behalf of the DPRK leadership. The Propaganda and Agitation Department also engages in or is responsible for censorship by the Government of the DPRK, including newspaper and broadcast censorship. b. AKA: n/a c. Location: Pyongyang, DPRK 12. MINISTRY OF THE PEOPLE’S ARMED FORCES (MPAF) a. Description: The Ministry of the People’s Armed Forces manages the general administrative and logistical needs of the Korean People’s Army. b. Location: Pyongyang, DPRK
  4. TexAgRepublican

    North Korea

    I think for now, we should just increase economic sanctions. If we need to do more later, we can. I can help us draft a resolution.
  5. TexAgRepublican

    API Rally for Keystone Pipeline

    Vice President Kyle Fitzgerald: Howdy! Thank you everyone for that warm welcome. It’s great to be here today in front of so many American patriots. We’re all here today because we support American jobs and American energy. We support American energy independence. We know how important this issue is, and that’s why we’re out here in public fighting for it. The Keystone pipeline is a critical component of the Macmillan Administration's plan to create jobs and achieve energy independence. The reality is that America’s and the world’s energy demands are limitless. So-called alternative sources of energy just aren’t enough to meet that demand. We need fossil fuels to meet the demand. Those fossil fuels – mainly coal, natural gas, and oil – are going to be produced somewhere. Either they’ll be produced in places like Iran and North Korea, or they’ll be produced in places like Texas and Kentucky. For a couple obvious reasons, the Macmillan Administration is fully committed to producing them here in America. First of all, we just can’t trust some of these countries. Do we really want to be dependent on Saudi Arabia and China to keep our lights on and our cars running? What about in a time of war? Instead of depending on the rest of the world for energy, I want the rest of the world to depend on us. If we produced more energy here in America, maybe we wouldn't be so worried about what happens in the Middle East. Second, energy production creates good jobs. Our manufacturing sector has been decimated by bad trade deals and other misguided economic policies, and it has cost our country millions of good jobs. We can’t make the same mistake with energy. In fact, we can make up for a lot of the jobs we’ve lost by expanding our energy production. A lot of politicians in Washington want to raise the minimum wage to $15/hour. Instead, our focus should be on bringing more $15/hour jobs back to America. We can do that by increasing our domestic energy production. The Keystone pipeline accomplishes all of these goals. It's not the end game, but it's an important step along the way. It makes us less dependent on shady sources of foreign oil, and it will create tens of thousands of new jobs. These are good jobs too – many of them union. That’s why the labor unions support this. If their members don’t have jobs then the unions go out of business. That’s why you would think this would be a slam dunk, bi-partisan issue. But unfortunately, it’s not. Too many politicians would rather cater to a radical environmentalist agenda than do what is right for the American people and American workers. They can’t be allowed to block this, and that’s why we’re out here today fighting for what is right. This bill has passed through the House of Representatives and will be considered soon by the Senate. It’s time for the Senate to do the right thing and pass this bill. Call your Senator and tell them to vote yes for the Keystone pipeline.
  6. TexAgRepublican

    North Korea

    Can you explain this in more detail?
  7. TexAgRepublican

    Mobilising Against Sanctuary Cities Act

    Mr. Speaker, The whole point of merit-based immigration is to bring people into the country who have skills and abilities that we are currently lacking. It’s not to bring in clones of people we already have. That being said, I don’t know how the Gentleman from Colorado would have any idea whether or not I would be allowed to enter the country – not that it even matters. I yield.
  8. TexAgRepublican

    Experience 4

    Swanner is now HML.
  9. TexAgRepublican

    @jackswanner

    Honored to be elected House Majority Leader.
  10. TexAgRepublican

    @jackswanner

    Twitter for Rep. Jack Swanner
  11. TexAgRepublican

    Mobilising Against Sanctuary Cities Act

    Mr. Speaker, Can the Gentleman from Colorado show specific examples where I have made explicit statements against multiculturalism and Latinos? This is a pretty wild accusation to be making, particularly from a member of party leadership. My wife is Vietnamese, and we have a bi-racial child. There are plenty of Latinos in my district, most of them are here legally, and I have no issues with any of them. Ironically, the merit-based immigration system I have been pushing would be MORE multicultural than the arbitrary system of mass immigration we have today. Furthermore, the immigration vision that we are proposing is much closer to what the founders intended than what we currently have. In 1790 James Madison said the goal of immigration should be “to increase the wealth and strength of the community; and those who acquire the rights of citizenship, without adding to the strength or wealth of the community are not the people we are in want of.” The founders did not envision a broken system with unenforced laws where people enter the country illegally or because they won a lottery or because they're someone's second cousin. And finally, if anyone will be getting the lions share of the PAC funding from this debate, it will likely be the Democrats. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again – big business and big donors like the cheap labor illegal immigrants provide and they oppose legislation such as this. I yield.
  12. TexAgRepublican

    @jackswanner

    Proud to support legislation introduced by @RepFaulhammer to make America energy independent. Watch my floor speech here:
  13. TexAgRepublican

    Federal Land Freedom Act

    Mr. Speaker, Several leading Democrats, including the Minority Leader, have supported a resolution to withdraw our troops from Afghanistan. I supported that resolution at the time, and I still do. Our troops need to come home, and this administration and its military leadership should be working towards that result. But if we are serious about withdrawing our troops not just from Afghanistan but from the rest of the Middle East as well, we cannot do it without a plan to secure our energy independence. If we want to be out of the Middle East, we must start producing more of our own energy. We can’t have our cake and eat it too. We have to make a choice, and the Democrats who oppose things like the Keystone pipeline and other domestic energy proposals have to decide what they want. Either they want to be out of the Middle East, or they want to continue to shill for a radical environmentalist agenda and hinder American energy production. They can’t have both. As our population grows – a situation created in part because of our lax immigration policy – our energy demands will grow as well. Alternative sources are simply not enough to satisfy this demand. We need fossil fuels like coal and oil, and we need it from America – not Iran or Syria. We need bills like the Keystone authorization and this bill. I hope to see our colleagues on the other side of the aisle join me in support of this plan to make America energy independent. I yield.
  14. TexAgRepublican

    Mobilising Against Sanctuary Cities Act

    Mr. Speaker, A few things. First, for those of y’all following along at home, when the Gentleman from Arkansas calls us nationalistic, what that means is that we’re doing what is best for America. Second, again, polls don’t determine the course of our country – elections do. Third, most Evangelicals – at least those back home in my district – support the enforcement of America’s immigration laws. Sanctuary cities hinder the enforcement of those laws. I yield.
  15. Mr. Swanner, on behalf of President Macmillan and with thanks to Mr. Levin, Ms. Katpur and Mr. Shuster, submits A BILL To rebuild America's infrastructure, provide America's military with next generation equipment, and create millions of jobs. SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. (a) This act shall be cited as the Infrastructure, Jobs, and National Security Act (IJNSA). SEC. 2. REBUILD AMERICA FUND. (a) $100,000,000,000 will be appropriated annually from Fiscal Year 2019 through Fiscal Year 2028 for the construction of infrastructure projects, to be directed to each State government in the form of a block grant, with the total appropriation being divided on a per capita basis according to the total population of each State. (b) "Infrastructure" shall be defined as the basic physical and organizational structures and facilities, including but not limited to buildings, roads, bridges, utilities, and power supplies needed for the operation of a society or enterprise. SEC. 3. ENDING TAX HAVEN ABUSE. (a) The Department of the Treasury shall be authorized to impose restrictions on foreign jurisdictions or financial institutions operating in the United States that are of primary money laundering concern or that significantly impede U.S. tax enforcement. (b) Title 26 of the United States Code (the Internal Revenue Code) shall be amended to: (1) Authorize the Department of the Treasury to expand reporting requirements for U.S. persons who hold an interest in a passive foreign investment company; (2) establish a rebuttable presumption against the validity of transactions by institutions that do not comply with reporting requirements under the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act; (3) treat foreign corporations managed and controlled primarily in the United States as domestic corporations for tax purposes; (4) require tax withholding agents and financial institutions to report certain information about beneficial owners of foreign-owned financial accounts; (5) treat swap payments sent offshore as taxable U.S. source income; and (6) Authorize the Department of the Treasury to impose additional requirements for third party summonses used to obtain information in tax investigations that do not identify the person with respect to whose liability the summons is issued (i.e., John Doe summons). (c) The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 shall be amended to: (1) require corporations registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission to report annually, on a country-by country basis, on employees, gross revenues, payments made to governments, and other financial information; and (2) impose a fine for failure to disclose any holdings or transactions involving equity or debt instruments known to involve a foreign entity that would otherwise be subject to disclosure requirements. (d) Investment advisers and persons engaged in forming new business entities shall hereby subject to all current anti-money laundering requirements and laws. (e) The Department of the Treasury shall be authorized to impose new restrictions on U.S. corporations and other entities with foreign income with respect to: (1) tax deductions allocable to deferred foreign income, (2) the recalculation of foreign income taxes, (3) intangible property transferred overseas, (4) tax evasion activities by U.S. corporations reincorporating in a foreign country, and (5) the interest expense tax deduction of certain subsidiaries of foreign corporations with excess domestic indebtedness in order to prevent such deductions from being considered to drastically reduce tax income owed to the United States. (f) The rules on taxation of inverted entities (i.e., U.S. corporations that acquire foreign companies to reincorporate in a foreign jurisdiction with income tax rates lower than the United States) shall be amended to provide that a foreign corporation that acquires the properties of a U.S. corporation or partnership after the date of passage of this Act shall be treated as an inverted corporation and thus subject to U.S. taxation if, after such acquisition: (1) it holds more than 50% of the stock of the new entity (expanded affiliated group), or (2) the management or control of the new entity occurs primarily within the United States and the new entity has significant domestic business activities. SEC. 4. ESTABLISHMENT OF CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS. (a) This bill authorizes the President to establish a Civilian Conservation Corps to employ U.S. citizens ages 18-35 in the construction, maintenance, and carrying on of works of a public nature, including but not limited to the forestation of U.S. and state lands, prevention of forest fires, floods, and soil erosion, and construction and repair of National Park System paths and trails. (b) The President may extend corps activities to state- and private-owned lands to prevent and control forest fires and floods and attacks of forest tree pests and diseases. (c) The President is authorized to provide housing and transportation for corps employees. (d) There are authorized to be appropriated to the President $20,000,000,000 annually from Fiscal Year 2019 through Fiscal Year 2028 to establish and operate a Civilian Conservation Corps under this Act. (e) Beginning in the year following the enactment of this act, carried interest shall be taxed according to existing laws pertaining to income taxation. SEC. 5. MILITARY REARMAMENT FUND. (a) $300,000,000,000 will be appropriated to the Department of Defense for the following purposes: (1) The renewal and development of the Future Combat System (FCS) including but not limited to the development and production of replacements for the M-1 Abrams tank, the M-2 Bradley IFV, and the M-109A6 Paladin SP artillery system (2) The production of 10 Virginia Class Submarines. (3) The production of 10 Zumwalt Class Destroyers. (4) The production of 10 National Security Cutters. (5) The production of 100 B-21 Raiders. (6) The research, development, and production of a replacement of the M-4 Carbine. (7) Any other purpose the Secretary of Defense authorizes. (b) The money appropriated in this section will remain available until it is spent entirely. (c) All equipment procured by the Department of Defense must be manufactured entirely in the United States when available, including all components and materials of said equipment. SEC. 6. AIR TRAVEL MODERNIZATION. (a) The American Air Navigation Services Corporation is hereby established as a federally chartered, not-for-profit, user-fee funded corporation under the continued oversight of the Federal Aviation Administration and the Department of Transportation. (b) The Department of Transportation (DOT) shall transfer to the corporation: (1) within one year of the date of enactment of this act Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) employees, property, and facilities; and (2) within one year of the date of enactment of this act, operational control of FAA air traffic services. (c) DOT shall establish a Safety Oversight and Certification Advisory Committee. (d) The FAA shall establish: (1) the FAA Task Force on Flight Standards Reform, and (2) a Regulatory Consistency Communications Board. (e) The FAA shall establish a safety workforce training strategy. (f) DOT shall take appropriate actions to promote U.S. aerospace standards, products, and services abroad. (g) DOT shall modify FAA's final rule published August 19, 1994, relating to flight duty limitations and rest requirements to ensure that: (1) a flight attendant scheduled for a duty period of 14 hours or less is given a scheduled rest period of at least 10 consecutive hours, and (2) the rest period is not reduced under any circumstances. (h) DOT shall develop a comprehensive plan to accelerate the integration of civil unmanned aircraft systems (drones) into the national airspace system. (i) The FAA shall initiate a review of its strategic aviation cybersecurity plan. (j) DOT shall establish a remote air traffic control tower pilot program for rural or small communities. SEC. 7. ENACTMENT. (a) Unless otherwise stated, this act shall take effect immediately.
  16. Mr. Swanner, with thanks to Ms. Wagner, submits A BILL To amend the Communications Act of 1934 to clarify that section 230 of such Act does not prohibit the enforcement against providers and users of interactive computer services of Federal and State criminal and civil law relating to sexual exploitation of children or sex trafficking, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the “Allow States and Victims to Fight Online Sex Trafficking Act”. SEC. 2. SENSE OF CONGRESS. It is the sense of Congress that— (1) section 230 of the Communications Act of 1934 (47 U.S.C. 230; commonly known as the “Communications Decency Act of 1996”) was never intended to provide legal protection to websites that unlawfully promote and facilitate prostitution and websites that facilitate traffickers in advertising the sale of unlawful sex acts with sex trafficking victims; (2) websites that promote and facilitate prostitution have been reckless in allowing the sale of sex trafficking victims and have done nothing to prevent the trafficking of children and victims of force, fraud, and coercion; and (3) clarification of such section is warranted to ensure that such section does not provide such protection to such websites. SEC. 3. PROMOTION OF PROSTITUTION AND RECKLESS DISREGARD OF SEX TRAFFICKING. (a) Promotion Of Prostitution.—Chapter 117 of title 18, United States Code, is amended by inserting after section 2421 the following: “§ 2421A. Promotion or facilitation of prostitution and reckless disregard of sex trafficking “(a) In General.—Whoever, using a facility or means of interstate or foreign commerce or in or affecting interstate or foreign commerce, owns, manages, or operates an interactive computer service (as such term is defined in defined in section 230(f) the Communications Act of 1934 (47 U.S.C. 230(f))), or conspires or attempts to do so, with the intent to promote or facilitate the prostitution of another person shall be fined under this title, imprisoned for not more than 10 years, or both. “(b) Aggravated Violation.—Whoever, using a facility or means of interstate or foreign commerce or in or affecting interstate or foreign commerce, owns, manages, or operates an interactive computer service (as such term is defined in defined in section 230(f) the Communications Act of 1934 (47 U.S.C. 230(f))), or conspires or attempts to do so, with the intent to promote or facilitate the prostitution of another person and— “(1) promotes or facilitates the prostitution of 5 or more persons; or “(2) acts in reckless disregard of the fact that such conduct contributed to sex trafficking, in violation of 1591(a), shall be fined under this title, imprisoned for not more than 25 years, or both. “(c) Civil Recovery.—Any person injured by reason of a violation of section 2421A(b) may recover damages and reasonable attorneys’ fees in an action before any appropriate United States district court. “(d) Mandatory Restitution.—Notwithstanding sections 3663 or 3663A and in addition to any other civil or criminal penalties authorized by law, the court shall order restitution for any violation of subsection (b)(2). The scope and nature of such restitution shall be consistent with section 2327(b). “(e) Affirmative Defense.—It shall be an affirmative defense to a charge of violating subsection (a), or subsection (b)(1) where the defendant proves, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the promotion or facilitation of prostitution is legal in the jurisdiction where the promotion or facilitation was targeted.”. (b) Table Of Contents.—The table of contents for such chapter is amended by inserting after the item relating to section 2421 the following: “2421A. Promotion or facilitation of prostitution and reckless disregard of sex trafficking.”. SEC. 4. ENSURING ABILITY TO ENFORCE FEDERAL AND STATE CRIMINAL AND CIVIL LAW RELATING TO SEX TRAFFICKING. (a) In General.—Section 230(e) of the Communications Act of 1934 (47 U.S.C. 230(e)) is amended by adding at the end the following: “(5) NO EFFECT ON SEX TRAFFICKING LAW.—Nothing in this section (other than subsection (c)(2)(A)) shall be construed to impair or limit— “(A) any claim in a civil action brought under section 1595 of title 18, United States Code, if the conduct underlying the claim constitutes a violation of section 1591 of that title; “(B) any charge in a criminal prosecution brought under State law if the conduct underlying the charge would constitute a violation of section 1591 of title 18, United States Code; or “(C) any charge in a criminal prosecution brought under State law if the conduct underlying the charge would constitute a violation of section 2421A of title 18, United States Code, and promotion or facilitation of prostitution is illegal in the jurisdiction where the defendant’s promotion or facilitation of prostitution was targeted.”. (b) Effective Date.—The amendments made by this section shall take effect on the date of the enactment of this Act, and the amendment made by subsection (a) shall apply regardless of whether the conduct alleged occurred, or is alleged to have occurred, before, on, or after such date of enactment. SEC. 5. ENSURING FEDERAL LIABILITY FOR PUBLISHING INFORMATION DESIGNED TO FACILITATE SEX TRAFFICKING OR OTHERWISE FACILITATING SEX TRAFFICKING. Section 1591(e) of title 18, United States Code, is amended— (1) by redesignating paragraphs (4) and (5) as paragraphs (5) and (6), respectively; and (2) by inserting after paragraph (3) the following: “(4) The term ‘participation in a venture’ means knowingly assisting, supporting, or facilitating a violation of subsection (a)(1).”. SEC. 6. ACTIONS BY STATE ATTORNEYS GENERAL. (a) In General.—Section 1595 of title 18, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following: “(d) In any case in which the attorney general of a State has reason to believe that an interest of the residents of that State has been or is threatened or adversely affected by any person who violates section 1591, the attorney general of the State, as parens patriae, may bring a civil action against such person on behalf of the residents of the State in an appropriate district court of the United States to obtain appropriate relief.”. (b) Technical And Conforming Amendments.—Section 1595 of title 18, United States Code, is amended— (1) in subsection (b)(1), by striking “this section” and inserting “subsection (a)”; and (2) in subsection (c), in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by striking “this section” and inserting “subsection (a)”. SEC. 7. SAVINGS CLAUSE. Nothing in this Act or the amendments made by this Act shall be construed to limit or preempt any civil action or criminal prosecution under Federal law or State law (including State statutory law and State common law) filed before or after the day before the date of enactment of this Act that was not limited or preempted by section 230 of the Communications Act of 1934 (47 U.S.C. 230), as such section was in effect on the day before the date of enactment of this Act. PES: (Sec. 2) This bill expresses the sense of Congress that section 230 of the Communications Act of 1934 was not intended to provide legal protection to websites that unlawfully promote and facilitate prostitution and websites that facilitate traffickers in advertising the sale of unlawful sex acts with sex trafficking victims. Section 230 limits the legal liability of interactive computer service providers or users for content they publish that was created by others. (Sec. 3) The bill amends the federal criminal code to add a new section that imposes penalties—a fine, a prison term of up to 10 years, or both—on a person who, using a facility or means of interstate or foreign commerce, owns, manages, or operates an interactive computer service (or attempts or conspires to do so) to promote or facilitate the prostitution of another person. Additionally, it establishes enhanced penalties—a fine, a prison term of up to 25 years, or both—for a person who commits the offense in one of the following aggravating circumstances: (1) promotes or facilitates the prostitution of five or more persons, or (2) acts with reckless disregard that such conduct contributes to sex trafficking. A person injured by an aggravated offense may recover damages and attorneys' fees in a federal civil action. A court must order mandatory restitution, in addition to other criminal or civil penalties, for an aggravated offense in which a person acts with reckless disregard that such conduct contributes to sex trafficking. A defendant may assert, as an affirmative defense, that the promotion or facilitation of prostitution is legal in the jurisdiction where it was targeted. (Sec. 4) The bill amends the Communications Act of 1934 to declare that section 230 does not limit: (1) a federal civil claim for conduct that constitutes sex trafficking, (2) a federal criminal charge for conduct that constitutes sex trafficking, or (3) a state criminal charge for conduct that promotes or facilitates prostitution in violation of this bill. The amendments apply regardless of whether alleged conduct occurs before, on, or after this bill's enactment. (Sec. 5) The bill amends the federal criminal code to define a phrase related to the prohibition on sex trafficking. Currently, it a crime to knowingly benefit from participation in a venture that engages in sex trafficking. This bill defines "participation in a venture" to mean knowingly assisting, supporting, or facilitating a sex trafficking violation. (Sec. 6) A state may file a federal civil action to enforce federal sex trafficking violations. (Sec. 7) This section states that this bill does not limit federal or state civil actions or criminal prosecutions that are not preempted by section 230 of the Communications Act of 1934.
  17. TexAgRepublican

    Mobilising Against Sanctuary Cities Act

    Mr Speaker I second this amendment. I yield.
  18. TexAgRepublican

    In-Session Campaigning 2018

    Jack Swanner 1. Fundraiser - Texas (2 hours) 2. Fundraiser - Texas (2 hours) 3. Fundraiser - Texas (2 hours) 4. Fundraiser - Texas (2 hours) 3. Rally for House Republicans in Texas targeting Nationalists (1 hour) 4. Rally for House Republicans in Texas targeting Evangelicals (1 hour) 4. Upgrade each attribute twice (2 hours) $16 million Total spending $16 million
  19. TexAgRepublican

    In-Session Campaigning 2018

    Kyle Fitzgerald 1. Fundraiser - Texas (2 hours) 2. Fundraiser - Texas (2 hours) 3. Fundraiser - Texas (2 hours) 4. Fundraiser - Texas (2 hours) 3. Rally for House Republicans in Texas targeting Nationalists (1 hour) 4. Rally for House Republicans in Texas targeting Evangelicals (1 hour) 4. Upgrade each attribute twice (2 hours) $16 million Total spending $16 million
  20. TexAgRepublican

    Leave of absence

    Moving tomorrow, won't have internet until Sunday, and then I'm going to be insanely busy next week.
  21. TexAgRepublican

    High Poverty School Teacher Tax Credit Act

    cs
  22. TexAgRepublican

    North Korea

    Egypt supports economic sanctions but strongly opposes military action at this time.
  23. TexAgRepublican

    Swanner Votes for American Jobs 

    Jack Swanner The Office of Rep. Jack Swanner For Immediate Release Washington, DC – Rep. Jack Swanner (R-TX) spoke to the press about his vote in favor of the Keystone XL Pipeline Approval Act. “I voted on the House Floor in favor of the Keystone XL Pipeline Approval Act. I voted for this bill for two reasons. First of all, this bill will create jobs. During the Obama Administration, the State Department estimated that 42,000 jobs and $2 billion in wages will be created by completing the pipeline. That is an average salary of nearly $50,000 per job. “Second, this bill will promote American energy independence. Upon completion, this pipeline will transport nearly a million barrels of oil per day from Canada to Texas and into American refineries. It will reduce our dependence on oil from the Middle East. “Jobs and energy are both very important to Texans. That’s why I couldn’t possibly vote against this bill. I’m puzzled by the opposition from the Democratic Party. The Laborers International Union supports this bill because of the jobs and wealth it will create for their union members. By opposing this bill, House Democrats are going against the wishes of some of their staunchest supporters.” View full PR
  24. Kyle Fitzgerald The Naval Observatory For Immediate Release Brownsville, TX – Vice President Kyle Fitzgerald returned to his home state to visit with National Guard troops along the U.S.-Mexico border. During the visit, Fitzgerald conducted a tour of border security operations currently in progress and thanked the soldiers for their efforts, speaking with many of them one-on-one. Afterwards, he spoke to a large group of soldiers and talked about the Macmillan Administration’s border security agenda. “First of all, I just wanted to thank each and every one of you for what you’re doing down here. I already thanked many of you individually, but each and every soldier out here is owed a debt of gratitude from our nation. You are true patriots. You are taking time away from your jobs and family to protect your fellow Americans. This is exactly what you signed up for – defending our homeland. “Today, I wanted to talk to you about how your mission fits within the Macmillan Administration’s broader border security strategy. Our strategy is being implemented in three parts. What you are doing right now is the first part. The second part is the Border Security and Immigration Reform Act, a bill recently signed into law by President Macmillan. This bill invests $13 billion through 2020 and creates permanent revenue streams afterwards for the implementation of what many people call a virtual wall. This virtual wall will include tactical infrastructure and technology such as aircraft, patrol boats, and surveillance equipment. All the latest technology that is needed will be deployed to the border to keep our country safe. The virtual wall will also include mandatory e-verify for all employers to stop the hiring of illegal aliens and biometric screening at airports and other ports of entry to stop people from overstaying their visas. “The third part of our plan is the American National Security Act, a bill sponsored by fellow Texan Jack Swanner that is currently being considered in the House of Representatives. This bill authorizes and funds the construction of a physical wall along at least 1,000 miles of this border. This wall will be made of precast concrete and will be at least 30 feet tall while also extending at least 10 feet underground. It will be unscalable and impenetrable. This bill also deputizes local law enforcement to enforce immigration laws and enacts enhanced vetting procedures for immigrants entering our country – especially refugees from countries compromised by terrorism. “Each part of this plan is necessary and is an important piece of our broader border security strategy. New technology is great, but we must have physical security along our border. And while a physical wall is going to secure large stretches of our border, it isn’t practical in many areas. That’s where the virtual wall comes in. And while we wait to either enact or implement these provisions, we need security right now. That’s where you come in, and that’s why you’re down here. “This is not a permanent deployment. We intend to wrap this mission up as soon as possible. But right now, you are performing a vital and necessary national security function. This administration takes border security very seriously, and you have our full and unconditional support. Thank you for everything you do, and God bless America.” View full PR
  25. TexAgRepublican

    Russ Costello (Democrat)

    Welcome back
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